OISE Graduate Studies in Education Bulletin
2018-2019

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning (CTL)

       Codes:

Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program  -  MEd, MA, PhD

Language and Literacies Education Program  -  MEd, MA, PhD

Master of Teaching - MT

For more information on CTL programs, please see the School of Graduate Studies (SGS) Calendar.  For details about Collaborative Specializations, please also visit the SGS website

Curriculum Studies & Teacher Development Program

Curriculum Studies & Teacher Development Program

The Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program (CSTD) is a forum for systematic reflection on curriculum, viewed in the broadest sense as educational experiences that occur in both formal and informal settings. This includes a critical examination of the substance (subject matter, courses, programs of study), purposes, and practices used for bringing about learning in educational settings. Given the diverse academic and research interests of our faculty, the program is organized into six constituent but optional program Emphases.

The Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development program (CSTD) offers the following six program Emphases:

PhD, MA, and MEd students enrolled in CSTD Emphases are required to take 3 courses from a list of courses affiliated with the Emphasis. Students who successfully complete Emphasis coursework as part of their CSTD degree requirements may request a letter of completion in the Emphasis.

Critical Studies in Curriculum and Pedagogy Emphasis
Taking curriculum and pedagogy broadly defined as points of departure, the Critical Studies in Curriculum and Pedagogy (CSCP) Emphasis is a forum for systematic and interdisciplinary reflection on the myriad of processes and contexts related to both formal and informal educational experience, from schools and local communities, to media and transnational cultural contexts. CSCP recognizes and engages the tangled histories of those on whose traditional lands our scholarship and education is situated - the Ouendat (Wyandot-Huron), Onondowahgah (Seneca- Hodenosaunee) and the Misi-zaagiing (Mississaugas-Anishinaabek) nations. Subject to the Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement between the Iroquois Confederacy and the Ojibwe and allied nations to peaceably share and care for the resources around the Great Lakes, the CSCP Emphasis is committed to decolonization and the integration of Indigenous knowledges, recognizing that this land is first and foremost Indigenous land and that we all exist in relationship to each other and to this land in both historical and contemporary realities. With this recognition in mind, the CSCP Emphasis encourages a critical exploration of educational phenomena, within and beyond the scope of educational institutions like schools, with a focus on power relations, decolonization, and anti-discrimination. The kinds of educational phenomena considered within this cluster cover a wide range of issues and topics, such as student experience, indigeneity, human interaction, subjectivity, knowledge production, ecology, environmental justice, globalization, peace-building, colonialism, race, disability, gender, sexuality, cultural and linguistic difference, technology, and media production. Faculty affiliated with this cluster have a commitment to educational scholarship--including indigenous, international, and transnational perspectives--that promotes social justice, equity, and a critical consideration of how social categories and institutions shape educational experiences with a view to promoting and informing sustainable emancipatory, decolonizing, nonviolent, and anti-oppressive practices.

PhD, MA, and MEd students enrolled in the Critical Studies in Curriculum and Pedagogy (CSCP) Emphasis are required to take 3 courses from the following list affiliated with the Emphasis.  Students who successfully complete CSCP coursework as part of their CSTD degree requirements may request a letter of completion in the Emphasis.

Affiliated Courses:
CTL1011H Anti-Oppression Education in School Settings
CTL1024H Poststructuralism and Education
CTL1031H Language, Culture, and Identity: Literary Text in Teacher Development
CTL1048H Qualitative Methodology: Challenges and Innovations [RM]
CTL1062H Performed Ethnography and Research-Informed Theatre [RM]
CTL1063H Pedagogies of Solidarity
CTL1064H Applied Theatre and Performance in Sites of Learning
CTL1065H Approaches to Anti-Homophobia and Anti-Transphobia Education
CTL1099H Critical Approaches to Art-Based Research [RM]
CTL1218H Culture and Cognition in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education
CTL1219H Making Secondary Mathematics Meaningful
CTL1220H Sociocultural Theories of Learning
CTL1221H Experiencing Science Education as a Global Educational and Development Endeavor
CTL1304H Cultural Studies and Education
CTL1306H Qualitative Research Methods in Education: Concepts and Methods [RM]
CTL1307H Identity Construction and Education of Minorities
CTL1309H Les stéréotypes sexuels dans les programmes scolaires
CTL1312H Democratic Citizenship Education
CTL1313H Gender Equity in the Classroom
CTL1318H Teaching Conflict and Conflict Resolution
CTL1319H Religious Education: Comparative and International Perspectives
CTL1816H Minority Education and Inclusion: Policies in Practice
CTL1818H Arts in Education: Concepts, Contexts, and Frameworks
CTL1822H Urban School Research: Youth, Pedagogy, and the Arts [RM]
CTL1861H Critical Ethnography [RM]
CTL3034H New Literacies: Making Multiple Meanings

Arts in Education Emphasis
The Arts in Education Emphasis will allow students to take specialized courses in the areas of music and sound, drama and theatre, visual art, and performance and in particular courses that reflect social justice concerns reflected through the arts and cultural production. This Emphasis will attract students interested in the arts, elementary and secondary arts specialist teachers, and community, gallery and museum educators interested in examining arts education beyond schooling.

PhD, MA, and MEd students enrolled in the Arts in Education Emphasis are required to take 3 courses from the following list affiliated with the emphasis.  Students who successfully complete Arts in Education coursework as part of their CSTD degree requirements may request a letter of completion in the Emphasis.

Affiliated Courses:
CTL1104H Play, Drama, and Arts Education
CTL1026H Performed Ethnography
CTL1065H Applied Theatre and Performance in Sites of Learning
CTL1099H Critical Approaches to Arts Based Research
CTL1322H Literacies of Land: Narrative, Storying and Literature
CTL1811H Writing Research - Research Writing: Moving from Idea to Reality
CTL1818H Arts in Education: Concepts, Contexts, and Frameworks
CTL1822H Urban School Research: Youth, Pedagogy, and the Arts
CTL5018H Sounds of Change: Issues in Music Education
CTL5019H Walking and Sensory Methodologies
CTL5020H Desire and Change: Difficult Dialogues in Contemporary Art and Art Education
CTL5013H Creativity in the Classroom

 

Emphasis in Digital Technologies in Education
The Digital Technologies in Education Emphasis is designed to engage educators in a critical examination of technology and its effective use in educational contexts.  Drawing on research from the fields of the learning sciences, psychology, diversity studies, and information and communication technology, learners will deepen their understanding of such topics as computational thinking, gamification of learning, online knowledge communities, social media, immersive simulations, technology and assessment, mobile devices and knowledge building. These courses will address emerging trends in the contemporary digital technologies landscape. Given the thousands of educational apps and web-based technologies available to teachers, where are we seeing potential? 

PhD, MA, and MEd students enrolled in the Digital Technologies in Education Emphasis are required to take 3 courses from the following list affiliated with the Emphasis.  Students who successfully complete Digital Technologies in Education Emphasis coursework as part of their CSTD degree requirements may request a letter of completion in the Emphasis.
 
Affiliated Courses:
CTL1602H Introduction to Computers in Education
CTL1603H Introduction to Knowledge Building 
CTL1606H Computers in the Curriculum
CTL1608H Constructive Learning and Design of Online Environments 
CTL1609H Educational Applications of Computer-Mediated Communication
CTL5015H Social Media and Education
CTL1923H Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing in Education 
CTL1926H Knowledge Media and Learning


Emphasis in Indigenous Education and Decolonization
The Emphasis in Indigenous Education and Decolonization examines the complex and tangled histories of those on whose traditional lands OISE/University of Toronto is situated - the Ouendat (Wyandot-Huron), Onondowahgah (Seneca- Hodenosaunee) and the Misi-zaagiing (Mississaugas-Anishinaabek) nations. This territory is subject to the Dish With One Spoon Wampum Belt Covenant, an agreement between the Iroquois Confederacy and the Ojibwe and allied nations to peaceably share and care for the resources around the Great Lakes. This Emphasis will provide an entry point into the knowledge systems that emerge from this particular land, with an emphasis on land itself as a teacher and a source of knowledge. The Emphasis will be grounded on a decolonial pedagogy, with a commitment to anti-colonization and decolonization practices. Recognizing that this land has and still does exist first and foremost in relationship to Indigenous people requires a critical consciousness and acknowledgement of whose traditional lands we are now on as well as the historical and contemporary realities of those relationships.  It is this understanding that forms the philosophical foundation upon which all of our courses position themselves within the emphasis.

PhD, MA, and MEd students enrolled in the Emphasis in Indigenous Education and Decolonization are required to take 3 courses from the following list affiliated with the Emphasis.  Students who successfully complete Emphasis coursework as part of their CSTD degree requirements may request a letter of completion in the Emphasis.

Affiliated Courses:
CTL1024H Poststructuralism and Education 
CTL1063H Pedagogies of Solidarity 
CTL1320H Introduction to Aboriginal Land-centered Education: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives 
CTL1321H Aboriginal Civilization: Language, Culture and Identity
CTL1322H Literacies of Land: Narrative, Storying and Literature 
CTL5029H Land‐centred Approaches to Research and Community Engagement: Bringing a 'Good' Mind to Indigenous Education Research 
CTL5010H Introduction to Decolonization in Education 

Emphasis in Qualitative Methodologies
The Qualitative Methodologies Emphasis will encourage a focused exploration of qualitative paradigms, approaches and methods within, and beyond, the scope of schools and education. This emphasis will allow students to take introductory and specialized courses in a range of contemporary qualitative methodologies in areas such as research and participatory inquiry; arts-based research and performed ethnography; feminist and queer approaches; indigenous methodologies, anti-colonial, decolonial and post-foundational and social justice research. These courses will address the need for students to deepen their understanding, application and specialization in qualitative methodologies in education. Students will also engage in an exploration of how qualitative methodologies are applied in non-formal education context as social justice pedagogies.
 
PhD, MA, and MEd students enrolled in the Qualitative Methodologies Emphasis are required to take 3 courses from the following list of courses affiliated with the Emphasis.  Students who successfully complete Qualitative Methodologies coursework as part of their CSTD degree requirements may request a letter of completion in the Emphasis.

Affiliated  Courses:
CTL1018H Intro to Qualitative Inquiry
CTL1041H Research Methods in Education
CTL1048H Qualitative Methodology: Challenges and Innovations 
CTL1049H Critical Practitioner Research in Education 
CTL1062H Performed Ethnography and Research Informed Theatre
CTL1063H Pedagogies of Solidarity
CTL1099H Critical Approaches to Art-Based Research
CTL1105H Research and Inquiry in Arts Education 
CTL1211H Action Research in Science, Mathematics and Technology Education 
CTL1306H La recherche qualitative en éducation: bases théoriques et pratiques / Qualitative Research Methods in Education: Concepts and Methods 
CTL1322H Literacies of Land: Narrative, Storying and Literature 
CTL1801H Action Research and Professional Practice 
CTL1809H Narrative and Story in Research and Professional Practice
CTL1810H Qualitative Research in Curriculum and Teaching 
CTL1822H Urban School Research: Youth, Pedagogy, and the Arts​ 
CTL1861H Critical Ethnography
CTL5019H Walking and Sensory Methodologies
CTL5029H Land‐centred Approaches to Research and Community Engagement: Bringing a 'Good' Mind to Indigenous Education Research
CTL5030H Poststructural Methodologies in Educational Research

Emphasis in Science, Mathematics and Technology (SMT)
The SMT Emphasis is dedicated to exploring theory, practice and contemporary issues pertaining to science, mathematics and technology (SMT) education in diverse settings and contexts. We are a vibrant community of scholars and graduate students that thrive on collegiality, intellectual debate, critical analyses and inquiry.

Drawing on research and practice, we explore and critique innovative science, mathematics and technology education, while supporting research, curriculum development, and teaching. With strong connections to the SMT Centre, and the collaborative engineering education program, we invite you to join us and engage deeply with topics such as STEM, mathematics pedagogy, equity, inclusion, diversity, activism, and social and environmental justice.

PhD, MA, and MEd students enrolled in the SMT Emphasis are required to take 3 courses from the following list of Affiliated Courses.

Affiliated Courses
CTL1116H Holistic Education Approaches in Elementary School Mathematics
CTL1119H Gaining Confidence in Mathematics: Reconstructing Mathematics Knowledge and Overcoming Anxiety (K-8)
CTL1120H Effective Teaching Strategies in Elementary Mathematics Education: Research and Practice
CTL1202H Mathematics in the School Curriculum: Elementary
CTL1206H Teaching and Learning Science
CTL1207H Teaching and Learning about Science: Issues and Strategies in Science, Technology, Society and Environment (STSE) Education
CTL1209H Current Issues in Science and Technology Education
CTL1212H Curriculum Making in Science: Some Considerations in the History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science
CTL1214H Equity Issues in Science Education
CTL1215H Teaching and Learning about Science and Technology: Beyond Schools
CTL1216H Teacher Leadership in Science, Mathematics & Technology Education
CTL1217H Integrating Science, Mathematics and Technology Curricula
CTL1218H Culture and Cognition in Mathematics, Science and Technology
CTL1219H Making Secondary Mathematics Meaningful
CTL1221H Education for Human Goals Local and Global: How is Science Education Helping?
CTL1222H Environmental Studies in Science, Mathematics & Technology Education
CTL1223H Activist Science & Technology Education
CTL1606H Computers in the Curriculum
CTL1608H Constructive Learning and Design of Online Environments
CTL1609H Educational Applications of Computer-Mediated Communication
CTL1841H Research Seminar in Science, Mathematics and Technology Education


Degrees

Master of Education

The MEd degree is designed for a wide range of educational experiences/work that includes but is not limited to teachers, health workers, community-based educators, educational activists, school board administrators, postsecondary faculty, individuals in corporate and not-for-profit industries, and people in other education-related fields.  Applicants should have demonstrated commitment to education prior to applying.

Applicants are accepted under the general regulations which specify an appropriate bachelor's degree, or its equivalent with an academic standing equivalent to at least mid-B or better in the final year from a recognized university.

In the Statement of Intent, applicants should state the reasons they wish to study curriculum at the graduate level. The chief academic interests, professional concerns, and career plans related to curriculum studies and teacher development should be discussed. In order to identify their research interests in their Statement of Intent, applicants should visit the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program web page.  The Admissions Committee reviews this Statement to determine the kind of focus or area of study in which an applicant is most interested and to link them to appropriate faculty advisors.

The MEd program of study consists of 10 half-courses, at least five of which are normally CTL 1000-level courses undertaken in the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program, and may be taken on a full- or part-time basis. Additional study may be required either within the degree program or prior to admission, depending on previous experience and academic qualifications. Students are required to successfully complete CTL1000H.  All requirements for the degree must be completed within six years of first enrollment for part-time students, or within three years of first enrollment for full-time students.

NOTE: The Master of Education program is not a teacher certification program.  For more information on our teacher certification programs please visit: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/ro/Teacher_Education_Info/index.html.

Master of Arts

The MA degree program is designed to provide academic study and research training related to curriculum studies. Applicants are accepted under the general regulations. Admission normally requires an appropriate bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, in a relevant discipline or professional program completed with standing equivalent to mid-B or better in the final year.

Ordinarily, applicants will have at least one year of relevant, successful, professional experience prior to applying. Students who anticipate going on to further study at the PhD level are advised to apply for enrollment in an MA rather than an MEd degree program.

In the Statement of Intent, applicants should state the reasons they wish to undertake a research-oriented program of study in curriculum or teacher development. The chief academic interests and experience, professional concerns, and career plans related to an aspect of curriculum studies should be discussed. In order to identify their research interests in their Statement of Intent, applicants should visit the website for the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program.  The Admissions Committee reviews this Statement to determine the kind of curriculum problem or area of study in which an applicant is most interested and to link them to appropriate faculty advisors.

The MA may be taken on a full- or part-time basis and consists of eight half-courses, at least four of which are normally CTL 1000-level courses undertaken in the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program, and a thesis. Additional courses may be required of some applicants, depending on previous experience and academic qualifications. Students are required to successfully complete CTL1000H, and a course in research methods from an approved course listing.  A listing of approved research methods courses is available on the website of the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program.  

NOTE:  Candidates are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, thesis committee formation and ethical review. All requirements for the degree must be completed within six years of first enrollment for part-time students, or within three years of first enrollment for full-time students.

Doctor of Philosophy

The PhD demands a strong commitment to research. The Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program offers both a full-time and a flexible-time PhD program option. Applicants must declare the option(s) for which they are interested in applying.

Full-time PhD option:
Applicants are accepted under SGS general regulations. An appropriate master's degree in education or its equivalent from a recognized university, in the same area of specialization as proposed at the doctoral level is required. This degree must be completed with an average grade equivalent to B+ or better. Further documentation may be required to establish equivalence.  A minimum of two years professional experience prior to applying will normally be expected. Applicants are required to submit as part of a complete application:

  1. Their master’s thesis or a sample of single-authored scholarly writing. Details of what constitutes an appropriate writing sample can be found on the CSTD program Web page:>
    www.oise.utoronto.ca/ctl/Prospective_Students/CTL_Graduate_Programs/Curriculum_Studies_and_Teacher_Development_(CSTD)/index.html
  2. A Statement of Intent describing their intellectual interests and concerns relevant to curriculum studies and teacher development, reasons for wishing to take the program, previous qualifications and professional experiences, and future career goals; and
  3. Two letters of reference, one academic and one professional.

Flexible-time PhD option:
Applicants to the flexible-time PhD option are accepted under SGS general regulations and are subject to the same admission requirements as applicants to the full-time PhD option. However, in addition, applicants to the flexible-time PhD option should demonstrate that they are active professionals engaged in activities relevant to their proposed program of study.

Program Requirements:
Degree requirements for both programs are the same. The PhD program of study normally consists of seven half courses, at least four of which are ordinarily CTL 1000-level courses undertaken in the Program. Students are also required to complete CTL1899H, the CSTD doctoral proseminar course. Additional courses may be required of some candidates. Students are expected to take CTL1000H if they did not complete it at the master’s level, one course in research methods from an approved course listing, as well as the Doctoral proseminar. The listing for approved research methods courses is available on the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program web page <www.oise.utoronto.ca/ctl/Prospective_Students/CTL_Graduate_Programs/Curriculum_Studies_and_Teacher_Development_(CSTD)/index.html>.  Students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination. In addition, a thesis embodying the results of an original investigation, and a final oral examination on the content and implications of the thesis, are also required.

NOTE: Students are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, comprehensive examination, thesis committee formation and ethical review. Full-time PhD students must complete their degree within six years and flexible-time PhD students within eight years. All doctoral students must register continuously until all degree requirements have been fulfilled. Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Language and Literacies Education Program

Language and Literacies Education Program

For program statement and other information please see the program website:
http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/ctl/Prospective_Students/CTL_Graduate_Programs

Master of Education

Applicants are accepted under SGS general regulations, which specify an appropriate bachelor’s degree with high academic standing from a recognized university. Ordinarily, applicants should have teacher certification and at least one year of relevant successful professional experience prior to applying. All applicants are required to submit a resumé and a Statement of Intent describing their reasons for wishing to apply to the program, previous qualifications and professional experiences, particular research or professional interests, and future career goals.

The MEd consists of 10 half courses. Students must take a minimum of five CTL3000-level half courses within the program. The MEd program of study may be taken on a full-time or part-time basis. All requirements for the degree must be satisfactorily completed within six years of first enrollment for part-time students, or within three years of first enrollment for full-time students.

See the SGS Calendar for degree requirements.

Master of Arts

Applicants are accepted under SGS general regulations, which specify an appropriate bachelor’s degree with high academic standing from a recognized university. Ordinarily, applicants should have teacher certification and at least one year of relevant successful professional experience prior to applying. The MA is intended for students expecting to pursue a doctorate in the future. All MA applicants are required to submit a resumé and a Statement of Intent describing their reasons for wishing to apply to the program, previous qualifications and professional experiences, particular research or professional interests, and future career goals.

The MA program of study may be undertaken on a full-time or part-time basis and consists of eight half-courses and a thesis. Students must take a minimum of four CTL 3000-level half-courses within the program. Courses must include CTL3001H - Research Colloquium in Language and Literacies Education (usually offered Wednesday evenings during the Winter Session), plus a course in research methods [RM] relevant to the topic of the thesis.  Any of the following courses can fulfill this requirement: 
CTL1018H, CTL1041H, CTL1306H, CTL1810H, CTL1842H, CTL3019H, CTL3033H, CTL3800H, CTL3807H, CTL3810H, JOI1287H, JOI1288H, APD1296H, APD3202H, APD3228HSJE1905H

A student wishing to propose an alternative course to fulfill one of the course requirements will be required to obtain the approval of both the program coordinator and either their faculty advisor or thesis supervisor. Final approval resides with the School of Graduate Studies.

NOTE:  Candidates are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, thesis committee formation and ethical review. All requirements for the degree must be satisfactorily completed within six years of first enrollment for part-time students, or within three years of first enrollment for full-time students.

See the SGS Calendar for degree requirements.

Doctor of Philosophy

The PhD demands a strong commitment to research. The Language and Literacies Education program offers full-time and flexible-time PhD options. Applicants must declare the option(s) for which they are interested in applying.

Full-time PhD option:
Applicants are accepted under SGS general regulations. An appropriate Master’s degree with standing equivalent to B+ or better from a recognized university is required. Admission is contingent upon satisfactory completion of a Master’s thesis, or the equivalent in the form of a scholarly piece of writing. Ordinarily, applicants will have a minimum of two years relevant professional experience prior to applying. All applicants are required to submit a resumé and a Statement of Intent describing their reasons for wishing to apply to the program, previous qualifications and professional experiences, particular research or professional interests, and future career goals. A sample of single-authored scholarly writing must be submitted with the application.

Flexible-time PhD option:
Applicants to the flexible-time PhD option are accepted under SGS general regulations and are subject to the same admission requirements as applicants to the full-time PhD option. In addition, applicants to the flexible-time PhD option should demonstrate that they are active professionals engaged in activities relevant to their proposed program of study.

Degree requirements:
Degree requirements for both programs are the same. The PhD involves seven to eight half-courses (depending on previous experience and academic qualifications), a comprehensive examination, and a thesis embodying the results of an original investigation and a final oral examination on the content and implications of the thesis. Students must take a minimum of four CTL3000-level half-courses within the program. Students are required to take CTL3001H Research Colloquium in Language and Literacies Education (usually offered Wednesday evenings during the Winter session), as well as CTL3899H Proseminar in Language and Literacies Education, if not previously taken at the Masters level.  If CTL3001H or CTL3899H were taken at the Master's level, students are not permitted to take either course again and should substitute with another CTL3000-level course(s). A research methods [RM] course relevant to the topic of the thesis is also a requirement of the PhD program. Any of the following courses can fulfill this requirement: CTL1018H, CTL1041H, CTL1306H, CTL1810H, CTL1842H, CTL3019H, CTL3033H CTL3800H, CTL3803H, CTL3807HCTL3810H, JOI1287H, JOI1288H, APD1296HAPD3202HAPD3228H, SJE1905H.

A student wishing to propose an alternative course to fulfill one of the course requirements will be required to obtain the approval of the program coordinator and either their faculty advisor or thesis supervisor.  

For the flexible-time PhD program option, a minimum residency of four years of full-time registration is required at the beginning of the program, during which time candidates are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete course requirements, the comprehensive examination, prepare a thesis proposal and form a thesis committee. Candidates may apply for part-time status after this four year residency.  

Full-time PhD students must complete their degree within six years and flexible-time PhD students within eight years. All doctoral students must register continuously until all degree requirements have been fulfilled. Students cannot transfer between the full-time and flexible-time PhD options.

Master of Teaching

Master of Teaching

The program involves two years of full-time study leading to a Master of Teaching (MT) degree. Upon successful completion of this program, students will be recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for an Ontario Teachers' Certificate of Qualification, which qualifies them to teach in either the Primary and Junior (P/J) divisions, the Junior and Intermediate (J/I) divisions or the Intermediate and Senior (I/S) divisions of Ontario schools.

The Master of Teaching program offers students a unique educational opportunity, which combines teacher qualification with advanced study of educational theory and an opportunity to conduct research. The program provides students with a strong grounding in curriculum; human development; ethics and educational law; equity diversity and inclusion; indigenous education; educational technology; instructional planning; instructional design; and learning theory. Students enjoy four practice teaching experiences in which they develop their skills as teachers and extend the theoretical and practical knowledge that they have acquired in the academic portion of the program.  

The program includes: formal coursework, teaching and research seminars, practice teaching, and the Master of Teaching research projects.

NOTE: A satisfactory Vulnerable Sector Police Check is required for certification by the Ontario College of Teachers and is required for practice teaching placements in both the first and second year of the program. Students are encouraged to begin the process of obtaining a vulnerable-sector police check before the beginning of the school year. Please see the General Information section for more information.
 

Admission Requirements

Applicants are admitted under SGS general regulations. They must have an appropriate bachelor's degree with standing equivalent to mid-B or better in the final year. Each application should include a resumé, a Statement of Intent, one official transcript of your academic record from each and every postsecondary institution you have attended and two reference letters. In their Statement of Intent, applicants should indicate their preferred division (i.e. P/J, J/I, or I/S) and describe three significant teaching and/or teaching-related experiences that they have had, especially with groups of learners. With reference to these experiences, applicants should identify insights gained about teaching and learning, and explain how, based on these insights, they might contribute to the education of students in today's schools. In their resumé, applicants are asked to list, in chart form, the extent of their teaching experiences. The chart should include dates, location of experience, role, and number of hours working with students. Given the limited number of spaces in this Program, not all eligible applicants can be admitted.  For full application details, please see the MT admissions page at: www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/index.html

Degree Requirements

The 20-month Master of Teaching degree is composed of the equivalent of 20 half-courses, including four practice teaching placements and Master of Teaching research projects. It is undertaken on a full-time basis through the fall and winter academic sessions of the first year, the intervening spring-summer term, and through the fall and winter academic sessions of the second year. Normally, advanced standing is not granted in this program. Graduates are awarded a Master of Teaching degree and are recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for an Ontario Teachers' Certificate of Qualification.

Teaching Divisions

Applicants must select one of the following divisions:

Primary/Junior Division (JK to Grade 6)

Primary/Junior Courses:
(equivalent to 20 half-courses)

CTL7000H Curriculum and Teaching in Literacy
CTL7001H Educational Professionalism, Ethics and the Law
CTL7002H Curriculum and Teaching in Mathematics
CTL7004H Practice Teaching (Year 1)
CTL7005H Practice Teaching (Year 2)
CTL7006H Educational Research 1
CTL7008H Introduction to Special Education and Mental Health
CTL7009H Anti-Discriminatory Education
CTL7010H Issues in Numeracy and Literacy
CTL7011H Child and Adolescent Development and Learning
CTL7014H Fundamentals of Teaching and Learning
CTL7015H Educational Research 2
CTL7016H Integrating Technology into the Classroom: Issues and Activities
CTL7017H Curriculum and Teaching in Music, Dance and Drama
CTL7018H Curriculum and Teaching in Science and Environmental Education 
CTL7019H Supporting English Language Learners
CTL7071H Curriculum and Teaching in Visual Arts and Physical Education 
CTL7072H Curriculum and Teaching in Social Studies and Aboriginal Education
CTL7100H Mathematics Concepts for Elementary Teacher Candidates* (non-credit)

Plus two electives

* Students registered in the Primary/Junior division are required to successfully complete the non-credit seminar course CTL7100H Mathematics Concepts for Elementary Teacher Candidates, also known as MathPlus, during their first session of registration.
 

Junior/Intermediate Division (Grade 4 to Grade 10)

Junior/Intermediate Courses:
(equivalent to 20 half-courses)

CTL7000H Curriculum and Teaching in Literacy
CTL7001H Educational Professionalism, Ethics and the Law
CTL7002H Curriculum and Teaching in Mathematics
CTL7004H Practice Teaching (Year 1)
CTL7005H Practice Teaching (Year 2)
CTL7006H Educational Research 1
CTL7008H Introduction to Special Education and Mental Health
CTL7009H Anti-Discriminatory Education
CTL7010H Issues in Numeracy and Literacy
CTL7011H Child and Adolescent Development and Learning
CTL7013H Arts in Education
CTL7014H Fundamentals of Teaching and Learning
CTL7015H Educational Research 2
CTL7016H Integrating Technology into the Classroom: Issues and Activities
CTL7018H Curriculum and Teaching in Science and Environmental Education
CTL7019H Supporting English Language Learners
CTL7072H Curriculum and Teaching in Social Studies and Aboriginal Education​
CTL7100H Mathematics Concepts for Elementary Teacher Candidates* (non-credit)

Plus one subject specialization course (from CTL7050H to CTL7060H)

Plus two electives

* Students registered in the Junior/Intermediate division are required to successfully complete the non-credit seminar course CTL 7100H Mathematics Concepts for Elementary Teacher Candidates, also known as MathPlus, during their first session of registration.

In the Junior/Intermediate certification program, students take one subject specialization course in year two (list of subject specializations subject to change):

J/I Subject Specialization Courses
CTL7050H Intermediate Teaching Subject - English (First Language)
CTL7051H Intermediate Teaching Subject - French (Second Language)
CTL7052H Intermediate Teaching Subject - Geography
CTL7053H Intermediate Teaching Subject - Health and Physical Education
CTL7054H Intermediate Teaching Subject - History
CTL7055H Intermediate Teaching Subject - Mathematics
CTL7056H Intermediate Teaching Subject - Music - Instrumental
CTL7057H Intermediate Teaching Subject - Music - Vocal
CTL7058H Intermediate Teaching Subject - Science - General 
CTL7059H Intermediate Teaching Subject - Visual Arts
CTL7060H Intermediate Teaching Subject - Drama

Prerequisites
Before applying to the Junior/Intermediate concentration, applicants must ensure that they have the required number of prerequisite courses for the teaching subject. For a list of J/I subject specializations and their required prerequisites, consult the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of the Master of Teaching webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html

Intermediate/Senior Division (Grades 7 to 12)

Intermediate/Senior Courses
(equivalent to 20 half-courses)

CTL7004H Practice Teaching (Year 1)
CTL7005H Practice Teaching (Year 2)
CTL7006H Educational Research 1
CTL7007H Authentic Assessment
CTL7008H Introduction to Special Education and Adaptive Instruction
CTL7009H Anti-Discriminatory Education
CTL7011H Child and Adolescent Development and Learning
CTL7014H Fundamentals of Teaching and Learning
CTL7015H Educational Research 2
CTL7016H Integrating Technology into the Classroom: Issues and Activities
CTL7019H Supporting English Language Learners
CTL7070H Issues in Environment Education
CTL7073H Indigenous Experiences of Racism and Settler Colonialism in Canada: An Introduction
CTL7074H Issues in Educational Law, Policy and Ethics

Plus two subject specialization courses (CTL7020Y to CTL7041Y)

Plus two electives 

I/S Specialization Courses

The Intermediate/Senior students must have two subject specializations. Students must select one subject specialization from the following list as their first subject specialization and one as their second subject specialization (list of subject specializations is subject to change):

CTL7020Y Curriculum and Teaching in English
CTL7021Y Curriculum and Teaching in History
CTL7022Y Curriculum and Teaching in Mathematics
CTL7023Y Curriculum and Teaching in Science: Biology
CTL7024Y Curriculum and Teaching in Science: Chemistry
CTL7025Y Curriculum and Teaching in Science: Physics
CTL7026Y Curriculum and Teaching in Science: General  
CTL7027Y Curriculum and Teaching in Social Sciences - General
CTL7028Y Curriculum and Teaching in Geography
CTL7029Y Curriculum and Teaching in Music: Instrumental
CTL7030Y Curriculum and Teaching in Music: Vocal  
CTL7031Y Curriculum and Teaching in Health and Physical Education
CTL7032Y Curriculum and Teaching in Visual Arts
CTL7033Y Curriculum and Teaching in Dramatic Arts 
CTL7034Y Curriculum and Teaching in French as a Second Language   
CTL7041Y Curriculum and Teaching in Religious Education    

Prerequisites
Before applying to the Intermediate/Senior concentration, applicants must ensure that they have the required number of prerequisite courses for the teaching subjects. For a list of I/S subject specializations and their required prerequisites, consult the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of the Master of Teaching webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html

Religious Education

All Master of Teaching candidates interested in teaching in the Roman Catholic Separate School system can choose to take the Teaching in Catholic Schools Religious Education course through the OISE Continuing and Professional Learning office. This course is required by the Catholic Boards as a prerequisite for a job interview and as a condition of employment. This course is offered in the first year of the Master of Teaching program and is in addition to the degree’s program requirements. Contact the OISE Continuing and Professional Learning office for information.


Combined Degree Programs 

The Master of Teaching Combined Degree Program (CDP) is designed for University of Toronto students interested in studying the intersections of their Bachelor’s degree specialization, coupled with professional teacher preparation.  

For a general description of CDPs, see the School of Graduate Studies General Regulations section 1.4​.3.

The following Combined Degree Programs are offered:

Bachelor of Kinesiology  / Master of Teaching

The Combined Degree Program (CDP): STG (St. George), Bachelor of Kinesiology/Master of Teaching is designed for students interested in studying the intersections of kinesiology and education, coupled with professional teacher preparation.

Students earn a Bachelor of Kinesiology (BKin) degree from the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education and an accredited professional Master of Teaching (MT) degree at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE). They will be recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for an Ontario Teacher’s Certificate of Qualifications as elementary or secondary school teachers. Distinct advantages include:

This CDP permits the completion of both degrees in six years with 1.0 credit (full-course equivalent) that may be counted towards both the undergraduate and graduate degrees.

Further Information:
For more information about this Combined Degree Program, visit the School of Graduate Studies Calendar.

Bachelor of Physical and Health Education / Master of Teaching 

The Combined Degree Program (CDP): STG (St. George), Bachelor of Physical and Health Education/Master of Teaching is designed for students interested in studying the intersections of kinesiology and education, coupled with professional teacher preparation.

Students earn a Bachelor of Physical and Health Education (BPHE) degree from the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education and an accredited professional Master of Teaching (MT) degree at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE). They will be recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for an Ontario Teacher’s Certificate of Qualifications as elementary or secondary school teachers. Distinct advantages include:

This CDP permits the completion of both degrees in six years with 1.0 credit (full-course equivalent) that may be counted towards both the undergraduate and graduate degrees.

Further Information:
For more information about this Combined Degree Program, visit the School of Graduate Studies Calendar.

Bachelor of Music, Stream in Music Education / Master of Teaching

The Combined Degree program (CDP) Bachelor of Music, Stream in Music Education/Master of Teaching is designed for University of Toronto Music Education students who are interested in pursuing a teaching career to gain early (conditional) graduate admission to the Master of Teaching (MT) program.

Students who successfully complete the Combined Degree Program, will earn a bachelor’s degree and an accredited professional MT degree, and will be recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for an Ontario Teacher’s Certificate of Qualifications as elementary or secondary school teachers.

Distinct advantages include: 

The CDP permits the completion of both degrees in six years with 1.0 credit (full-course equivalent) that may be counted towards both the undergraduate and graduate degrees.

Further Information:
For more information about this Combined Degree Program, visit the School of Graduate Studies Calendar.

Honours Bachelor of Science (HBSc) or Honours Bachelor of Arts (HBA) (Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Toronto) with Minor in Education and Society / Master of Teaching

The Combined Degree Programs for Honours Bachelor of Science and Honours Bachelor of Arts students who are enrolled in a Minor in Education and Society (Victoria College) and the OISE Master of Teaching are designed for students interested in studying the intersections of English, History, Mathematics, Psychology, or Sociology and Education, coupled with professional teacher preparation.

Students earn an honour’s bachelor’s degree from the Faculty of Arts and Science and an accredited professional Master of Teaching (MT) degree at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE). They will be recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for an Ontario Teacher’s Certificate of Qualifications as elementary or secondary school teachers. Distinct advantages include: 

The CDP listed below permits the completion of both degrees in six years with 1.0 full-course equivalent (full-course equivalent) that may be counted towards both the undergraduate and graduate degrees.

Every combination of degree programs listed below is understood as a unique Combined Degree Program.

The Combined Degree Programs between the Faculty of Arts and Science and OISE are:

Please note: Students must be enrolled in the Education and Society Minor Program at Victoria College.

Further Information:
For more information about Combined Degree Programs between the Faculty of Arts and Science and OISE, visit the School of Graduate Studies Calendar.

UTM, Honours Bachelor of Science / Honours Bachelor of Arts / Master of Teaching

The Combined Degree Programs (CDP) in Honours Bachelor of Science or Honours Bachelor of Arts / Master of Teaching is designed for students interested in pursuing professional teacher preparation.

Students earn a bachelor’s degree from UTM and an accredited professional Master of Teaching (MT) degree at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE). They will be recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for an Ontario Teacher’s Certificate of Qualifications as elementary or secondary school teachers.

Distinct advantages include:

The CDP listed below permits the completion of both degrees in six years with 1.0 credit (FCE) that may be counted towards both the undergraduate and graduate degrees.

Every combination of degree programs listed below is understood as a unique Combined Degree Program.

The Combined Degree Programs between UTM and OISE are:

Further Information:
For more information about Combined Degree Programs between UTM and OISE, visit the School of Graduate Studies Calendar.

UTSC, Honours Bachelor of Science / Honours Bachelor of Arts / Master of Teaching

The Combined Degree Programs in Honours Bachelor of Science or Honours Bachelor of Arts programs at University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) and the OISE Master of Teaching are designed for students interested in studying the intersections of the Physical sciences, Mathematical sciences, or French and Education, coupled with professional teacher preparation.  

Students earn a bachelor’s degree from the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) and an accredited professional Master of Teaching (MT) degree at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE). They will be recommended to the Ontario College of Teachers for an Ontario Teacher’s Certificate of Qualifications as elementary or secondary school teachers.

Distinct advantages include:

The CDP listed below permits the completion of both degrees in six years with 1.0 credit (full-course equivalent [FCE]) that may be counted towards both the undergraduate and graduate degrees.

Every combination of degree programs listed below is understood as a unique Combined Degree Program.

The Combined Degree Programs between UTSC and OISE are:

Further Information:
For more information about Combined Degree Programs between UTSC and OISE, visit the School of Graduate Studies Calendar.

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Courses


Curriculum Studies & Teacher Development Program Courses
CTL1000H    Foundations of Curriculum/Fondements de l' étude des programmes scolaires

This is a required course for master's students (and doctoral students who did not take it in their masters programs). The aim of this course is to apply theory and research to the study of curriculum and teaching. The course (a) provides a language for conceptualizing educational questions; (b) reviews the major themes in the literature; c) provides a framework for thinking about curriculum changes and change; and (d) assists students in developing critical and analytical skills appropriate to the scholarly discussion of curriculum and teaching problems.

Ce cours fait partie des cours requis pour l'obtention de la maîtrise. Il est également requis pour les étudiant(e)s du doctorat du programme CSTD ne l'ayant pas complété plus tôt pendant leur programme de maîtrise. Le but de ce cours est d'appliquer la théorie et la recherche à l'étude des programmes d'enseignement. Le cours (1) fournit un langage propice à la conceptualisation ; (2) examine les principaux thèmes traités dans la littérature ; (3) fournit un cadre qui porte à réfléchir aux changements à apporter aux programmes d'enseignement ; et (4) aide les étudiant(e)s à développer un esprit critique et analytique approprié à la discussion des problèmes rencontrés dans les programmes d'enseignement.

G. Feuerverger, K. Gallagher, R. Gaztambide-Fernandez, P. Trifonas, or Staff

CTL1007H    Communities of Learning: Teachers constructing professional knowledge

This course theorizes and operationalizes teacher development in a social and cultural structure: teacher book clubs. The course organizes teacher book clubs as communities of learners to socially and interdependently explore the construction of knowledge and relational learning, the related concept of communities of learners and, narrative as an heuristic for making sense and developing meaning. By integrating the three theoretical orientations, the course seeks to help teachers more fully understand how they learn, think, and develop their professional knowledge and identity. The class is organized into book clubs so that the collective membership, through their own practices and theorizing, develop a praxis for including communities of learners in school settings.

M. Kooy

CTL1011H    Anti-Oppression Education in School Settings/L’éducation pour l’anti-oppression en milieu scolaire

In this course we will identify ways that systems of oppression and oppressive educational practices manifest themselves in school settings - for example, within interactions between teachers and students; administrators and students; students and students; students and the curriculum; teachers and the curriculum; administrators and teachers; teachers and parents; parents and administrators - and we will discuss how we can use these spaces or locate new ones to do anti-oppressive educational work in school settings. Emphasis in the course will be placed on integrating anti-oppressive educational theory with anti-oppressive educational practice. We will attempt to link our discussions of practice to theory and our discussions of theory to practice.

Ce cours identifiera comment les systèmes d’oppression et les pratiques éducatives oppressives se manifestent au sein des milieux scolaires – par exemple, dans les interactions entre personnel enseignant et élèves, personnel administratif et personnel enseignant, élèves et élèves, élèves et le programme scolaire, le personnel enseignant et le programme scolaire, le personnel enseignant et les parents, les parents et le personnel administratif – et nous abordons comment nous pouvons nous servir de ces espaces ou en créer des nouveaux par le biais des pratiques éducatives axées sur l’anti-oppression. Nous tenterons de lier nos discussions de la pratique à la théorie et nos discussions de la théorie à la pratique. Le cours abordera des stratégies d’anti-oppression liées à la différence sociale en milieu scolaire, notamment le genre, la classe sociale, la race, l’identité sexuelle, l’âge, l’handicap, la langue, la nationalité et d’autres distinctions qui influent sur la participation des acteurs scolaires et leur approche à la participation.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken CTL7009H are prohibited from taking this course.
T. Goldstein

CTL1012H    Curriculum for Girls and Young Women: Historical and Contemporary Issues

This course will examine how appropriate curriculum for the education of girls and young women has been defined and delivered in Canadian schools.

E. Smyth

CTL1014H    Evaluation of Curriculum and Instruction [RM]

This course serves as an introduction to the strategies and techniques utilized in the evaluation of curriculum programs. The focus will be on the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses associated with various strategies. Students will work through evaluation problems associated with particular curriculum programs and instructional techniques.

Staff

CTL1016H    Cooperative Learning Research and Practice

This course provides for practical experience of as well as understanding of innovative practices in cooperative learning (CL). We explore rationales for and current developments (synergy, shared leadership). Topics include: What is CL (principles, attributes); how to organize CL (structures and strategies); how does CL work (basic elements, types of groups); teacher and student roles; benefits (positive interdependence, individual accountability, social skills, cohesion); evaluation (forms and criteria); obstacles and problems; starting and applying CL in your classroom (teachers' practical knowledge; collegiality; parental involvement); independent learning and collaborative inquiry; Ministry and Board requirements; and resources and materials Group (response trios) projects and joint seminars.

Staff

CTL1018H    Introduction to Qualitative Inquiry in Curriculum, Teaching and Learning [RM]

Experiential learning for students new to qualitative inquiry is provided through a broad introduction to qualitative approaches from beginning to end. A range of approaches relating to students' theoretical frameworks are explored. Thesis students are encouraged to pilot their thesis research.

K. Cooper, J. Wallace, J. Hewitt, Staff

CTL1019H    Authentic Assessment

In this course candidates will formulate a personal policy on student assessment, develop authentic assessment tools appropriate to their teaching assignments, and assess the quality of authentic assessment strategies. Particular attention will be given to performance assessments, portfolios, self-evaluation, cooperative assessment, student beliefs and attitudes toward assessment, measurement of affective outcomes and professional standards for evaluating student assessment practices.

Staff

CTL1020H    Teaching High Ability Students

This course will critically analyze a number of curriculum models and will explore instructional strategies currently used to program for high ability students in a variety of learning environments. Specific reference will be made to program differentiation within a regular classroom setting. Previous courses in the education of high ability students is not required.

E. Smyth

CTL1024H    Poststructuralism and Education

This course will examine the foundations of educational thought from the perspectives of Jacques Derrida, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Luce Irigaray, Hélène Cixous, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, Gilles Deleuze, Julia Kristeva, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jean Baudrillard. Educational implications and applications of poststructural philosophy will be stressed in relation to the discursive and non-discursive limits of the scene of teaching.

P. Trifonas, Staff

CTL1026H    Improving Teaching

A critical review of current approaches to analysing teaching and an examination of theoretical literature on the concept of teaching. The course involves reflection on one's own teaching. Students should be currently teaching or have access to a teaching situation. This course is most suitable for primary and secondary teachers.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL4000H are prohibited from taking this course
Staff

CTL1027H    Facilitating Reflective Professional Development

Reflective practice is one means through which practitioners make site-based decisions and through which they continue to learn in their professions. This course will critically examine the research and professional literature concerning the meaning of and the processes involved in reflective practice. Additionally, as professional development is often associated with reflective practice, the course will also identify and examine professional development strategies which could facilitate reflective professional development. Students will critique these models by utilizing the concepts from the reflective practice literature.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL4001H are prohibited from taking this course
Staff

CTL1029H    From Student to Teacher: Professional Induction

This course critically examines the various conceptual and structural approaches to teacher education, including an inquiry-based, transformative orientation. Participants engage in their own inquiries, exploring the ways in which they construct professional knowledge in their own lives, and in which other professionals in transition participate in their professional development. Theoretical perspectives, research methodologies and research findings are discussed for the purposes of deepening our understandings of our current teaching and research practices, and of engaging in the ongoing construction and reconstruction of professional knowledge.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL4004H are prohibited from taking this course
M. Kooy

CTL1031H    Language, Culture, and Identity: Using the Literary Text in Teacher Development

The literary text is used as a vehicle for reflection on issues of language and ethnic identity maintenance and for allowing students an opportunity to live vicariously in other ethnocultural worlds. The focus is on autobiographical narrative within diversity as a means to our understanding of the ''self'' in relation to the ''other''. The course examines the complex implications of understanding teacher development as autobiographical/biographical text. We then extend this epistemological investigation into more broadly conceived notions of meaning-making that incorporate aesthetic and moral dimensions within the multicultural/anti-racist/anti-bias teacher educational enterprise.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL4007 are prohibited from taking this course
G. Feuerverger

CTL1032H    Knowing and Teaching

This course examines how knowledge is developed, explores the relationships among different kinds of knowledge (e.g., moral, scientific, religious, aesthetic), and identifies the various philosophical bases of such school subjects as English, history, and math. It examines the relationship between issues about knowing and issues about teaching. For example, the questions of what and how we should teach are addressed from the standpoint of different kinds of ''knowing.'' The course is oriented toward secondary school but is not confined to any particular subject-matter specialty. It is not assumed that students will have a background in philosophy.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL4008 are prohibited from taking this course
Staff

CTL1033H    Multicultural Perspectives in Teacher Development: Reflective Practicum

This course will focus on the dynamics of multiculturalism within the individual classroom and their implications for teacher development. It is intended to examine how teachers can prepare themselves in a more fundamental way to reflect on their underlying personal attitudes toward the multicultural micro-society of their classrooms. Discussions will be concerned with the interaction between personal life histories and the shaping of assumptions about the teaching-learning experience, especially in the multicultural context. The course will have a ''hands-on'' component, where students (whether practising teachers or teacher/researchers) will have the opportunity to become participant-observers and reflect upon issues of cultural and linguistic diversity within the classroom.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL4009 are prohibited from taking this course
G. Feuerverger

CTL1037H    Teacher Development: Comparative and Cross-Cultural Perspectives

In this course we explore differences in the ways ''Knowledge'', ''Teaching'', and ''Learning'' are constructed and understood in different cultures, and how these affect how teachers learn and promote learning, with particular emphasis on multicultural settings. An underlying theme is how one can best bring together a) narrative, and b) comparative/structural ways of knowing in order to better understand teacher development in varying cultural/national contexts. The choice of particular nations/regions/cultures on which to focus in the course responds to the experience and interest of the students and the availability of useful literature regarding a particular geo-cultural area with respect to the basic themes of the course.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL4013 are prohibited from taking this course
Staff

CTL1038H    Change and Curriculum Implementation

This course examines the nature of educational change and its impact on the implementation of curriculum. How change affects teachers and how new curricula affect classroom practice, form the central focus of the course. Three basic approaches to implementation, the fidelity perspective, mutual adaptation, and curriculum enactment, are used as a framework to examine the research on implementation and identify factors which enhance and hinder successful change efforts. The role of professional development and strategies for effective professional development practices in support of implementation constitute the third area of study in this course.

Staff

CTL1040H    Fundamentals of Program Planning and Evaluation [RM]

This course is organized around the various components of program planning and evaluation for education and the social and health sciences; needs, evaluability, process, implementation, outcome, impact, and efficiency assessments. Data collection methods such as the survey, focus group interview and observation are introduced.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL2006 are prohibited from taking this course
T. Lam, Staff

CTL1041H    Research Methods in Education [RM] / Introduction à la recherche empirique en éducation

Basic concepts, methods, and problems in educational research are considered: discovering the periodicals in one's field, steps in the research process, developing research questions, design of instruments, methods of data collection and analysis, interpreting results, and writing research reports.

L'objectif général de ce cours est de développer chez les étudiantes et les étudiants les outils qui faciliteront la lecture critique de la recherche empirique en éducation. Les concepts de base, les méthodes et les problèmes pertinents à la recherche seront abordés en fonction des thèmes suivants: les étapes d'un processus de recherche, la formulation d'hypothèses, la conception et l'élaboration des instruments de recherche, les méthodes de cueillette de données, l'interprétation des résultats et la rédaction de rapports de recherche.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL2007H are prohibited from taking this course
T. Lam, Staff

CTL1045H    Survey Research

The course studies survey research design and questionnaire development. Topics include single and multiple waves research designs, sampling strategies, data collection methods (mail, telephone, computer administered, and individual and group interviews), non-response issues, questionnaire construction and validation, and sources of errors in self-reporting. Course content relating to the use of questionnaire as a form of data collection applies to research designs other than survey research. Teaching and learning will be conducted through reading, lecturing, class and internet discussion, and take-home and in class individual or small group exercises.

T. Lam

CTL1046H    Training Evaluation

This course studies methods of evaluating training. Topics covered by the course include training models, practice analysis, Kirkpatrick's 4 level training outcome evaluation model and its variants, Return on Investment (ROI) analysis, and measurement and design issues in training evaluation.

T. Lam

CTL1047H    Self-Assessment

This course examines the concept of self-assessent and its relationship to learning and other psychological constructs, construction and validation of self-assessment measures, psychometric properties of self-assessment, how learners assess their learning, and how teachers and professionals in social and health services assess the quality and effects of their practices.  The course emphasizes practice as well as theory and research.  Some of the topics include methods of self-assessment; cognitive processes; psychometric issues and sources of bias in self-assessment; correlates of self-assessment; learner self-assessment and teacher or professional self-assesment.

Lam, T.

CTL1048H    Qualitative Methodology: Challenges and Innovations [RM]

Working within a broad discussion of methodology and the problems of theory and praxis particular to a ‘global’, postmodern, and neoliberal era, this course invites students to work through methodological dilemmas, choices and experiments within the context of their own research projects and in conversation with a variety of qualitative methodologists. Readings will propose critical, creative, and collaborative solutions to a range of contemporary qualitative methodology concerns in the field of education today. In particular, the problematics of gender and race, the impact of neoliberal politics on workers and learners, the tensions of local and global, the competing epistemologies of art and science, structural and post-structural, the ethical relations between researchers and research participants, the challenges of ‘representation’, the struggles over claims to truth are some of the subjects to be addressed in the discussion of research design and methodology.

Exclusion: CTL1799H Qualitative Methodology: Challenges and Innovations
Enrolment Limits: 25
K. Gallagher

CTL1049H    Critical Practitioner Research in Education

This course explores inquiry as a methodological stance on practice, a framework for investigating and addressing critical issues in school, classroom, and community-based research. What Cochran-Smith and Lytle (2001; 2009) have theorized as an inquiry stance invites educators to regard educational projects as sites of knowledge generation, occurring within social, historical, cultural, and political contexts. With its emphasis on the intimate relationship between knowledge and practice, this concept foregrounds the role that practitioners can play—individually and collectively—in generating understandings, rich conceptualizations, in the service of enacting new educational possibilities. Taking an inquiry stance involves constructively problematizing conventional educational arrangements, interrogating how knowledge is constructed, evaluated and used in various settings, and re-imagining the roles practitioners might play in actualizing change in their work contexts.

Drawing on this notion of inquiry as stance, this course will explore what it means to be a practitioner researcher in educational institutions and community-based organizations. This course is intended for MA and PhD students interested in exploring the possibilities and the potential of developing new understandings and research within actual educational contexts that they shape daily. This may include a range of initiatives, from developing small-scale studies to inform ongoing practice to developing larger research projects, including practitioner inquiry dissertations. The course will pay particular attention to the conceptual and experiential frameworks that practitioners bring to site-based educational research. We will consider critical practitioner research in relation to other methodological approaches as well as educational conversations about the nature of research, with special consideration of how research might shape practice and inform policy and the potential contributions practitioners can make.

Prerequisite: No prerequisite required. Introductory course on qualitative methodologies recommended.
Rob Simon

CTL1060H    Education and Social Development

This course examines the linkages between education, both formal and non-formal, and the social development of nations, with particular focus on the process of educational policy formation for both developing nations and developing sub-areas within richer nations. The course aims to acquaint students with the main competing ''theories'' or conceptualizations of the development process and, through examination of a representative set of recent empirical studies and ''state of the art'' papers, to develop an understanding of the relationships between educational activities and programs and various aspects of social development, with an overall focus on problems of social inequality. The overarching objective is to help develop a better understanding of how, in confronting a particular educational policy problem, one's own theoretical preconceptions, data about the particular jurisdiction, and comparative data about the problem at hand interact to produce a policy judgment.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL6002 are prohibited from taking this course
Staff

CTL1062H    Performed Ethnography and Research Informed Theatre [RM]

This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn about the arts-based research methods of performed ethnography and research-informed theatre.  Performed ethnography, also known as performance ethnography and ethnodrama, involves turning the findings of ethnographic research into a play script that can be read aloud by a group of participants or performed before audiences.  Performed ethnography can be seen as one kind of research-informed theatre.  Other examples of research-informed theatre we will look at in this course include autobiographical theatre, community theatre, verbatim theatre, documentary theatre, tribunal theatre and history theatre.

Exclusion: CTL5010H Special Topics in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development: Masters Level: Performed Ethnography and Research Informed Theatre [RM]
Enrolment Limits: 25
T. Goldstein

CTL1063H    Pedagogies of Solidarity

Taking as a starting point a conception of pedagogy that centres relational encounters, this course seeks to consider the question of how to enter into relationships with others that seek to transform the very terms that define such relationships. The course explores how the concept of solidarity has been used to both explain the nature of social relationships between groups and individuals, as well as how it has been mobilized as a strategy for political work. In both counts, solidarity plays a key pedagogical role because it seeks to either sustain or challenge particular social arrangements. The course takes education and educational experience as a particular site for thinking through solidarity as both explanation and strategy, and considers a range of educational situations, including the classroom, to consider the complexities of solidarity as ethical encounters in pedagogical relations.

Enrolment Limits: 25
R. Gaztambide-Fernandez

CTL1064H    Applied Theatre and Performance in Sites of Learning

This course will examine the research of, and different approaches to, applied and socially engaged theatre. Practitioners engaged in forms of applied theatre, such as drama in education, theatre for development, Verbatim theatre, participatory theatre etc. often believe creating and witnessing theatrical events can make a difference to the way people interact with one another and with the world at large. The ‘social turn’ in theatre is understood politically, artistically, and educationally to be in the service of social change, although there is certainly no single nor consistent ideological position that supports the expansive use of theatre in classrooms and communities. Theatre has been consistently used in formal and informal educational settings as a way to galvanize participation and make learning more relational, or more a student/participant-centred rather than teacher/facilitator- centred proposition. In addition to exploring the educational value of applied theatre in a range of contexts and through a variety of interventions and intentions, the course will also contemplate the ethics and poetics of representation in performance and in research.

Exclusion: CTL1799H Applied Theatre and Performance in Sites of Learning
Enrolment Limits: 25
K. Gallagher

CTL1065H    Approaches to Anti-Homophobia and Anti-Transphobia Education

This course will focus on matters of equity, inclusion, and school reform as these pertain to differences of sexual orientation and gender identity among students in elementary and secondary schools. Course content and instruction will focus on understanding and addressing educational and schooling issues confronting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and queer (LGBTQ) students.  It will also explore strategies and resources for challenging homophobia, heterosexism, and transphobia in classrooms and schools. We will examine the ways homophobia, heterosexism, and transphobia intersect with multiple identities, other forms of oppression and our history of white settler colonialism.  We will also examine curriculum materials and community support services that promote sensitivity, visibility and social justice.

Enrolment Limits: 25
T. Goldstein

CTL1099H    Critical Approaches to Arts-Based Research [RM]

This course examines how creative practices can be employed to generate innovative research in the humanities and social sciences. Course participants will analyze current debates on representation, rationale, and ethics, and in particular they will examine how arts-based practices/processes can move educational research towards more critical, democratic, and participatory forms of research by attending to issues of social justice and equity.

S. Springgay

CTL1104H    Play, Drama, and Arts Education

The examination of current topics or problems in play, drama, and arts education as related to curriculum studies. Issues will be identified from all age levels of education as well as from dramatic play, each of the arts disciplines, and aesthetic education as a whole. Students will address one specific topic through self-directed learning and present the results in an appropriate form. Topics vary from year to year depending upon interests of course members.

Staff

CTL1105H    Research and Inquiry in Arts Education

The course examines a variety of narrative and arts-based approaches to research and professional practices. Narrative is explored both as a fundamental form of experience and as a collection of methods used for the study of experience. Course participants will engage in narrative, self-study research, in the review of completed narrative and arts-based theses and dissertations, and in the creation of practical research proposals.

M. Beattie

CTL1106H    Spirituality in Education

This course examines the nature of spirituality. After exploring various conceptions of spirituality the course then examines how it can be part of the school curriculum in a non threatening manner. More specifically, the course explores the nature of the soul and how the soul can be nourished in the classroom through approaches such as imagery, dreams, journal writing, and forms of contemplation. The arts and earth education are also examined in this context. Finally the role of the teacher will be explored.

J. Miller

CTL1110H    The Holistic Curriculum

This course will focus on curriculum that facilitates personal growth and social change. Various programs and techniques that reflect a holistic orientation will be analysed: for example, Waldorf education, social action programs, and transpersonal techniques such as visualization and the use of imagery in the classroom. The philosophical, psychological, and social context of the holistic curriculum will also be examined.

J. Miller

CTL1112H    Expressive Writing: Practice and Pedagogy

This course focuses on the pragmatics of expressive writing in a range of pedagogical settings.  Students will experience the ways in which a range of styles and modes of expressive writing operate in various prose forms including personal narratives, arguments, evaluations, interviews, and reports. Students will consider the implications of this expressivist pedagogy for educational practice from elementary to post-secondary learning. Students will work both independently and collaboratively. Assessment will be portfolio-based.

G. Allen

CTL1115H    Teacher Education and the Construction of Professional Knowledge: Holistic Perspectives

The course will focus on teacher education and the construction of professional knowledge in teaching from holistic perspectives. Beginning with an exploration of the various conceptual and structural alternatives to initial teacher education, the course then examines holistic, arts-based and narrative orientations to learning to teach and to career-long teacher learning. The connections between professional renewal, curriculum and school renewal, and educational research are explored.

Staff

CTL1116H    Holistic Education Approaches in Elementary School Mathematics

This course is designed for elementary school teachers interested in experiencing math teaching as a creative and deeply satisfying endeavour. Through class discussions, reflection activities, creative group investigations, selected readings and a final (usually classroom-based) project, participants will be able to explore topics from among the following: holistic math learning environments; linking math with real life; creative problem-solving; open-ended problems; integrating math with other disciplines such as fine arts, social studies and language arts; journal writing, use of children's literature and oral communication activities; authentic assessment; with instruction.

Staff

CTL1119H    Gaining Confidence in Mathematics: Reconstructing Mathematics Knowledge and Overcoming Anxiety (K-8)

It has been well documented that many adults experience mathematics anxiety, possibly due to the traditional way they have been taught math in their own schooling. This course utilizes a holistic approach in helping elementary teachers to reconstruct their foundational math knowledge and overcome their anxieties. Utilizing reform-based approaches, participants will work in small groups on selected mathematics problems and hands-on explorations at an appropriate level of difficulty. Journal writing, group reflection and guided visualization activities will be used to help participants become aware of, and start dealing with their emotional and cognitive blocks in relation to mathematics. Such work opens the door to accessing one's mathematical intuition and creativity. A discussion of how the strategies used in the course, or reported in the literature, can be adapted for mathematics-anxious students will also be included.

Staff

CTL1120H    Effective Teaching Strategies in Elementary Mathematics Education: Research and Practice

During this highly interactive course, graduate students will investigate in depth, current research on effective teaching strategies in elementary mathematics focusing on student communication and its implications for classroom practice. This course will also provide opportunities for graduate students to deepen their understanding of the research literature through hands-on activities, student work samples, and classroom-researched videos. We will examine the research related to student discourse and communication in order to explore not only students’ understanding of mathematical concepts, but also the use of mathematical language and the social interactions that take place between students. No experience in teaching mathematics or previous coursework related to mathematics is required.

C. Marks Krpan

CTL1202H    Mathematics in the School Curriculum: Elementary

This course examines what mathematics should be taught, how to define and increase students' understanding of mathematics, classroom discourse and student engagement in elementary mathematics. The intent of the course is to provide a grounding in mathematics education.

D. McDougall

CTL1206H    Teaching and Learning Science

This course involves a study of theories of learning in the context of science education, a survey of research relating to children's understanding of concepts in science, and an exploration of strategies for more effective science teaching.

Staff

CTL1207H    Teaching and Learning about Science: Issues and Strategies in Science, Technology, Society and Environment (STSE) Education

A detailed study of issues in the history, philosophy, and sociology of science that have significance for science education, an examination of the philosophy underpinning the STS movement, and a consideration of some of the theoretical and practical problems surrounding the implementation of science curricula intended to focus on environmental, socioeconomic, cultural, and moral-ethical issues.

E. Pedretti

CTL1209H    Current Issues in Science and Technology Education

The course focuses on the design of effective strategies for exploring students' personal frameworks of meaning in science and addresses issues of contemporary international debate about science and technology education, including the ''Science for All'' movement, the ''new'' psychology of learning, the language of science and technology education, politicization of science and technology education, the role of laboratory work, computers in science education, and issues in environmental and health education.

Staff

CTL1212H    Curriculum Making in Science: Some Considerations in the History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science

This course will address some key issues in the philosophy and the sociology of science and their implications for science education at the elementary and secondary levels. Attention will also be directed towards (i) a critical appraisal of the role of the history of science in science education , and (ii) a consideration of pseudosciences and their role, and the distortion and misuse of science for sociopolitical goals. Course members will have the opportunity to explore ways in which lab work, computer-mediated learning, language activities and historical case studies can be used to present a more authentic view of science, scientific development and scientific practice.

Staff

CTL1214H    Equity Issues in Science Education

This course deals with issues of gender bias, Eurocentrism and other forms of bias and distortion in science and science-technology education. It seeks a generalized approach to equity issues and examines ways in which border crossings into the subcultures of science and science education can be eased for all those who currently experience difficulties.

Staff

CTL1215H    Teaching and Learning about Science and Technology: Beyond Schools

This course will focus on theoretical and practical perspectives and current research on teaching and learning science and technology in school and non-school settings. Consideration will be given to classroom environments, as well as science centres, zoos, aquaria, museums, out-door centres, botanical gardens, science fairs, science hobby clubs, and media experiences. In particular, the course will focus on the nature of teaching and learning in these diverse settings, representations of science and technology, scientific and technological literacy, and socio-cultural interpretations of science and technology.

E. Pedretti

CTL1216H    Teacher Leadership in Science, Mathematics and Technology Education

This course will focus on the role of the teacher leader in developing the teacher as learner in the context of science, mathematics and technology education. Topics will include the nature of teacher's work, the construction of teacher's knowledge, forms of teacher inquiry and reflection, providing feedback on teaching and the social organizational conditions of schools, which support teacher leadership and learning. During the course, participants will be required to interview a colleague, and to arrange access to a classroom or instructional setting to conduct some action research on their own leadership by observing and providing feedback to another teacher, instructor or colleague.

J. Wallace

CTL1217H    Integrating Science, Mathematics and Technology Curricula

This course focuses on curriculum issues associated with integrating school science, mathematics and technology. Participants will examine the contemporary literature on curriculum integration. Topics include the history of curriculum integration and school subjects, theoretical and practical models for integration, strategies for teaching in an integrated fashion, student learning in integrated school settings, models for school organization, and curriculum implementation issues. During the course, participants will be required to interview a colleague, and to arrange access to a classroom or instructional setting to conduct some action research on their own integrated teaching practices.

J. Wallace

CTL1218H    Culture and Cognition in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education

This course explores the fundamentally cultural nature of all learning, but specifically learning of mathematics, science, and technology disciplines. The course is roughly split into three major sections. We begin with a brief overview of cultural-historical approaches to understanding learning and cognition. These theoretical frameworks begin with the assumption that cognition is fundamentally social and cultural, always grounded in activity, practices and communities. Secondly, we will focus on empirical research on mathematical, scientific and technological thinking in various contexts, ranging from elementary school mathematics classes to grocery shopping to carpet laying to theoretical physics. Finally, using the theoretical and empirical work as a foundation, we will study approaches to instruction based on the assumption that all learning is cultural.

I. Esmonde

CTL1219H    Making Secondary Mathematics Meaningful

Various approaches to making mathematics meaningful for, and accessible to intermediate and senior level students will be examined in the light of recent developments in the field and the Ontario mathematics curriculum guidelines. Throughout the course, we will focus on the question 'making mathematics meaningful for whom,' so an equity focus will pervade each week's readings and discussions. Topics may include: Streaming and school structures, the use of open-ended problems, identity issues, building on community knowledge, classroom discourse, and assessment.

I. Esmonde

CTL1220H    Sociocultural Theories of Learning

This course is an introduction to sociocultural theories of learning, including both historical and contemporary views on how culture, society and history influence the nature of learning. We will begin with Vygotsky and activity theory, and then consider a broad spectrum of current views that draw on this work.

I. Esmonde

CTL1221H    Education for Human Goals Local and Global: How is Science Education Helping?

The role of science education in positively impacting life conditions globally is perhaps the most intriguing and urgent problem for science education. In this regard, a recurring theme in local and international deliberations on science education is the role of school science in social, economic, and cultural conditions, that is, in everyday life. This course will facilitate a systematic analysis of the role of school science in everyday life along five themes: The context for the issues that pertain to science education and social economic development; Emergent constructs for school science; How people learn and knowledge transfer; The realities of science teaching and learning; The notion of knowledge, school science, other sciences, and social economic development; and, Historical reflections and critique of the science education endeavor.

W. Gitari

CTL1222H    Environmental Studies in Science, Mathematics and Technology Education

In this course we will explore teaching and learning about environmental education (EE) through science, mathematics and technology education. Environmental education is a particularly timely topic given the recent changes to Ontario curriculum and the renewed interest in environmental issues nationally and internationally. Central to this course is a commitment to a teaching and learning continuum that includes the use of schools, school grounds, the local and broader community, and outdoor education centres. All of these ‘places’ become contexts in which educators can explore environmental education. In this course, we will attempt to link our discussions to the theory and practice of EE education.  Specifically, we will examine the notion of environmental literacy and citizenship, current changes in Ontario curriculum and policy, the relationship between EE and nature, sustainable development and social justice, place-based education, outdoor education, and EE and Indigenous knowledges. The course also examines the philosophical and ideological orientations and competing frameworks that underpin the EE movement in Canada and elsewhere, and identifies some of the theoretical and practical problems surrounding its implementation.

Enrolment Limits: 25
E. Pedretti

CTL1223H    Activist Science & Technology Education

This course, open to Masters and Doctoral students in education, addresses theory and practice regarding relationships among various powerful individuals and groups in societies (e.g., corporations, transnational organizations, banks, financiers, politicians, think tanks, technologies, advertisements) and fields of professional science and technology regarding the extent to which they may contribute to the wellbeing of individuals, societies and environments. Attention also is paid to citizens’ roles in conducting research and using findings to inform socio-political actions to influence powerful people/groups and fields of science and technology promoting a better world.

L. Bencze

CTL1304H    Cultural Studies and Education/Études culturelles et éducation

The study and concept of ''culture'' has emerged from a number of different disciplines over the past century. ''Cultural studies'' is a recent synthesis and critical re-evaluation of some of these approaches, one with important implications for educators in the area of the humanities. Through a discussion of key texts and issues generated within this tradition, the course examines struc- turalist, ethnographic, feminist, and postmodern versions of cultural studies in order to understand how these approaches reformulate an educational practice concerned with contemporary culture.

La notion de '' culture '' provient de plusieurs disciplines depuis le début du 20e siècle. Les '' études culturelles '' représentent une synthèse récente et une re-évaluation critique de quelques unes de ces approches, en faisant surtout ressortir les retombées pour les professionnels de l'éducation dans le domaine des sciences humaines. Le cours abordera les enjeux générés au sein de cette tradition, surtout en reprenant des textes clés, incluant les médias populaires, les films et les vidéos de langue française, pour examiner les versions structuralistes, ethnographiques, féministes et postmodernes des études culturelles afin de mieux cerner comment ces approches reformulent une pratique enseignante en ce qui se concerne de la culture contemporaine.

Staff

CTL1306H    Qualitative Research Methods in Education: Concepts and Methods [RM] / La recherche qualitative en éducation: bases théoriques et pratiques [RM]

The course is designed to introduce students to qualitative methods of research in education. The intention is to examine the nature of qualitative research and its relationship to theory. Students will look at different ways of approaching qualitative research, and special attention will be paid to the concept of critical ethnography. Students will also study five specific research techniques: observation, interview, content analysis, life history, and action research.

Le cours a pour but d'initier les étudiantes et les étudiants à l'analyse qualitative dans le domaine de la recherche en éducation. Le premier objectif du cours est de se pencher sur la nature même de la recherche qualitative et sa relation avec la théorie. Différentes façons de concevoir la recherche qualitative seront donc examinées. Dans un deuxième temps, les étudiantes et les étudiants se familiariseront avec cinq techniques de cueillette de données: l'observation, l'entrevue, l'analyse de contenu, le récit de vie et la recherche-action.

D. Gérin-Lajoie, Staff

CTL1307H    Identity Construction and Education of Minorities/Identité collective et éducation minoritaire de langue française

The course is designed to examine the contradictory role of the school as an agent of linguistic and social reproduction in a school system where students are from diverse linguistic and cultural origins. In this context, the majority-minorities dichotomy will be critically examined. The course will focus particularly on how school contributes to the students' identity construction process. In this critical examination, identity will be understood as a socially constructed notion. Key-concepts such as identity, ethnicity, minority, race, culture and language will be first analyzed. The process of identity construction will then be examined within the educational context of Ontario.

Le cours a pour but de se pencher sur le rôle de l'école de langue française dans le processus de construction identitaire des élèves. Dans le contexte du cours, l'identité est conçue comme étant le résultat d'une construction sociale. Des concepts-clés tels que l'identité, l'ethnicité, la race, la culture, la langue et l'assimilation sont d'abord examinés. Par la suite, le cours se penche sur les politiques et les programmes existants dans les écoles de langue française en Ontario, dans le but de faire une analyse critique de la contribution de ces dernières au processus de construction identitaire des élèves.

D. Gerin-Lajoie

CTL1312H    Democratic Citizenship Education

Preparation for 'democracy' and citizenship is ostensibly a central goal of public education: What does this citizenship imply, who is heard in 'public' decision making, and how might active democratic citizenship be 'taught' and learned? Diverse individuals, cultures, and nations understand democracy in different ways, and political space is gendered: This course examines contrasting understandings of and approaches to political (governance), social (inclusivity), and transnational (peacebuilding) citizenship, democratization, and citizenship education, drawn from comparative international and Canadian research and cases, especially in school settings. Themes include conflict and controversy, critique, cultural/ gender/ sexual diversities, human rights, justice, development and peacebuilding. Emphasis is given to curriculum, conflict management, and governance in public elementary and secondary schools in various cultural contexts. Participants will learn to analyze and assess educational experiences, in light of theory, research, and their own democratic citizenship education goals.

K. Bickmore

CTL1313H    Gender Equity in the Classroom

This course is designed for practising educators to develop and enhance their knowledge of how gender is produced in our educational system. It examines the different stages of the educational system: elementary, secondary, community college and university. The classroom is the focus because it is the central work setting of educational institutions. What happens in the classroom is not simply the result of what a teacher does but involves interactions between and among students and between teachers and students. The classroom has its own dynamic and is also interconnected to outside relationships with parents, friends, educational officials etc. The course has as its main objectives to examine the dynamics of inequality in the classroom and to discuss and develop strategies for change. While the primary focus is on gender inequality, course readings also draw on resources that make visible the intersections of gender with other inequalities based on race, class and sexual orientation.

Staff

CTL1318H    Teaching Conflict and Conflict Resolution

This seminar examines how young people may be taught (and given opportunities), implicitly or explicitly, to handle interpersonal and social conflict. The course examines the ways conflict may be confronted, silenced, transformed, or resolved in school knowledge, pedagogy, hidden curriculum, peacemaking and peacebuilding programs, governance, discipline, restorative justice, and social relations, from Canadian and international/ comparative perspectives. The focus is to become aware of a range of choices and to analyze how various practices and lessons about conflict fit in (and challenge) the regular activities and assumptions of curriculum and schooling, and their implications for democracy, justice, and social exclusion/ inclusion. Participants will become skilled in analyzing the conflict and relational learning opportunities and dilemmas embedded in various institutional patterns or initiatives to teach or facilitate conflict resolution and transformation and to prevent violence.

K. Bickmore

CTL1319H    Religious Education: Comparative And International Perspectives

This course presents and examines various international and comparative perspectives on religious education within and across Buddhist, Christian, Hindu, Islamic, and Jewish faith communities. We will critically and comparatively engage in the policies, practices, and research on religious education in public and faith-based schools Canada and internationally. No previous knowledge or coursework on religious education is necessary.

Enrolment Limits: 25
S. Niyozov

CTL1320H    Introduction to Aboriginal Land-centered Education: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

This course is designed as an introductory course for both Aboriginal (FNMI) and non-Aboriginal educators and professional practitioners focusing on issues related to teaching and learning in Aboriginal contexts in both urban and rural communities in Canada and more generally across Turtle Island (North America). We will be examining Indigenous ways of knowing and consider the ways this knowledge may inform teaching and professional practices for the benefit of all. Historical, social, and political issues as well as cultural, spiritual and philosophical themes will be examined in relation to developing culturally relevant and responsive curricula, pedagogies and practices. There is a particular emphasis placed on understandings of land and culture as it relates to constructions of the self in relation to education. The course is constructed around three modules. The first module focuses on exploring historical, social and political contexts, background and related factors that have and continue to influence current realities of FNMI students in Canada. The second module of the course focuses on examining where we are now – here in this time – particularly with regard to educational considerations which includes constructions of the self and community engagement. The third module explores some of the ways we might all move forward together in respectful relationships.

S. Styres

CTL1321H    Aboriginal Civilization: Language, Culture and Identity

This course is designed for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal educators and professional practitioners and examines Aboriginal (FNMI) perspectives on language, culture, and identity while looking at how this knowledge can inform teacher and professional practices to the benefit of all learners. In relation to developing culturally relevant and responsive curriculum, pedagogies and professional practices we will explore some of the tangled historical, socio-cultural and - political issues. We will also develop an understanding of FNMI peoples as a complete civilization (a complete way of being in the world) that includes the complex interplay of various aspects of civilization such as culture, literacies, language, arts, architecture, spiritual practices, and philosophical themes. Educators and professional practitioners will come away with enhanced critical thinking skills and active engagement with the issues through discussions and hands-on learning opportunities in order to move forward and be able to create more inclusive, fulfilling learning environments in both urban and rural contexts.

Prerequisite: CTL1320H or permission of instructor.
S. Styres

CTL1322H    Literacies of Land: Narrative, Storying and Literature

This course is designed for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal educators and professional practitioners and examines Aboriginal (FNMI) perspectives on literacies grounded in understandings of Land (capital “L”) while looking at how these literacies can inform teacher and professional practices to the benefit of all learners. In relation to developing culturally relevant and responsive curriculum, pedagogies and professional practices we will explore some of the various literacies and ways to support literacy success in classrooms. We will explore culturally aligned texts, stories, and oral narratives together with symbolically rich themes that support literacies of land as living and emergent. Educators and professional practitioners will come away with enhanced critical thinking skills and active engagement with the issues concerning literacies through discussions and hands-on learning opportunities in order to move forward and be able to create more inclusive, fulfilling learning environments in both urban and rural contexts.

Prerequisite: CTL1320H or permission of instructor.
S. Styres

CTL1325H    Citizenship education, pedagogy, and school communities[36L]

This course is designed to explore and analyze evolving and contrasting characterizations of citizenship education in school communities, primarily in Canada. Particular attention is given to the ways in which teachers translate varying theoretical perspectives and curricular intentions into pedagogical practice as they address such themes as informed citizenship, civic identity, civic literacy, controversial public issues, and community engagement and activism. Instruction for this course includes a mixture of directed and interactive presentations, discussion, and inquiry modes. In doing so, candidates are provided with opportunities to deepen their language of conceptualization, their skills of analysis and critique, and their research abilities. Candidates will also be encouraged to take a personal stance on curricular and pedagogical perspectives in relation to citizenship education.

Exclusion: Note: This course was formerly numbered as CTL1799H Citizenship education, pedagogy, and school communities. Students who have successfully completed that course are prohibited from taking CTL1325H.
M. Evans

CTL1330H    Education and Peacebuilding in Conflict Zones: International Comparative Perspectives[36L]

This course examines education’s role in exacerbating, mitigating, or transforming direct and indirect (systemic) violence, and in building sustainable democratic justice and peace, in different kinds of conflict zones around the world (such as divided and post-colonial societies, post-war reconstruction, refugee education, and societies suffering escalated gang criminality). We address conflict, justice, relational and peace-building learning opportunities and dilemmas embedded in various curricula and local/international initiatives. Themes include: education in 'emergency' and 'fragile state' contexts; securitization and colonization vs. humanization and restorative/transformative justice in education; history education for violence or peace; education for human rights and social cohesion; inter-group contact and integrated schooling; conflict resolution capability development; and teacher development for democratic peacebuilding. Participants will gain competence and confidence in conflict (transformation) analysis and in applying contrasting theories to contrasting examples of practice.

Exclusion: Note: This course was formerly CTL1799H Education and Peacebuilding in Conflict Zones: International Comparative Perspectives. Students who have taken that course are prohibited from taking CTL1330H.
K. Bickmore

CTL1402H    Adaptive Instruction in Inclusive Classrooms

In today's heterogeneous classrooms, teachers diversify their techniques of teaching, the content of lessons and their systems for evaluating student progress. The greater pupil diversity, the more teachers must adapt instruction. In this course, we will examine adaptive instruction at a macro(teaching methods) and micro-level (student-teacher interaction). Questions to be examined: What are the teacher's responsibilities for adapting instruction? What is an adapted or modified program? Is differential instruction of students discriminatory or essential? How might modified outcomes be evaluated and reported.

Staff

CTL1405H    The Origins of Modern Schooling I: Problems in Education Before the Industrial Revolution

This course presents an overview of education and schooling before the massive intervention of the modern state. It is concerned with those forms of educational communication that formed the background for contemporary educational systems.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken HSJ1400 are prohibited from taking this course.
Staff

CTL1406H    The Origins of Modern Schooling: Issues in the Development of the North American Educational System

Why is the North American school system as it is?  What were the options for change and what are the options for change? Drawing chiefly on North American scholarly literature, this course explores the origins of the state mandated educational systems in the context of traditional patterns of socialization and formal schooling, and changing social, political, and economic conditions.

Exclusion: Students who have previously completed HSJ1401 are prohibited from taking this course.
H.M. Troper

CTL1407H    Rural Education and Social Reform in Canadian History, 1860-1960

This course is directed at those students interested in exploring the deep connections between education and social change in Canadian history. Before 1941, the majority of Canadian families lived outside of cities. This course will examine institutional structures, popular responses, and community involvement, and the ways that these factors interacted as state-run compulsory schooling was slowly accepted. It invites students to explore the vital, but relatively unknown, relationship that existed between education, social protest, and the search for reform in rural Canada in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings in this course will allow students to explore the ways that various people, kinds of people, and organizations, both rural and urban – First Peoples; recent British, African, and eastern European immigrants; educational bureaucrats and revolutionaries; social reformers; settled farm families and itinerant miners – used various kinds of education to encourage, resist and direct social reform in rural Canada.

Exclusion: Students who have completed HSJ1404 are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 36
R. Sandwell

CTL1408H    History of Education and Society: Selected Topics

This course is primarily designed for those with little or no background in historical research. It examines a variety of ways in which cinema is relevant to the study of education and contemporary society. Students will be introduced to the interpretive questions of evaluation, representation, and understanding.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken HSJ1405H are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
H.M. Troper & D. Levine

CTL1423H    Families, Schooling and Canadian History, 1840-1970

This course is directed at those students who want a deeper historical understanding of the changing relationship between one of Canada’s oldest institutions - the family - and the growth of the modern world in general, and the educational state in particular. Although Canadians usually associate the family with the personal and private aspects of their lives, the institution of the family has also been at the centre of Canada’s economic, political and cultural structures for hundreds of years. This course will examine the changing and varied relations among many different kinds of parents, children, and the larger social formations within which they lived, with particular emphasis on the dynamic, often vexed, relationship between schooling  and family life in the wider contexts of Canadian history.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken HSJ1423H are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
R. Sandwell

CTL1424H    Religion, Ideology, and Social Movement in the History of North American Education

This course provides an examination of how faith groups, often at odds with one another or the state, have shaped and continue to shape the Canadian school system, its organization, curriculum, and culture.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken HSJ1424H are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
H.M. Troper

CTL1426H    The History of Gender and Education in Canada

This course explores the changing dimensions of gender relations in Canada from the late 18th to the 20th century. It will examine selected social, cultural, economic, and political developments, shifting meanings of femininity and masculinity in these developments, and their effect on formal and informal forms of education.

Exclusion: Students who previously took HSJ1426H are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
C. Morgan

CTL1427H    History and Commemoration: Canada and Beyond, 1800s - 1990s

This course will examine historical literature that looks at the different ways in which historical commemorations and historical memory have been forged, the hegemonic meanings of the past created by elites, and the contestation of those meanings by those often formally excluded from these processes: women, members of ethnic and racialized groups, and the working classes. We will look at areas such as state commemorations and the creation of 'tradition', the development of museums, historical tourism, and the designation of monuments and battlefields as sites of national memory. The course will conclude with an exploration of current debates over the place of 'history' in the schools and universities.

Exclusion: Students who previously took HSJ1427 are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
C. Morgan

CTL1428H    Immigration and the Development of Canadian Education

This course explores how immigration and immigration policy have shaped and continue to shape the Canadian social, economic, political, and linguistic reality with special reference to education.  As schools are a primary place of encounter between immigrants and the Canadian receiving society, the class will examine the often-differing agenda of immigrants and educators hoping to meet the needs of immigrants and their children.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken HSJ1428 are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
H.M. Troper

CTL1429H    Ethnicity and the Development of Canadian Education

This course explores issues of ethnic and racial identity as factors influencing Canadian civic culture and the educational system in particular.  Special attention will be paid to the changing nature of ethnicity in Canada and the social, linguistic, economic and political challenges ethnic and racial identity represent to keepers of the Canadian gate and educators in particular.

Exclusion: Students who have taken HSJ1429 are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
H. Troper

CTL1430H    Gendered Colonialisms, Imperialisms and Nationalisms in History

This course explores the ways in which gender relations have been an integral part of colonial and imperial expansion and national identities, from the mid-18th to the mid-20th centuries. We examine both how gender relations helped structure these historical developments and how gender relations were subject to change in various colonial contexts (including 'settler societies' such as Canada). The course readings explore the uneven and historically contingent ways in which processes of colonial and national expansion created new forms of gender asymmetry in both colony and metropole.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken HSJ1430H are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
C. Morgan

CTL1448H    Popular Culture and the Social History of Education: II

This course examines a range of themes in the history of education and popular culture, drawn primarily from nineteenth and twentieth-century Canadian history. Topics that will be covered include the impact of popular forms of amusement and education: theatre, tourism, public parades and festivals, and commercial exhibitions and museums. We also will explore the relationship of various levels of the state and of capitalism to popular culture and the relation of "high" culture to mass culture.  This course will pay attention to the influences of gender, race and ethnicity, class, and sexuality in shaping and, at times, challenging, particular forms of popular culture.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken TPS1448H /HSJ1448H are prohibited from taking this course.
Staff

CTL1454H    The Battle Over History Education in Canada

Canadians, like other peoples around the world, have witnessed a breakdown in consensus about what history should be taught in schools, and a heightened awareness of the political nature of deciding whose history is, or should be, taught. Debates about what to teach, and how, are appearing as strands within larger discussions about the social and political meaning and purposes of history, and 'historical consciousness' is emerging in a wide range of cultural activities, from visiting museums to watching the History Channel. Adults and children alike seem to be seeking answers to questions of identity, meaning, community and nation in their study of the past. Students in this course will explore through readings and seminar discussions some of the complex meanings that our society gives to historical knowledge, with particular emphasis on the current debates about history teaching in Canadian schools, and the political and ethical issues involved. This course was previously listed under TPS1461 - "Special Topics in History: History Wars: Issues in Canadian History Education".

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken TPS1461H/HSJ1454H are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
R. Sandwell

CTL1460H     History and Educational Research [RM]

A seminar course required of all M.Ed. students in History of Education, normally taken at or near the beginning of each student's program. The course will both explore selected topics in educational history with special reference to historical research methods in use in the history of education and assist students in undertaking their major research paper.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken HSJ1460 are prohibited from taking this course.
Enrolment Limits: 25
Staff

CTL1602H    Introduction to Computers in Education

An overview of the uses of computers in education and consideration of critical issues of those uses; recommended as a first course in this area. Current practice and research in the use of computers to guide instruction are examined. Includes aspects of computer-aided learning: computers in the schools, computer-managed instruction, computer assisted instruction, internet resources, computer mediated communication, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence applications. Specific topics change each year. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken early in the student's program.

J. Hewitt, E. Woodruff

CTL1603H    Introduction to Knowledge Building

This course examines the role that knowledge building can play in school and work settings. We will review the distinction between knowledge building and learning, analyze recent knowledge building literature, and discuss socio-cultural, logistical and design considerations when constructing an online Knowledge Building community. Students will visit and study existing Knowledge Building communities as one of the course assignments.

J. Hewitt

CTL1606H    Computers in the Curriculum

This course deals with the use of computers in schools as tools for students in curricula other than computer studies. The role that technology can play in school restructuring is examined. Also included is a discussion of issues related to teacher training and classroom implementation, and the ways in which technology applications can influence the curriculum content and process. The major emphasis is on determining the specific educational needs (of students, teachers, etc.) that computers can meet.

D. McDougall

CTL1608H    Constructive Learning and Design of Online Environments

This course will examine the theory and research that underlies constructivist learning and its historical and philosophical roots. The educational applications that have developed out of these ideas, like problem based learning, collaborative learning and knowledge building will be explored in regards to how such concepts can inform and enhance the design of online environments and methods of teaching. We will look at different learning environments, both research projects and applications current in the field that instantiate various elements of these ideas.

C. Brett

CTL1609H    Educational Applications of Computer-Mediated Communication

A survey of the use of computers for human communication for educational purposes. Applications and issues of teaching and learning in the online environment, related to all levels of education, are examined. The course is conducted via OISE's computer conferencing system.

C. Brett

CTL1797H    Practicum in Curriculum: Master's Level

Supervised experience in an area of fieldwork, under the direction of faculty and field personnel.

Staff

CTL1798H    Individual Reading and Research in Curriculum: Master's Level

Specialized, individual study, under the direction of a member of the teaching staff, focusing upon topics of particular interest to the student. Although credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic. A student wishing to enrol in CTL1798 is required to complete, in typewritten form, an Individual Reading and Research Course form, including an appropriate bibliography, describing the rationale and plan of study for the course. This course proposal must be signed by the student's faculty advisor and the instructor with whom the course will be taken, and then submitted for approval to the department's academic programs standing committee.

Staff

CTL1801H    Action Research and Professional Practice [RM]

An examination of the different forms of research that makes central the practitioner's agenda about his/her practices. Alternatives include action science, action research, and participatory research. Emphasis will be placed upon history, ideology, and methods associated with each alternative. Conceptual analysis will be integrated with collaborative research in a field setting.

K. Broad, Staff

CTL1808H    Curriculum Innovation in Teacher Education

This course addresses the content, structure and strategies of recent innovations in preservice teacher education programs. Specific innovations in instruction, field-based activities and school-university relationships are critically examined in relation to changing and sometimes competing conceptions of teaching, learning to teach, and teacher education programs.

K. Broad, Staff

CTL1809H    Narrative and Story in Research and Professional Practice [RM]

The course examines narrative and storytelling approaches to the study of educational experience in research and professional practice. Narrative is explored as a fundamental form of experience and as a collection of methods used for the study of experience and the representation of meanings. Course participants will engage in narrative self-study research, collaborative research with colleagues, and in the review of narrative theses and literature.The course examines narrative and storytelling approaches to the study of educational experience in research and professional practice. Narrative is explored as a fundamental form of experience and as a collection of methods used for the study of experience and the representation of meanings. Course participants will engage in narrative self-study research, collaborative research with colleagues, and in the review of narrative theses and literature.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor
NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL4801 are prohibited from taking this course.
M. Beattie

CTL1810H    Qualitative Research in Curriculum and Teaching [RM]

Critical examination of current qualitative paradigms of research on teaching. The course requires fieldwork research, which serves as the basis for seminar discussions. Students will have the opportunity to develop and present research ideas.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL4802 are prohibited from taking this course
Staff

CTL1811H    Writing Research - Research Writing: Moving from Idea to Reality

This course focuses on supporting graduate students at both the Master's and Doctoral levels who are preparing research proposals, theses, dissertations, and for the comprehensive exam. The course aims to advance the research, writing, and exam preparations for its members and at the same time create an academic community. It examines students' ''works-in-progress'' with the goal of improving and advancing their research. Course topics will include: defining the research question; framing the study; choosing an appropriate research methodology; gathering the data; analyzing the data; and writing the thesis. Through examination of various studies, students will deepen their understanding of the process of conducting research. One emphasis of the course will be research on teaching and teacher education. Each week, students will spend part of the class working in small groups with others who are at the same stage of the doctoral/master's journey. The course will include: feedback on their work, time to discuss aspects of the research process, and an opportunity to present their work in a friendly, supportive environment.

C. Kosnik

CTL1812H    Professional Ethics of Teaching and Schooling

Current educational literature reflects increasing attention to the practical and philosophical significance of ethical decision-making as a central aspect of the professionalism and accountability of teachers in their role as moral agents. This course will examine, through in part the use of case studies, some of the ethical complexities, dilemmas, and controversial issues that arise within the overall context of the school. It will raise questions about ethical concerns that occur as a result of teachers' daily work with students, colleagues, administrators, and parents. The course will consider the nature of professional ethics in education and associated concepts of the moral climate of schools. It will explore theoretical and empirical knowledge in the field of applied educational ethics and the moral/ethical dimensions of teaching and schooling.

E. Campbell

CTL1816H    Minority Education and Inclusion: Policies in Practice

Intended for doctoral graduate students, the objective of the seminar is to do a critical examination of existing official discourses on minority education. The notion of minority students' inclusion is firmly inscribed in the official discourse in North America and in many countries around the world. From a critical theory standpoint, the course will emphasize the analysis of inclusion and other key concepts in the discourse on minority education with reference to society's power structure, as well as social justice and equity issues. This critical examination will bring students to consider how the inclusion of students from diverse racial, ethnic, and linguistic backgrounds is claimed to be accomplished in schools. To attain the objective of the course, official discourses will be examined through existing educational policies and reforms, teachers' training and teachers' daily work.

D. Gerin-Lajoie

CTL1817H    Current Issues in Teacher Education

This course examines various issues of teacher education, including the longstanding criticisms (e.g. program is disjointed) while others are more recent concerns (e.g. defining a knowledge base for teachers). Specific topics will be examined in light of the current context of education with an effort to understand the complexity of becoming a teacher. This course will systematically examine the current research on teacher education. We will consider teacher education both within Canada and internationally. We will systematically work through various topics by reading widely, discussing issues, and trying to determine ways to reform and renew teacher education.

C. Kosnik

CTL1818H    Arts in Education: Concepts, Contexts, and Frameworks

In this class students will survey a range of issues related to the arts in education, including philosophical and theoretical issues, justifications and approaches to the arts in schools, the role of the arts in communities, as well as contemporary media and popular culture. The course will have a broad and interdisciplinary focus and will introduce students to relevant frameworks for conceptualizing a wide range of artistic practices in various educational contexts both within and beyond schools. From a consideration of various rationales for the inclusion of the arts in general education to the educational experiences of artists themselves, the course will seek to bridge the distance between contemporary arts and cultural theory and the integration of the arts in education through curriculum implementation and research.

R. Gaztambide-Fernandez

CTL1819H    Multicultural Literature in the Schools: Critical Perspectives and Practices

In this course, we examine multiple and multicultural books. We examine the multicultural literature (what we read) as well as critically analyzing (how we read) these texts. Critical (indications of class, race and gender relations); multicultural (acknowledges the diversity in cultural experiences) analysis and social action/justice (what and how we act on these analyses) will guide our work together. The new knowledge constructed will inform how we create and develop critical perspectives and practices with students in the schools.

M. Kooy

CTL1822H    Urban School Research: Youth, Pedagogy, and the Arts

This course will examine conceptual, theoretical, and methodological considerations of urban school research. The arts generally- and theatre/drama in particular- will be used as a conceptual and methodological lens that informs questions of curriculum, subjectivity, space, diversity, policy, and youth culture in the study of urban schools. Studies of children/youth and youth culture and conceptions of arts/theatre practices and pedagogies in schools will be examined. Discussions of research problems in school-based research, and methodological and design choices in the development of school-based research projects will be a particular focus. Two of the primary goals of the course are: to expand students' qualitative research interpretation skills by examining the work of other school-based researchers and to help students formulate and articulate their research designs and methods for their own projects.

K. Gallagher

CTL1825H    The Teacher as a Contemplative Practitioner

This course examines the role contemplation can play in teaching. Specifically, the concept of contemplation is explored in relation to reflection, personal narrative, and personal mythology. Students will also examine the thought and biographies of various contemplatives (e.g., Emerson, Huxley, Merton, and Steiner). The course provides opportunities to explore various modes of contemplation. Finally, contemplation will be linked with teaching and how it can allow teaching to become a more fully conscious act.

J. Miller

CTL1841H    Research Seminar in Science, Mathematics and Technology Education [RM]

A critical examination of current theoretical perspectives and research methods in science, mathematics and technology education. The course is designed for those contemplating a thesis in this area. Participants will have the opportunity to present seminars on their research interests.

J. Wallace

CTL1842H    Mixed Methods Research in Education: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Inquiries [RM]

Mixed methods research is drawing increasing attention from educational researchers who seek richer data and stronger evidence for knowledge claims than does any single method used alone. This course is aimed to provide both theoretical and practical foundations for mixing different research methods. In this course, students will discuss various conceptualizations and frameworks of the mixed method research including various designs employing both quantitative and qualitative inquiries, sampling strategies, analysis, synthesis, and representation of findings. The students will participate in both collective and independent mixed-method research projects to develop competencies in mixed research methods.

Staff

CTL1844H    Seminar in Evaluation Problems [RM]

A seminar dealing with theories and practical constraints in the implementation of evaluation strategies in field settings.

Prerequisite: CTL1843 (previously CTL2803) or equivalent.
Exclusion: Students who have previously taken CTL2810 are prohibited from taking this course.
NOTE: Practicum CTL2997 and Seminar CTL1844 may not both be taken for credit in fulfilling the requirements of the eight half-courses in the Ed.D. program in Evaluation.
Staff

CTL1846H    Assessment for Teaching and Learning

Assessment is an integral part of the instructional and learning process. We are also aware that assessment is increasingly used as a means to drive educational reforms and evaluate the quality of education by holding educators accountable for students' learning outcomes. This test-driven educational reform effort has caused a great deal of controversy in modern society across continents. This course is intended for those interested in developing critical assessment literacy. The course readings and activities will focus on both theoretical underpinnings and issues associated with educational assessment practices in a large context and on the practical demands and challenges of various assessment activities in and outside of classroom. Throughout the course, we will learn about alternative assessment approaches that can serve teaching and learning. Students are encouraged to bring their own subject domains (e.g., math, science, language arts, or second language education) to classroom discussions and course projects.

Through this course, students will be able to:

- critically evaluate various assessment initiatives that impacted educational practice in instructional planning, theories of cognition and learning, program evaluation, and policy;
- have a better understanding of uses of assessment for different purposes and contexts;
- select and discuss alternative assessment approaches for teachers in light of current curricular expectations;
- have systematic knowledge about core concepts (e.g., validity, reliability, washback, norm- vs. criterion-referenced testing) underlying educational assessment;
- develop knowledge and skills for improving classroom assessment;
- discuss equity and fairness issues, especially, for underrepresented groups of students.

Staff

CTL1847H    Data Analysis and Integration in Mixed Methods Research

The course is designed to develop and extend the data analytic skills that students began to acquire in other research methods courses and to learn how to synthesize and communicate research findings to a wide range of audiences. The course is applied rather than statistical in the sense that students will learn basic principles and techniques through the instructor's modeling in class and then apply these new techniques to real-life problems using publicly available educational data or their own data. Students will participate in lab sessions in which they will learn computer skills (e.g., NVivo, SPSS, EXCEL, R) necessary for data analysis. The course is designed to serve doctoral students who have taken introductory research methods courses. Students who completed data collection or currently collect data for their theses are welcome to the course. Students pursuing the MA degree need to contact the instructor to receive permission to take the course. My instructional goal is to ensure that students completing the course successfully should be able to: Identify and carry out the appropriate analytic technique for organizing the given data to answer the research question; develop a critical understanding of the assumptions and limitations associated with specific data analytic techniques; feel competent in analyzing most types of educational data; understand the standards of educational research and apply such an understanding to real data analysis and synthesis; Develop the abilities to evaluate the quality of inferences and interpretations from data analyses as a way of building validity claims; Interpret research findings substantively and communicate them to not only academics but also practitioners.

E. Jang

CTL1861H    Critical Ethnography [RM]

An ethnography - of a community, classroom, event, program - seeks to describe the set of understandings and specific knowledge shared among participants that guide their behaviour in that specific context. The value of ethnography as a research method lies in its holistic view of the particular culture, cultural situation or cultural event under study. Critical ethnography is fundamentally concerned with questions of education and inequality. It seeks not only to describe conditions of inequality, but also aims towards creating change in the conditions it describes. In this course we will inquire into the concerns of critical ethnography and learn about conducting and writing critical ethnography by reading and discussing studies that explore the relationship between education and ethnicity, gender, class, race and minority languages.

T. Goldstein

CTL1864H    Methodologies for Comparing Educational Systems [RM]

This course is designed for prospective or practising researchers who wish to use comparative data in their work. Problems in both the acquisition and the use of such data will be considered. Topics will range from the practical problems of gathering data in a foreign country to the analytic tools available for analysing large volumes of data from many countries. Particular attention will be paid to (a) the special analytical problems faced when using comparative data, and (b) the use of comparative data to test propositions and to develop theory in education.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL6801 are prohibited from taking this course
Staff

CTL1899H    CSTD Doctoral Proseminar in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development

The proseminar half-course will be organized into three-hour sessions. These sessions will often involve two parts, which may be organized in any order from week to week. First, some classes will feature a member of the CSTD faculty who will be asked to introduce her or his research to the students and to speak to the question of how her or his work is situated within curriculum studies. Invited faculty will be able to choose one or two readings for that week, in order to give students an introduction to their work prior to the class. Second, each class session will focus on a topic of interest to doctoral students related to academic work in general and doctoral work in particular. The course will introduce students to the details of being a PhD student in CSTD and will provide a forum for exchanging resources and ideas among students. In tandem, the proseminar will provide students with an introduction to academic life in general, including issues such as conferences, publications, teaching experience, academic job markets, etc.

Enrolment Limits: 25
T. Goldstein, R. Gaztambide-Fernandez, staff

CTL1923H    Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing in Education

Leading edge computer technologies that support mobile and ubiquitous knowledge construction will be studied. Implications for mind, education and technology will be examined in addition to the practical applications in schools and other educational settings. 

E. Woodruff and Staff

CTL1997H    Practicum in Curriculum: Doctoral Level

Supervised experience in an area of fieldwork, under the direction of faculty and field personnel.

Staff

CTL1998H    Individual Reading and Research in Curriculum: Doctoral Level

Course description same as CTL1798.

Staff

Language and Literacies Education Program Courses
CTL3000H    Foundations of Bilingual and Multicultural Education

Foundation course for the Language and Literacies Education Program, also open to students from other programs. The course is offered for students particularly concerned with issues of second language instruction, education for minority populations, and pluralism in education, defined in terms of language, culture (including religion), or ethno-racial origin. The emphasis is on study of major foundational writings that have shaped current thinking about these topics and on deriving implications for reflective teaching practice. Registration preference given to LLE students.

E. Piccardo, Staff

CTL3001H    Research Colloquium in Language and Literacies Education

This course focuses on the range of research under way or recently done by professors in or affiliated with the LLE program as well as some recent graduates or visiting scholars.  Topics, research projects, and presenters vary each year. Participants analyze examples of diverse research methods and topics, critique theses previously completed in the program, and undertake a systematic synthesis of prior research related to their prospective thesis on language and/or literacies learning, teaching, curriculum, or policy. The course is required of students in the MA and PhD and may also be taken by students in the MEd. This colloquium provides opportunities to become familiar with ongoing research, research methodologies, and curriculum activities in second-language learning and teaching. 

Staff

CTL3002H    Second Language Teaching Methodologies

This course offers a historical survey of second language teaching methodologies and provides students with theoretical knowledge of innovative current practices, including the movement to a post-method era, new ways of teaching traditional second language skills, and other key issues current in the field. All learner groups are considered in minority and majority settings in Canada and internationally, though English and French are emphasized. 

J. Bale, E. Piccardo, Staff

CTL3003H    Planning and Organizing the Second Language Curriculum

This course deals with current theory and practice in the development of the second language curriculum -- the planning, needs analysis, objectives, content, structure, and evaluation of second language programs for preschoolers to adults. The course is not an introduction to language teaching methods, but rather assumes that participants have taken such a course previously and/or have significant language teaching experience, which they now wish to consolidate -- by studying fundamental issues, current theory and research, recent publications and curriculum initiatives -- to develop their professional knowledge and capacities in this area.

E. Piccardo, Staff

CTL3005H    Current Issues in Language Education

This course will consider current topics relevant to the teaching of second and foreign languages. Specific topics will vary depending on the students' interests, but will normally include curriculum planning and syllabus design, classroom-oriented research, the teaching of reading, writing, and oral communication skills, error analysis, pedagogic grammar, and testing.

Staff

CTL3007H    Discourse Analysis/Analyse du discours

This seminar focuses on discourse and discourse analysis, and their application to the field of second language education. We will review various trends in discourse analysis, such as pragmatics, ethnomethodology, conversational analysis, interactional analysis, critical discourse analysis. We will consider language and discourse from the perspective of political economy and the construction of identities. Attention will also be paid to gender, gender performance and sexuality as identity constructs, as these are interrelated with language use and language acquisition.

Ce cours a pour but d'explorer une conception élargie du langage et de la communication basée sur le discours et l'analyse du discours. Les interactions humaines et sociales se construisent en grande partie au moyen du discours, à travers sa production, sa circulation, sa diffusion, sa légitimation, sa valorisation, sa consignation, sa mise en archives. Deux modes principaux permettent sa production : la parole et l'écrit. La parole inclut divers types d'activités, telles l'expression verbale, la conversation, l'interaction verbale, tandis que l'écrit suppose la production de textes de divers genres. Dans les sciences humaines et sociales, le discours constitue à la fois un mode d'accès à la connaissance et un contenu à étudier. En guise d'illustration, nous examinerons diverses applications de l'analyse de discours, en particulier lorsqu'il s'agit de comprendre la production discursive dans l'exercice d'activités de travail ou dans la construction de l'identité collective en contexte pluraliste.

J. Kerekes, K. Rehner, N. Labrie, Staff

CTL3008H    Critical Pedagogy, Language and Cultural Diversity

Linguistic and cultural diversity have always characterized human societies and have usually played a central role in mediating power relations between dominant and subordinate groups. In recent years, theorists working within the framework of Critical Pedagogy have begun to describe how societal power relations are manifested in schools both through interpersonal interactions and the hidden curriculum. In particular, theory has focused on how language use and language learning interact with dimensions such as class, race, ethnicity, and gender in mediating power relations within the educational system. The course will focus on this body of theory and research and explore its applications to current educational issues related to minority students in both Canadian and international contexts.

C. Connelly, Staff

CTL3010H    Language Learning

This course examines theory and research in second language (L2) acquisition, including cognitive, linguistic, social, biological and affective variables that account for relative success in L2 learning. The role of instruction in L2 learning is also discussed.

Staff

CTL3011H    Cognitive Sociolinguistic and Sociopolitical Orientations in Bilingual Education Research/Bilinguisme et éducation

This course examines bilingual education in its many forms. Particular emphasis will be placed on research questions and findings related to bilingual education in Canada - for English Canadians, French Canadians, immigrant populations, and Native peoples. Issues such as the effects of bilingualism on cognitive functioning, psycholinguistic abilities, and personality will also be explored.

Ce cours a pour but de familiariser les étudiants avec les théories sur le bilinguisme et avec les méthodes de recherche qui ont été développées pour en traiter, de façon à pouvoir prendre en compte ces connaissances dans la recherche, l'enseignement ou le développement de matériel pédagogique, que ce soit en milieu bilingue ou plurilingue, ou en rapport avec l'enseignement des langues. Il porte plus particulièrement sur l'individu faisant l'acquisition ou ayant recours à deux ou plusieurs langues. Il aborde également la question du bilinguisme sur le plan des interactions langagières au sein de communautés linguistiques, comme la famille, la ville, ou le monde du travail.

C. Connelly, N. Labrie, Staff

CTL3013H    Language Assessment/Évaluation de la compétence langagière

This course provides an overview of current practices and problematic issues in language assessment. Topics include approaches commonly taken to developing and using language assessment instruments and procedures, their evaluation, and their applications in specific educational contexts.

Ce cours fournit une introduction à cinq domaines de l'évaluation langagière des langues premières et secondes : la compréhension auditive, la compréhension de la lecture, l'interaction orale, l'expression écrite et la compétence langagière en général. À l'intérieur de chacun de ces domaines, les principaux instruments de mesure, l'usage approprié de ces instruments, et les questions clés sont étudiées. L'évaluation langagière en milieu minoritaire est un thème qui sera examiné plus particulièrement.

E. Piccardo, Staff

CTL3015H    Language and Literacies Education in Multilingual Contexts

A seminar to examine research on literacy education in second, foreign, or minority languages in subject or medium of instruction programs. Psychological and social perspectives are explored in relation to commonalities among and differences between second-language teaching in various kinds of world contexts.

Staff

CTL3018H    Language Planning and Policy/Politique et aménagement linguistique

The study of language politics, language planning and policy-making focuses on how social groups, governments, and other bodies, are involved in language issues, such as language teaching. There are few countries in the world today where language does not give rise to political debates. The state is frequently involved in the way decisions are taken about the languages to be used and promoted in various domains of public life (e.g. education, justice, the media) and even about what ''counts'' as a language. This course aims at providing some understanding of works conducted in this field, the way in which they are developing and the problems they face. There will be an emphasis on practical examples of language planning and policy issues drawn from Canada and other countries, and there will be scope for students to nominate examples, topics or case studies for class consideration. The course is suitable for students interested in the wider policy contexts in Canada and overseas of language education and language issues.

Ce cours a pour objectif de mieux comprendre de quelle façon les interventions humaines sont réalisées sur les dynamiques linguistiques. Nous examinerons en particulier sur quelles bases idéologiques et politiques on en vient à élaborer des politiques linguistiques, quelles en sont les composantes et les principales étapes, et de quelle façon les politiques linguistiques se répercutent dans les pratiques langagières des acteurs sociaux. Idéalement, la politique linguistique devrait permettre à l'école une meilleure prise en compte du contexte qui lui est propre, de façon à harmoniser les rapports entre, d'une part, les langues de l'école, à savoir la langue d'enseignement et les langues secondes ou étrangères à enseigner (ou en d'autres termes la langue en tant que médium d'instruction et en tant que matière enseignée), et d'autre part, la réalité linguistique des élèves, incluant en premier lieu leur langue première pouvant correspondre aussi bien à la langue dominante, à une langue minoritaire, à une langue d'origine ou à une langue autochtone, et, en second lieu, leurs pratiques langagières axées autour du bilinguisme, de la dominance linguistique, de l'alternance et du mixage de codes.  La version française de ce cours satisfait aux exigences de cours de CSTD.

J. Bale, C. Connelly, N. Labrie, Staff

CTL3019H    Research Themes in Canadian French as a Second Language Education [RM]

The last forty years have seen extensive research in FSL education in Canada, largely as a result of the advent of immersion programs. The course will attempt a state-of-the-art assessment of research issues spanning aspects of program design, evaluation, and implementation of all forms of FSL education with particular attention being given to research methods (core, extended, immersion, and adult FSL).

Staff

CTL3020H    Writing in a Second Language

This course focuses on second-language writing, with special attention to relations between research, theory, and practice. Topics include text, psychological and social models of second-language writing instruction and learning, ways of responding to student writing, and techniques for evaluating writing.

Staff

CTL3024H    Language Teacher Education

In this course the many dimensions of second and foreign language teacher education will be explored. The course will focus on four main areas including 1) the foundations of second language teacher education, 2) initial teacher preparation, 3) in-service education and on-going professional development as well as 4) activities and procedures for second language teacher education. Consideration will be given to the specific needs of different types of second language teachers working in either traditional or non-traditional learning environments with learners of different ages. The implications of responding to these diverse needs for second language teacher education will also be explored.

A. Gagné, Staff

CTL3025H    Educational Sociolinguistics

This course addresses the influences of community, home, school, and cultural heritage on (second) language acquisition and language use. Social and educational implications of language variation are addressed, particularly as they relate to language policy and social and linguistic change. Factors such as gender, ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic background are studied as they relate to language use and perception. The current status of different language minority groups is considered, and related cultural and pedagogical issues are raised. Students will acquire an understanding of basic concepts, findings, issues, and research methods in sociolinguistics as they relate to second and foreign language learning, teaching, and use. They will develop a sociolinguistic perspective for the teaching and learning of second and foreign languages and obtain experience in the use of sociolinguistic techniques for the description of language in society as it pertains to second language learning, teaching, and use.

J. Kerekes, K. Rehner, Staff

CTL3026H    Pragmatics in Language Education

This course examines theories, research methods, and substantive findings about second language speakers' and learners' pragmatic style and development. Themes to be explored include the relationship between pragmatic and grammatical development, the role of different learning environments (such as study abroad, EFL vs. ESL), options and effects of instruction, individual differences, institutional discourse, cross-cultural politeness studies, electronic communication, and the interrelation of social context, identity, and L2 pragmatic learning. Through the class, students will understand basic concepts, findings, issues, and research methods in interlanguage and cross-cultural pragmatics; develop perspectives on the teaching and learning of second and foreign languages as pertains to the acquisition of pragmatic competence; and investigate in detail a topic related to the field of interlanguage pragmatics.

Staff

CTL3027H    Curriculum Development for Effective Teaching /Planification de la programmation pour un enseignement efficace

This course defines and illustrates methods for completing important curriculum development tasks such as (a) identifying appropriate course and unit objectives; (b) developing useful growth schemes; (c) developing effective teaching techniques; and (d) constructing practical assessment strategies. Particular attention will be given to problem-solving skills.

Ce cours présente des modèles qui permettent la mise en oeuvre des principales composantes de la programmation comme: a) l'identification des résultats généraux et spécifiques d'un cours ou d'un module; b) la planification de projets à long terme; c) l'élaboration d'outils d'intervention par rapport à differentes stratégies. La résolution de problèmes constituera un élément important des composantes étudiées.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken CTL1002H are prohibited from taking this course.
C. Connelly

CTL3028H    Literacy in Elementary Education

An analysis of the components of literacy programs in the early years. The course will focus on reading and writing elementary education, and will use a wide range of methods and materials of instruction.  Topics include: child- and teacher-centred philosophies, content area literacy, use of digital technology, and assessing growth in reading and writing.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken CTL1003H are prohibited from taking this course
C. Kosnik, Staff

CTL3029H    Children's Literature as a Foundation of Literate Behavior across the Curriculum

An examination of the nature and function of the study of literature. Children's Literature as a Foundation of Literate and culture in elementary schools. This course is designed for experienced teachers who will develop programs, select texts, explore interpretations, and consider implications and applications for schools. 

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken CTL1008H are prohibited from taking this course.
S. Stagg-Peterson, Staff

CTL3030H    Theory and Practice in Elementary Literacy Instruction

This course examines a number of theoretical perspectives on literacy exploring their implications for work with Theory and Practice in Elementary literacy, learning and instruction.  Topics such as literacy across the curriculum, reading comprehension, beginning writing instruction, use of media and technology in writing, and sociocultural influences on literacy learning, will be explored in terms of various theoretical approaches.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken CTL1009H are prohibited from taking this course.
S. Stagg-Peterson

CTL3031H    Children's Literature within a Multicultural Context

This course explores ways to bring children, cultural diversity and literature together in an interactive manner. Stories - whether traditional folktales or contemporary multicultural works - not only help define a child's identity and understanding of self, but also allow others to look into, appreciate, and embrace another culture. Class discussions revolve around an annotated bibliography of articles and books concerned with multicultural children's literature prepared specifically for the course and designed primarily for teachers in mainstream as well as ESL (English as a Second Language) and heritage language classes. The practical aim is for teachers to learn how to take advantage of the cultural diversity and interests that children of varied backgrounds bring to the classroom and to explore themes in folklore in order to open up the world of literature to all their students. The focus is to develop strategies for engaging students in classrooms in meaningful dialogue about diversity using the medium of personal interaction with the multicultural text. Throughout the course, we focus on how to encourage students to share their own cultural stories and ''border cross'' from one world to another. Particular emphasis is placed on the relevance of multicultural children's literature to minority students' self-esteem and literacy formation and to the school's relationship to minority and majority communities in addition to its relevance in confronting issues of human rights and social justice. 

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken CTL1010H are prohibited from taking this course.
G. Feuerverger

CTL3032H    Teaching Writing in the Classroom

This course addresses theories of writing instruction and assessment that influence current classroom practice. Connections between theory and practice will be explored in terms of what it means to be a writer and a teacher of writing. Issues such as the teaching of writing conventions, writing assessment, sociocultural influences on students' writing, and the teacher's role in guiding student writing will be examined.

Exclusion: Students who have previously taken CTL1039H are prohibited from taking this course.
S. Stagg-Peterson

CTL3033H    Literacy Research Methodologies

An exploration of the relationships between theory, research findings, course members' teaching experiences. Course members contribute their teaching experience as a context in which the group discusses ideas drawn as far as possible from original sources read and reported on. The topic, language and learning, cuts across various areas commonly taught in the school curriculum and embraces original work in a number of disciplines (e.g., philosophy, linguistics, psychology, sociology, literary criticism).

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Exclusion: Students who have previously taken CTL1805H are prohibited from taking this course.
S. Stagg-Peterson, Staff

CTL3034H    New Literacies: Making Multiple Meanings

"New Literacies: Making Multiple Meanings” is a graduate seminar for masters and doctoral students interested in exploring issues and research literature in the field of literacy. This course takes up the notion that literacy is not singular, but multiple and ideological: diverse social practices that are embedded in local contexts. The course is designed as a collaborative inquiry into uses and associations that “literacy” has in particular educational projects and contexts. Using a seminar format, we will look at theoretical and empirical literature as well as examples from practice to explore the social functions of literacy in work, home, and school settings, with an eye toward how these conversations and ideas can be useful for researching, theorizing, and teaching in our own areas of interest. We examine new and historical developments in New Literacy Studies, multiliteracies, multimodality, critical literacy, as well as practitioner and activist traditions, and other work that considers literacy in relation to critical, social, political, technological, and educational factors.

Note: CTL3034H New Literacies: Making Multiple Meanings, is cross-listed between LLE and CSTD and therefore also counts towards CSTD program requirements.

R. Simon

CTL3035H    Critical Literacy in Action

This course focuses on critical literacy and the theories that underpin it. Throughout the course participants are asked to explore issues raised by critical literacy in relation to their own circumstances, particularly as these pertain to educational issues within society. This course challenges participants to develop critical questions with application to personal/professional contexts. Video clips of interviews with renowned scholars in literacy studies form the basis of this interactive course. Major questions discussed throughout the course are: What is literacy? What is critical literacy? What is the history of critical literacy? - What is so critical about critical literacy? What are the theoretical underpinnings of critical literacy? How do critical literacies converge and diverge with multiliteracies? What does critical literacy look like in practice? Graduate students will be asked to generate additional critical questions that contribute to individual or collective critical inquiry projects such as a critical literature review, a thesis research project or a curriculum analysis that investigates burning questions about critical literacies.

Exclusion: CTL5010H: Special Topics in Curriculum Studies Teacher Development: Masters level: Critical Literacy in Action
K. Cooper

CTL3036H    Expressive Writing: Practice and Pedagogy

This course focuses on the pragmatics of expressive writing in a range of pedagogical settings. Students will experience the ways in which a range of styles and modes of expressive writing operate in various prose forms including personal narratives, arguments, evaluations, interviews, and reports. Students will consider the implications of this expressivist pedagogy for educational practice from elementary to post-secondary learning. Students will work both independently and collaboratively. Assessment will be portfolio-based. 

G. Allen

CTL3037H    Biography in Educational Contexts[36L]

This course, focusing on (auto)biography, provides graduate students the opportunity to critically analyze biographical contexts of influential educational researchers and scholars such as Henry Giroux, Maxine Greene, and William Pinar, amongst others. Using relevant theoretical frameworks, course participants will engage with the biographies of numerous scholars and will critically discuss the important contributions they have made to the educational field. Students will also have the opportunity to explore and reflect on their own lived experiences and circumstances, particularly in relation to educational issues within society. Video clips of interviews with renowned scholars form the basis of this interactive course.

K. Cooper

CTL3100H    Communication and Second Language Learning in the Workplace[36L]

A huge proportion of workers in Canada utilize at least one language which is not their mother tongue in order to carry out their work. In this course, we will investigate a wide variety of questions and topics related to second language speakers and learners in the workplace.  What is workplace communication?  Who does it?  Why?  What impact do factors have on the conversations that occur in the workplace, including:
- second language ability
- sociolinguistic competence
- intercultural communication
- one’s institutional role (e.g., employee, employer, supervisor, entry-level worker)
- type of workplace (e.g., medical, legal, university, warehouse, construction, etc.
- types of speech events that occur (e.g., meetings, interviews, email memos, internet chatrooms, lectures, workplace ESL classes, etc.)

We will use sociolinguistic tools to understand workplace settings and to investigate what makes for successful multicultural/intercultural workplace interactions. We will analyze authentic examples of written and spoken language in a variety of workplace settings. 

J. Kerekes

CTL3101H    Language Awareness for Language Educators[36L]

This courses explores the nature of language: its rule-governed structure, its variety and its universal characteristics, the way it is acquired by native speakers and additional language learners, its role in society, its role in creating, sustaining, and enhancing power, and its role in informal and institutional education. The aim of the course is to consider (i) language awareness and use in first, second, and foreign language education; (ii) the special need for language awareness in L2 contexts; and (iii) the role of language awareness in teacher development and program administration.  Students will relate course concepts to their own language learning and teaching experiences, and will carry out observational/empirical tasks to apply their learning to the real world.

J. Kerekes

CTL3410H    Schooling in the Movies: Education as Reflected in Hollywood Films

The course will be built around a series of six two week class units. In the first class of each unit students will view a film after which, with the film still fresh in mind, they will have a first discussion of the film and issues it raises. For the next class students will watch a second film on the same topic from a short list supplied, read contemporary reviews for both films, read assigned monographs or articles related to the historical period or subject matter of the films and prepare a short critique based on the films and readings. The second class in each unit will then review the critiques and discuss the films in light of insight afforded by historians or other scholars. Students will also prepare a course paper.

Exclusion: Students who previously completed HSJ1410H are prohibited from taking this course.
Staff

CTL3411H    Cinema and Historical Literacy

This course considers how viewers “read” historical cinema.  Its focus is on the divergent demands of the production of historical films and the ways in which those demands distort (or just change) historical events in order to produce a consumer product.  Each class has an introduction by the professor, viewing the film, and a discussion period.  Students write weekly reports and a term paper.

D. Levine

CTL3412H    Shakespeare and Cultural Literacy

William Shakespeare is the most famous person in the English-language tradition. This course has three main themes: “Historical Shakespeare”, “Re-Created Shakespeare” and  “Shakespeare and Popular Culture”.  Its primary concern is not literary but, rather, the social and historical evolution of Shakespeare’s iconic status.

D. Levine

CTL3413H    Reading Cinema and Cultural Identity

This course is concerned with the ways in which historical films treat the subject of identity.  In this regard, it has four sub-sections: power/gender, class struggle, inter- and intra-cultural connections, and appearances and reality.  Each class has an introduction by the professor, viewing the film, and a discussion period. Students write weekly reports and a term paper. 

D. Levine

CTL3414H    Historical Literacy and Popular Literacy

This course is a survey of the struggle between literacy-as-social-control and literacy-as-enlightenment.  Using  a variety of texts, this theme is followed from the ancient world through to the onset of modern, compulsory schooling.   Each class has an introduction by the professor, viewing the film, and a discussion period.  Students write weekly reports and a term paper. 

D. Levine

CTL3415H    Educational Thought and Historical Literature

This course has two organizing themes: first, representative educational thinkers writings on literacy and schooling (e.g., Plato, Augustine, Erasmus, Luther, Locke, Rousseau, and Malthus); and, second, secondary scholarly readings chosen to enable the students to consider these thinkers’ ideas in their historical context. Each class has an introduction by the professor, viewing the film, and a discussion period.  Students write weekly reports and a term paper. 

D. Levine

CTL3797H    Practicum in Language and Literacies Education: Master's Level

An individualized course linking research and theory in Language and Literacies Education (LLE) with practical fieldwork supervised by a professor. Credit is not given for the fieldwork per se, but rather for the academic work related to it. Academic assignments related to the field work are established collaboratively between the student and professor supervising the course, and evaluated accordingly, in a manner similar to an individual reading and research course (e.g., CTL 3998H). A student wishing to propose a Practicum course must prepare a rationale, syllabus, and bibliography for the course, and obtain the written approval of a supervising professor and of the graduate coordinator in LLE one month prior to the start of the academic term in which the course is to begin.

Staff

CTL3798H    Individual Reading and Research in Language and Literacies Education: Master's Level

Specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing on topics of particular interest to the student. While course credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic. A student wishing to propose an Individual Reading and Research course must prepare a rationale, syllabus, and bibliography for the course, and obtain the written approval of a supervising professor and of the graduate coordinator in LLE one month prior to the start of the academic term in which the course is to begin.

Staff

CTL3805H    Multilingualism and Plurilingualism

This course will examine several forms of linguistic diversity at the individual and community level as well as their impact on language and identity construction. Through the class, students will discuss and understand the emerging notion of plurilingualism as distinct from multilingualism and analyze it from three different scientific points of view: cognitive, sociological/sociocultural and pedagogical. The course will adopt a global perspective in investigating language diversity and its implications in different geographical areas and historical times. The course is at doctoral level but it is open to Master’s students (with permission of the instructor).

Exclusion: CTL3799H Multilingualism and plurilingualism
E. Piccardo

CTL3806H    Sociocultural Theory and Second Language Learning

This course will examine aspects of second language learning (SLL) from the perspective of a sociocultural theory of mind. Key concepts from sociocultural theory, for example zone of proximal development (ZPD), scaffolding, private speech, and mediation will be considered as they relate to SLL. Relevant writings of Vygotsky, Leont'ev, Cole, Donato, Lantolf, van Lier, Wertsch and others will be read in depth.

Staff

CTL3807H    Second Language Education Research Methods [RM]

For thesis students (M.A., Ph.D., or Ed.D) preparing to do empirical research on second language learning, instruction, and/or curriculum, this course reviews and provides experience with relevant techniques for data collection (e.g. focus groups, interviewing, verbal reports, observation, discourse analysis, questionnaires, tests); data analyses (e.g., coding, profiling, summarizing, reliability and verification checks, validation), and addressing ethical issues in research with humans.

Staff

CTL3808H    The Role of Instruction in Second Language Learning

This course examines theory and research on the role of instruction in second language acquisition. The central issues to be addressed are the extent to which different types of instructional input and corrective feedback contribute to second language acquisition (SLA). The extent to which different language features and proficiency levels interact with instructional input is also examined alongside other learner and teacher variables.

Staff

CTL3810H    Second Language Classroom Research Methods [RM]

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundation in the breadth of possibilities for researching the second language classroom. The course is structured to capture this breadth methodologically (primarily quantitative and qualitative social science approaches, but also research informed by humanities approaches); theoretically (cognitivist, socio-cultural, and critical approaches); contextually in terms of program models (both across bilingual, foreign, heritage, Indigenous, and multilingual mainstream contexts, but also in terms of K-12 and adult settings); and in terms of domain (e.g., research with varying foci on language itself, the teacher, learners, curriculum, policy, home-school connections, etc.). As much as possible, the course pairs “how-to” readings with exemplars of second language classroom research. The course also includes structured activities to support students in gaining direct experience with typical methods for doing research in and about language classrooms. Based on the interests of students enrolled in the course, we can agree to adapt the syllabus at the beginning of the semester to narrow or shift our focus. By the end of this course, participants are expected to: 1) Articulate the relationship between theoretical perspective, research design, and methods in the study of second language classrooms; 2) Use course and other readings to critique an exemplar of second language classroom research; 3) Formulate a research(-able) question of interest to the participant; 4) Use small-scale data collection techniques and reflect on their experience with them; 5) Use course and other readings to develop a research proposal.

Exclusion: CTL3800H
J. Bale

CTL3899H    Proseminar in Language Literacies Education[36L]

The Proseminar half-course is usually offered Wednesday evenings during the Winter Session, and is organized into three-hour sessions. These sessions focuses on the range of research under way or recently done by professors in or affiliated with LLE program as well as some recent graduates or visiting scholars. Topics, research projects, and presenters vary each year. Participants analyze examples of diverse research methods and topics, critique theses previously completed in the program, and undertake a systematic synthesis of prior research related to their prospective thesis on language and/or literacies learning, teaching, curriculum, or policy. The course is required of students in the MA and PhD.

Staff

CTL3997H    Practicum in Language and Literacies Education: Doctoral Level

An individualized course linking research and theory in Language and Literacies Education (LLE) with practical fieldwork supervised by a professor. Credit is not given for the fieldwork per se, but rather for the academic work related to it. Academic assignments related to the field work are established collaboratively between the student and professor supervising the course, and evaluated accordingly, in a manner similar to an individual reading and research course (e.g., CTL 3998H). A student wishing to propose a Practicum course must prepare a rationale, syllabus, and bibliography for the course, and obtain the written approval of a supervising professor and of the graduate coordinator in LLE one month prior to the start of the academic term in which the course is to begin.

Staff

CTL3998H    Individual Reading and Research in Language and Literacies Education: Doctoral Level

Specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing on topics of particular interest to the student. While course credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic. A student wishing to propose an Individual Reading and Research course must prepare a rationale, syllabus, and bibliography for the course, and obtain the written approval of a supervising professor and of the graduate coordinator in LLE one month prior to the start of the academic term in which the course is to begin.

Staff

CTL5010H    Special Topics in Curriculum: Master's Level

A course designed to permit the study of a specific area of curriculum or instruction not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. (This course does not fulfil the purpose of CTL1798-Individual Reading and Research in Curriculum: Master's Level, which in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning is normally conducted on a tutorial basis.)

Staff

CTL5300H    Special Topics in Language and Literacies Education Program: Master's Level

A course designed to permit the study (in a formal class setting) of specific areas of language and literacies education not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. (This course does not fulfil the purpose of CTL3798-Individual Reading and Research in Language and Literacies Education: Master's Level, which is normally conducted on a tutorial basis.)

Staff

CTL5700H    Special Topics in Teaching

A course designed to permit the study of a specific area of teaching not already covered in the courses listed for the current year.

Prerequisite: Enrolment limited to students in the Teaching program.
Staff

CTL6010H    Special Topics in Curriculum: Doctoral Level

A course designed to permit the study (in a formal class setting) of a specific area of curriculum or instruction not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. (This course does not fulfil the purpose of CTL1998-Individual Reading and Research in Curriculum: Doctoral Level, which in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning is normally conducted on a tutorial basis.)

Staff

CTL6300H    Special Topics in Language and Literacies Education: Doctoral Level

A course designed to permit the study (in a formal class setting) of specific areas of second language education not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. (This course does not fulfil the purpose of CTL3998-Individual Reading and Research in Language and Literacies Education: Doctoral Level, which is normally conducted on a tutorial basis.)

Staff

CRE1001H    Éducation, francophonies et diversité

This seminar proposes to study, from a range of perspectives, Francophone minorities within local, national and international spaces. It will discuss the processes of minoritization and exclusion existing within and towards francophone minorities. The study of issues structuring the French-speaking space is an opportunity to bring to light the transformative processes that have taken shape, have been contested, and which have succeeded each other as debates have evolved over time and to identify the actors involved, their motivations, the context of their actions and the categories of classification that emerged from these debates. Similarly, the study of linguistic minorities has led to the exploration of a large number of theoretical concepts and advances stemming from various disciplines and traditions. This seminar will thus serve as a forum for examining how to achieve a better understanding of the issues facing linguistic minorities and to formulate new research questions by using various theoretical orientations and putting them to work.

This is the core required course for all students enrolled in the Collaborative Specialization: Education, Francophonies and Diversity.

Staff

JHC1251H    Reading in a Second Language

This course will provide the student with a better understanding of current issues in reading in a second language (L2) by focusing on theoretical and practical questions. Theories and research on reading in a first language (L1) will be examined for their relevance to reading comprehension in L2. A cognitive developmental approach will be used to examine the applicability of research findings on topics such as: background knowledge; text structure; comprehension strategies; study strategies; cultural differences; and reading in various content areas. Students will be encouraged to develop their own research questions and to apply these to practical L2 reading contexts.

E. Geva, B. Chen-Bumgardner

JTE1952H    Language, Culture, and Education/Langue, culture et éducation

The anthropological perspective of the ethnography of communication will be adopted to study the relationship between language use, social relations, culture and learning in and out of schools. The course will deal with the nature and origin of cultural differences in language use and patterns and social interactional styles; with the consequences of those differences for school performance; and with the usefulness of the ethnography of communication as both a research and a pedagogical tool in the development of curricula and teaching practices that account for such differences. The ethnography of communication will also be interpreted in the light of political economic perspectives on the issue of sociolinguistic diversity and educational success.

Le lien entre l'usage linguistique, les rapports sociaux, la culture et l'éducation, à l'intérieur comme à l'extérieur des écoles, sera examiné selon l'approche anthropologique de l'ethnographie de la communication. La première partie du cours sera consacrée à l'étude des caractéristiques et des origines des différences culturelles dans la façon de s'exprimer à l'oral et à l'écrit, et de même que le comportement adopté dans l'interaction sociale. La deuxième partie sera consacrée au lien entre ces différences culturelles, le rendement académique, le développement linguistique des élèves en situation multilingue/multiculturelle et les notions de pouvoir et d'inégalité. Finalement, nous examinerons l'utilité de l'approche ethnographique comme méthodologie de recherche et comme outil ou méthode pédagogique. Le cadre théorique et méthodologique établi dans ce cours servira à l'examen des problèmes de l'éducation francophone.

M. Heller

JTE2912H    Teachers' Work: Classrooms, Careers, Cultures and Change

Although there is a long tradition of efforts to describe the characteristics of teachers as an occupational group, or examine the practice of teaching, it is only in the past few decades that scholars have explored the experiences and cultures of teachers in depth, drawing upon a greater range of theories, methods and ideologies. Some researchers have sought to probe the thinking processes of teachers, particularly the way in which knowledge is expressed in action: others have explored the pivotal role of teachers in school effectiveness and innovation; others have developed models of teachers as workers under threat; still others have analysed the extent to which gender structures teachers' lives and careers. This course provides an introduction to such topics, at the same time encouraging students who are or have been teachers to reflect upon their own experience and the context in which it occurs. We look at teachers as individuals using skills and creating identities; as actors and negotiators in classrooms; as colleagues in a workplace; as members of an occupation. Throughout, we shall remain alert to the social policy contexts and constraints within which teachers must operate as strategists and decision-makers.

Staff

JTE3803H    Ethnographic Research in the Language Disciplines

Ethnographic research covers all those methods of inquiry typically used in qualitative research, such as interviews, content analysis, focus groups, discourse analysis, triangulation, questionnaires, observation studies, and case studies. It also covers the broad approaches to research that use these methods: classical ethnography, ethnography of communication, and critical ethnography. Participants will be free to concentrate on methods that interest them and to mix methods according to need.

M. Heller, T. Goldstein

APD3202H    A Foundation of Program Evaluation in Social Sciences [RM]

This doctoral-level course serves as an introduction to program evaluation used in education, psychology, and social sciences. Program evaluation aims to systematically investigate the process, effectiveness, and outcomes of programs. Its primary goal is to inform decision-making processes based on answers to why it works or doesn't work and improve the quality of the program. In this course, students will learn the craft of program evaluation at various stages, including: critically appraising evaluation research; assessing program needs, developing a logic model, evaluating the process and outcomes of the program, evaluating efficiency, dealing with ethical issues, warranting evaluation claims, and communicating with stakeholders. This course will focus on both theoretical and practical issues in designing, implementing, and appraising formative and summative evaluations of various educational and invention programs. In this course, we will consider the effects of various social, cultural, and political contextual factors underlying the program.

E. Jang

APD3228H    Mixed Methods Research Designs in Social Sciences [RM]

Mixed methods research is increasingly being used as an alternative to the traditional mono-method ways of conceiving and implementing inquiries in education and social sciences. In conceptualizing mixed methods studies, various paradigmatic assumptions are still being debated. However, many researchers have stated that the paradigmatic differences have been overdrawn and that paradigmatic incompatibility makes dialogue among researchers less productive. Researchers further acknowledge that philosophical differences are reconcilable through new guiding paradigms that actively embrace and promote mixing methods. Mixed methods researchers reject traditional dualism and prefer action to philosophizing by privileging inquiry questions over assumptive worlds.  In this course, students will be introduced to various mixed methods design alternatives that allow researchers to link the purpose of the research to methodologies and integrate findings from mixed methods. This course covers various phases of mixed methods research, including theoretical frameworks of mixed methods research designs, strategic mixed methods sampling, data collection methods, integrative data analysis strategies, and a mixed methods research proposal. This is a doctoral level course designed to serve students who plan to conduct independent research. I anticipate that students will have had prior research experience or course work in research methods.

E. Jang

Master of Teaching Courses
CTL7000H    Curriculum and Teaching in Literacy

This course is an introduction to education approaches and the role of the teacher in using research, theory, literature and multi-modal texts to teach and assess literacy and to support students’ literacy across the curriculum in K-10 classrooms.  This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Staff

CTL7001H    Educational Professionalism, Ethics and the Law

This course will enable teacher candidates to analyze the interrelated legal and ethical conditions that shape the classroom context specifically and educational change generally. The Ontario College of Teachers regulations and professional misconduct policies and procedures will be studied. Topics include leadership theories, the legal context of education, parental participation, and the influence of collegial relationships with students, parents, community, government and social business agencies upon the classroom and the school. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Staff

CTL7002H    Curriculum and Teaching in Mathematics

An introduction to education techniques and the role of the teacher in implementing, evaluating and designing mathematics curricula for students in grades K to 10. Additionally, the course explores methods for curriculum planning and development including practical assessment strategies. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Staff

CTL7003H    Curriculum and Teaching in Social Studies and Science

This course examines the conceptual basis underlying teaching methods, problems, and issues related to curricula on social studies and science including practical assessment strategies. This course is normally open only to students in the Master of Teaching program.

Staff

CTL7004H    Practice Teaching (Year 1)

This first year course provides supervised experience in an area of fieldwork, under the direction of faculty and field personnel. Teacher candidates are placed in partnership schools in public and separate school systems and in other settings that use the Ontario curriculum. Teacher Candidates are under the joint supervision of a field teacher on site and an academic staff member at OISE. The teacher candidates will have one placement in each of their divisions. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Staff

CTL7005H    Practice Teaching (Year 2)

In this second year course, teacher candidates are placed in partnership schools in public and separate school systems and in other settings that use the Ontario curriculum. Teacher candidates are under the joint supervision of field teachers on site and an academic staff member at OISE. Teacher candidates may have experience in one or both of their divisions. They may be placed in special education, library or specialist classrooms in their last placement. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Staff

CTL7006H    Educational Research 1

This course is designed to develop students’ identities as teacher-researchers who continuously engage in critical inquiry as a key component of their professional practice.  Students will develop knowledge and understanding of how to access, interpret, synthesize, and evaluate research literature in a chosen field of study, and they will learn what it means to enact research-informed practice in their identities as critical inquiry practitioners. The following themes guide the course in complementary ways: 1) the teacher as a reflective professional oriented towards inquiry into educational theory and practice 2) the teacher as a reflexive agent responsive to the reproduction of social inequities in students’ experience of schooling and learning, 3) the teacher as a critical analyst of educational research and knowledge production, 4) the teacher as a practitioner researcher knowledgeable of conceptual and methodological approaches to the study of teaching and schooling.

Staff

CTL7007H    Authentic Assessment

This course presents an overview of the basic concepts, practices, and current research associated with effective assessment and evaluation in Ontario classrooms. Teacher candidates will develop an understanding of Ontario curriculum and policy documents as relevant to the professional obligations of student assessment and evaluation, grading and reporting. Examination of effective strategies of assessment for, as, and of learning is at the core of this course.  Drawing on current research, attention may be given to topics such as validity and reliability, assessment tool design, success criteria, quality feedback, performance assessment, authentic assessment, portfolios, self-evaluation, data gathering and management, standardized testing in provincial or large-scale assessments, as well as assessment related beliefs, attitudes, and issues of psychological well-being. Related issues of equity and a critical stance are infused and discussed throughout the course.  

This course is normally open only to students in the MT program. Students may not take CTL 1019.

Staff

CTL7008H    Introduction to Special Education and Mental Health

In this course, teacher candidates are introduced to topics/core content related to both Special Education and Mental Health and Well-Being. Teacher candidates will consider Special Education from the perspective of the general classroom teacher. From this perspective, special education is not "special" but is effective teaching that benefits all students in the class. Teacher candidates will consider Mental Health as pertaining to students’ resilience, social/emotional well-being and mental wellness.

This course is designed to promote critical and reflective thinking and learning about topics related to supporting a diverse range of learners, including students identified as requiring special education support.  Specifically, this course will support teacher candidates to: (1) examine their own beliefs and practices related to supporting student learning, (2) understand and utilize a strength-based approach and teaching strategies for differentiation, accommodation, and modification to plan for and assess learning needs, (3) understand the relationship among mental health, well-being and achievement and view student well-being as inclusive of physical, cognitive/mental, social and emotional well-being, (4) identify ways to support students’ mental health and well-being and identify students who require more intensive intervention (4) develop the capacities to work with families and other professionals in support of students, (5) demonstrate the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and confidence necessary to effectively promote success for students with a broad range of experiences, needs and abilities, including students with exceptionalities, (6) develop the knowledge and skills pertaining to First Nation, Métis, and Inuit ways of thinking about the kinds of differences associated with special education needs. This course will pay particular attention to current research in planning for inclusion through Universal Design for Learning (UDL), differentiated instruction (DI), and response to intervention (RTI) and how these can inform teachers' responses to students; various ways of being, learning, and showing understanding in the classroom.

Staff

CTL7009H    Anti-Discriminatory Education

This course inquires into a range of equity issues including: teacher candidates’ (TC) own biases, dispositions, ideas and positionality; relationships between and among students, teachers, community, administrators and families; the ways in which systemic oppressions operate within K-12 schooling in Ontario and beyond; and the interlocking social, economic and political (re)production of inequalities (including but not limited to race, indigeneity, class, gender, sexuality, ability, language, age and religion). The course develops TC capacity to interrogate and challenge multiple forms of discriminatory practices within education, seeking to develop TC’s understandings of theories and practices of pedagogies of liberation within daily life in schools. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Exclusion: Students who have completed this course are prohibited from taking CTL1011H.
Staff

CTL7010H    Issues in Numeracy and Literacy

In this course, Primary/Junior teacher candidates will explore theoretical and current issues in numeracy and literacy spanning kindergarten through grade eight. Integration with other subject areas and course work will be addressed. The experiences in this course are intended to help teacher candidates bridge theory and practice, and articulate personal beliefs and experiences related to literacy and numeracy. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Teacher candidates in the Junior/Intermediate division will explore a variety of both theoretical and current issues related to junior and intermediate schooling. The importance of content area curriculum, including the drama and dance curriculum; integration of curriculum across subject areas, community in classrooms and schools; culturally responsive teaching; and out of school experiences will be addressed. In the literacy portion of this course, there will be an emphasis on critical literacy, drama curriculum and dance curriculum specific and overall expectations. The course is intended to help student teachers understand the complexity of the junior/intermediate panel and particular issues regarding working with adolescents. Student teachers will be encouraged to articulate personal beliefs as they relate to teaching of drama, dance, critical literacy, and mathematics, as well as working with students, and the role of the teacher.

Staff

CTL7011H    Child and Adolescent Development and Learning

This course addresses issues and developmental changes in children and the factors involved in child development. Infancy, the preschool period, early school years, intermediate years, and adolescence are covered. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Staff

CTL7012H    Issues in Secondary Education

There are both professional and academic rationales underpinning this course. Teachers and high schools are governed by a range of shifting and variably interpreted legal, policy and ethical mandates which have been produced in a range of historical, political and institutional contexts. One key aim of this course is to assure that teacher candidates are aware of their professional and legal rights and responsibilities, as defined by national and provincial legislation, local school board policy, and professional advisories. Another aim of the course is to explore ethical nuances and challenges in teaching while aiming to interpret and respond to relevant legislation that helps to define the teacher's professional role. Using academic research literature, policy documents, and case studies, the course blends theory with the consideration of practical in-school situations in order to enable teacher candidates to analyse policy, ethical and legal tensions in teaching. The course thus aims to rigorously explore teachers' professional contexts so as to inform their daily practice through thoughtful ethical reflection in light of legal and policy considerations.

Staff

CTL7013H    Arts in Education

An introduction to research-informed teaching and professional learning in Music Education, Visual Arts Education, and Health and Physical Education for students in grades 4 to 10.  For each of these disciplines, the course explores Ministry curriculum, lesson design and planning, pedagogy, assessment and evaluation, and research in light of contemporary educational theory and practice.  This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching Program.

Staff

CTL7014H    Fundamentals of Teaching and Learning

This course will explore the complexity of schools and place of the school in the community. Practical issues around lesson planning, unit planning, classroom management, and the class as a community are addressed. This course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of students and will introduce student teachers to many of the philosophies, methods, and materials relevant to teaching. It provides opportunities to develop an understanding of the process of becoming a teacher, insight into the role of ethics in research, and to acquire the skills and attitudes to be a thoughtful and reflective practitioner. In these respects, this course enables the student teacher to build a foundation for continuing professional growth as an individual and as a member of the teaching community.  This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Staff

CTL7015H    Educational Research 2

This course is paired with the 2nd year Practicum course (CTL7005H), and serves to connect academic course work, researching and writing the later stages of the Master of Teaching Research Project, and the development of students' professional identities as teachers. This course therefore attends to the intersections of research, theory, and practice. Course goals include deepening understanding of the complexities of teaching and learning, refining a vision of teaching, and preparing students for their professional work as educators and/or further academic study. This course takes up these aims alongside a focus on completion of the Master of Teaching Research Paper. In addition to supporting students' own research, this course develops students' capacity to collaborate with colleagues, as well as make use of research, theory and other bodies of knowledge to inform personalized pedagogical decisions and determine next academic and professional steps. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Staff

CTL7016H    Integrating Technology into the Classroom: Issues and Activities

This course deals with the use of computer technology in schools as tools for students in curricula other than computer studies. The role that technology can play in school restructuring is examined. Also included is a discussion of issues related to responsible use, teacher training, and classroom implementation, and the ways in which technology applications can influence the curriculum content and process. The major emphasis is on determining the specific education need (of students, teacher, curriculum objectives or subject area) that computer technology can meet. This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching program.

Staff

CTL7017H    Curriculum and Teaching in Music, Dance and Drama

An introduction to research-informed teaching and professional learning in Music, Dance and Drama Education for students in grades K to 6.  For each of these disciplines, the course explores Ministry curriculum, lesson design and planning, pedagogy, assessment and evaluation, and research in light of contemporary educational theory and practice.  This course is normally open only to students in the Teaching Program.

C. Brett

CTL7018H    Curriculum and Teaching in Science and Environmental Education

This course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of Science Education and Environmental Education in PJ and JI. This course consists of lectures, discussions, learning activities and workshops designed to emphasize the expectations, pedagogy, methodology and content of Science and Technology, and Environmental Education across the curriculum in the primary, junior and intermediate (PJ, JI) grades, based on the Ministry of Education curriculum found in The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8, Science and Technology (2007), The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 & 10, Science (2008) and Ministry policy, Acting Today, Shaping Tomorrow (2009). As an overview, it will introduce theory and practices from a range of related fields, including Science and Technology Education, Environmental Education (EE), Outdoor Education, and Ecojustice Education, drawing on concepts such as Inquiry-based Learning, Sustainability, Systems-Thinking, Equity, Interdisciplinary Design, and Integration. The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning, effective use of teaching resources, digital technology, assessment/evaluation strategies, and an exploration of related educational research literature.

C. Brett

CTL7019H    Supporting English Language Learners

This course focuses on the inclusion of English Language Learners (ELLs) across the school curriculum. It is intended to support teacher candidates’ development of a pedagogical approach and a repertoire of instructional and assessment strategies to engage ELLs in developing language and content knowledge simultaneously. Using an asset-based perspective to language diversity, the course is structured around the broad domains of (1) theories of language learning and teaching, (2) language awareness, analysis, and assessment, (3) ESL strategies in the content areas, and (4) family, school, community, and policy contexts. Upon successful completion of this course, candidates should be able to identify and use ELLs’ individual strengths and interests to promote their learning and development, to work with families and other professionals to support ELLs, and to understand their roles and responsibilities as teachers with respect to ELLs and their academic, social, and personal success. 

Staff

CTL7020Y    Curriculum and Teaching in English - Intermediate/Senior

This course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching English in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). Written, visual and virtual texts such as literature, media and technology define the content. Topics include teaching textual forms, writing processes, classroom language and media/technology. Teacher candidates will read, write, view, talk and represent their understanding of text to reflect on English/Language Arts practices and theories, as preparation for informed curriculum planning and implementation. The content, methodologies, evaluation and skill requirements in English/Language Arts will be linked to Ontario Ministry of Education guidelines. This course is normally open only to students in the Master of Teaching program.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in English if selected as the first choice teaching subject, or three full-year university courses if selected as the second choice teaching subject.
Staff

CTL7021Y    Curriculum and Teaching in History - Intermediate/Senior

This course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching History in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). A variety of teaching/learning strategies, assessment techniques and approaches to curriculum design will be explored. Adapting the history program to meet the needs of a diverse student body will be highlighted. Course methods include demonstrations, interactive sessions, small group activities and field studies. Assignments will require candidates to develop practical applications and to link theory and practice. This course is normally open only to students in the Master of Teaching program.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in History if selected as the first choice teaching subject, or three full-year university courses if selected as the second choice teaching subject. For further details about prerequisites in History, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7022Y    Curriculum and Teaching in Mathematics - Intermediate/Senior

This course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching Mathematics in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). A variety of teaching/learning strategies, assessment techniques and approaches to curriculum design will be explored. Course methods include discussion of objectives, teaching methods, instructional materials, testing and evaluation, and selected topics from the Ontario Ministry of Education Guidelines. This course is normally open only to students in the Master of Teaching program.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in Mathematics if selected as the first choice teaching subject, or three full-year university courses if selected as the second choice teaching subject. For further details about prerequisites in Mathematics, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7023Y    Curriculum and Teaching in Science: Biology - Intermediate/Senior

This course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching Biology in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts. Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and to creating an inclusive and motivating learning environment. Throughout the program, efforts are made to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools. This course is normally open only to students in the Master of Teaching program.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in Science, with a minimum of four full-year courses in Biology (regardless of whether it is the first or second choice teaching subject). For further details about prerequisites in Science-Biology, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7024Y    Curriculum and Teaching in Science: Chemistry

The I/S Science-Chemistry course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of Intermediate Science (Grades 7 to 10 Science) and Senior Chemistry (Grades 11 and 12 Chemistry).  This course consists of a series of lectures, seminars and laboratory workshops designed to emphasize the research in teaching and learning of chemistry The course expectations, pedagogy, methodology and content of science in the intermediate and senior grades are guided by the Ministry of Education curriculum policy documents: The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 1-8, Science and Technology (2007), The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 & 10, Science (2008) and The Ontario Curriculum Grades 11 & 12 Science(2008).  The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts.  Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and candidates will be encouraged to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in Science, with a minimum of four full-year courses in Chemistry (regardless of whether it is the first of second choice teaching subject). For further details about prerequisites in Science-Chemistry, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7025Y    Curriculum and Teaching in Science: Physics

Designed to prepare teachers of Science in the Intermediate and Senior Divisions (Grades 7-10 Science and Grades 11-12 Physics), this course deals with the Overall and Specific Expectations of the Ontario Science Curriculum. The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts. Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and to creating an inclusive and motivating learning environment. Throughout the program, efforts are made to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in Science, with a minimum of four full-year courses in Physics (regardless of whether it is the first or second choice teaching subject). For further details about prerequisites in Science-Physics, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7026Y    Curriculum and Teaching in Science: General[72L]

This course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of Intermediate and senior Science. It consists of a series of lectures, seminars, and laboratory workshops designed to emphasize the expectations, pedagogy, methodology, and content of science. The course is designed to assist students to explore: the teaching and learning process, the pedagogical considerations in teaching science; and the challenges of teaching science as a curriculum subject in schools with a diverse student population and research in science education. It is also designed to help develop the knowledge and skills of curriculum development within the context of curriculum theory and to support personal reflection within the context of contemporary classrooms or other education settings.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in Science, with a minimum of one full-year course in each area of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics (regardless of whether it is the first or second choice teaching subject). For further details about prerequisites in Science-General, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7027Y    Curriculum and Teaching in Social Science: General (I/S)

This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to teach students Social Science at the Grade 7-10 level in a thoughtful and interactive way. It focuses on Social Science at the Intermediate level. Teacher candidates will explore a variety of teaching techniques, which are useful in teaching and assessing today's students as they experience the current Social Science curriculum.

Teacher candidates will also have an opportunity to engage in inquiry and examine unique ways for presenting Social Science content. Examining classroom practice and methods, curriculum and program materials are an important component of the process. As well, the interdependence of these components, their link with theory and contemporary issues will be considered.

Techniques such as discussion, presentations, inquiry, and active participation that incorporate individual and group learning will be employed. Opportunities for sharing of ideas and experiences from field placements will be provided in the context of the classroom setting.

Two important ideas that will be emphasized throughout the program are: how to make Social Science meaningful for children, and how to promote positive attitudes.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in any of Psychology, Sociology or Anthropology if selected as your first choice teaching subject, or three full-year university courses if selected as your second choice.
Staff

CTL7029Y    Curriculum and Teaching in Music: Instrumental

This course investigates approaches to music learning, teaching, and assessment through instrumental performance, composition, conducting, listening, analysis and creative problem solving. Candidates will develop a repertoire of diverse teaching and assessment strategies appropriate for Ontario students in grades 7-12.  A range of music education philosophic orientations, Ministry of Education policies, music technologies, research-informed pedagogies, and those emerging the field are considered while learning to design of curriculum lessons and units.  Recent research questioning the music education paradigm of the past 25 years is examined.  A practitioner research stance is the basis for all assignments, which curriculum development, and practical learning in Japanese lesson study format as well as philosophic writing.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in Instrumental Music if selected as the first choice teaching subject, or three full-year university courses if selected as the second choice teaching subject. For further details about prerequisites in Instrumental Music, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7030Y    Curriculum and Teaching in Music: Vocal[36L]

This course investigates approaches to music learning, teaching, and assessment through vocal performance, composition, conducting, listening, analysis and creative problem solving. Candidates will develop a repertoire of diverse teaching and assessment strategies appropriate for Ontario students in grades 7-12.  A range of music education philosophic orientations, Ministry of Education policies, music technologies, research-informed pedagogies, and those emerging the field are considered while learning to design of curriculum lessons and units.  Recent research questioning the music education paradigm of the past 25 years is examined.  A practitioner research stance is the basis for all assignments, which curriculum development, and practical learning in Japanese lesson study format as well as philosophic writing. 

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in Vocal Music if selected as the first choice teaching subject, or three full-year university courses if selected as the second choice teaching subject. For further details about prerequisites in Vocal Music, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7031Y    Curriculum and Teaching in Health and Physical Education[72L]

This course examines the underlying principles of teaching Health and Physical Education in the Intermediate/ Senior division for the 21st century learner by drawing on current research, current philosophies and the overarching goals of Health and Physical Education. This course of study prepares future teachers to enable their students to acquire the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to become both physically and health literate in order to lead healthy active lives and promote healthy active living for others. Attention will be paid to the importance of supporting students in making positive personal health choices, enhancing their personal fitness and further developing movement skills, strategies and tactics to promote their participation in a wide variety of physical activities. Effective teaching strategies and practices in Health and Physical Education will be addressed. The importance of quality instruction as it fits into a comprehensive school health model will also be explored.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in Health and Physical Education if selected as the first choice teaching subject, or three full-year university courses if selected as the second choice teaching subject.
Staff

CTL7034Y    Curriculum and Teaching in French as a Second Language[36L]

This course will help teacher candidates develop the skills, knowledge, and professionalism expected of beginning core French teachers at the Intermediate and Senior levels. We will focus on:

  1. methods and techniques to facilitate the teaching/learning of listening, speaking, reading and writing as interrelated processes
  2. integrating grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, culture, language awareness, learning strategies, media, technology, literature, and a variety of assessment strategies into lesson plans and long-term teaching units which reflect current Ministry of Education guidelines;
  3. electronic conferencing to support a collegial learning environment;
  4. the creation of a professional electronic portfolio.

Candidates will be involved in reflective and active learning.  This course is offered in French.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in French AND demonstrated written and oral proficiency (regardless of whether it is the first or second choice teaching subject). For further details about prerequisites in French, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7041Y    Curriculum and Teaching in Religion[36L]

Primarily intended to prepare teachers of Religious Education in Catholic secondary schools, the focus of the course is the discipline of Religious Education rather than religious doctrine.  This course examines contemporary theories and issues of pedagogy, analyzes present guidelines and support materials, and addresses teaching models and assessment practices relevant to the field of Religious Education. It asks students to present research-based findings from explorations of theorists, strategies, and resources in the discipline of Religious Education. In particular, graduates from this program will have a strong sense of how Catholic Social Teachings can animate the Religious Education curriculum.

Prerequisite: Students must have six full-year university courses in Theology or Religious Studies if selected as the first choice teaching subject, or three full-year university courses if selected as the second choice teaching subject.
Staff

CTL7050H    Intermediate Teaching Subject – English (First Language)

This course engages students in the practices, resources and theories of English/Language Arts to prepare them for teaching in the intermediate grades (Grades 7-10). Explorations of written, visual and virtual texts such as literature, media, and technology define the content. Since language is fundamental to thinking and learning, students engage in reading, writing, viewing, talking and representing strategies as the practical grounding for understanding and reflecting on English/Language Arts practices, and for creating sound language curricula. The content, methodologies, evaluation and skill requirements of the course will be linked to Ontario Ministry of Education and Training guidelines.

Prerequisite: Students must have three full-year university courses in English.
Staff

CTL7051H    Intermediate Teaching Subject – French (Second Language)

This course will help teacher candidates develop the skills, knowledge, and professionalism expected of beginning core French teachers at the junior/ intermediate levels. We will focus on:

  1. Methods and techniques to facilitate the teaching/ learning of listening, speaking, reading and writing as interrelated processes.
  2. Integrating grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, culture, language awareness, learning strategies, media, technology, literature, and a variety of assessment strategies into lesson plans and long-term teaching units which reflect current Ministry of Education guidelines.
  3. The creation of a professional portfolio.

Candidates will be involved in reflective and active learning. This course is offered in French.

The course will use Blackboard for communication and on-line learning supports: http://portal.utoronto.ca

Prerequisite: Students must have five full-year university courses in French AND demonstrated written and oral proficiency. For further details about prerequisites in French, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7053H    Intermediate Teaching Subject – Health and Physical Education

This course of study prepares future teachers to design and deliver contemporary

Intermediate level (grades 7-10) Health and Physical Education programs. It is consistent with the national and provincial trend towards de-emphasizing competitive team sports and focuses on wellness and the process of guiding youngsters to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that lead one to become physically active for a lifetime. Participants relate social, cultural, economic and political factors to teaching and student learning and their ability to work collaboratively within the school setting, systems and the community.

One of the aims of the course is to introduce new ways of thinking about Health and Physical Education and its role in schools, thereby supporting beginning teachers as they construct their vision for teaching Health and Physical Education. The importance of quality instruction as it fits into a comprehensive school health model will also be explored.

Prerequisite: Students must have three full-year university courses in Health and Physical Education.
Staff

CTL7054H    Intermediate Teaching Subject – History

The purpose of this course is to introduce teacher candidates to basic knowledge, skills/techniques, attitudes and methodologies applicable in the successful teaching of History. The course will, therefore, deal with both the practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of History in Ontario's schools.

The course is an enabling process to help you develop your own teaching and learning beliefs through experiencing and experimenting with the ways history’s concepts and skills can help students learn. It stresses that reflection and analysis about their own teaching are critical elements in the life-long developmental process of being teacher first, historian second.

History is not a collection of arcane information. People everywhere need to know about the nature of their world and their place in it. History has more to do with asking questions and solving problems than it does with memorization of isolated facts. A primary objective of the course is to equip you with practical, innovative strategies around which to build an effective history program. As well, you will be exposed to a wide variety of learning resources that can be used to enhance classroom learning. In the end you will leave the course well prepared to deliver an exciting and success-based history curriculum to a diversity of learners.

Guiding Focus: To explore the meanings of history and teaching history, and to develop innovative curriculum and pedagogical strategies to meet the needs of a diversity of learners.

Prerequisite: Students must have three full-year university courses in History. For further details about prerequisites in History, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7055H    Intermediate Teaching Subject – Mathematics

This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to teach students mathematics at the Grade 7-10 level in a thoughtful and interactive way. It focuses on mathematics at the Intermediate level. Teacher candidates will explore a variety of teaching techniques, which are useful in teaching and assessing today's students as they experience the current mathematics curriculum.

Teacher candidates will also have an opportunity to engage in inquiry and examine unique ways for presenting mathematics content. Examining classroom practice and methods, curriculum and program materials are an important component of the process. As well, the interdependence of these components, their link with theory and contemporary issues will be considered.

Techniques such as discussion, presentations, inquiry, and active participation that incorporate individual and group learning will be employed. Opportunities for sharing of ideas and experiences from field placements will be provided in the context of the classroom setting.

Two important ideas that will be emphasized throughout the program are: how to make mathematics meaningful for children, and how to promote positive attitudes.

Prerequisite: Students must have three full-year university courses in Mathematics. For further details about prerequisites in Mathematics, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7058H    Intermediate Teaching Subject – Science – General

This course is designed to prepare teachers of science in the intermediate division (Grades 7-10). It explores the teaching of selected units in all four strands from the Ontario Science and Technology Curriculum guideline. Attention is paid to the skills of lesson planning, laboratory techniques, teaching strategies, and assessment and resources, through workshops, lectures and lab activities. 

This course will consider important contexts as they relate to science and technology in education as outlined in:

Prerequisite: Students must have three full-year university courses in Science. For further details about prerequisites in Science, refer to the website for Master of Teaching > Prerequisites (see lower half of MT webpage): http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/mt/Prerequisites.html
Staff

CTL7060H    Intermediate Teaching Subject – Drama

This course of study prepares future teachers to design and deliver contemporary dramatic arts instruction for Intermediate level (grades 7-10) learners.  Teacher candidates will examine both the research on adolescent development and strategies for effective dramatic arts pedagogies. The course will also explore how teachers can promote student engagement and how to foster a positive, supportive classroom culture. Special attention will be given to such topics as role playing, improvisation, techniques for infusing drama in other disciplines, and the special role that the dramatic arts can play in examining issues of equity, inclusivity and diversity.

Prerequisite: Students must have three full-year university courses in Drama and Theatre Studies.

CTL7070H    Issues in Secondary Education 2

As a required course in a professional program, there are both professional and academic rationales underpinning this course. Teachers and high schools are governed by a range of shifting and variably interpreted legal, policy and ethical mandates which have been produced in a range of historical, political and institutional contexts. One key aim of this course is to assure that teacher candidates are aware of their professional and legal rights and responsibilities, as defined by national and provincial legislation, local school board policy, and professional advisories. Another aim of the course is to explore ethical nuances and challenges in teaching while aiming to interpret and respond to relevant legislation that helps to define the teacher's professional role. Using academic research literature, policy documents, and case studies, the course blends theory with the consideration of practical in-school situations in order to enable teacher candidates to analyse policy, ethical and legal tensions in teaching. The course thus aims to rigorously explore teachers' professional contexts so as to inform their daily practice through thoughtful ethical reflection in light of legal and policy considerations.

Staff

CTL7071H    Curriculum and Teaching in Visual Arts and Physical Education

As a part of the Curriculum & Instruction course, this module is designed to introduce you to strategies and approaches for teaching Visual Arts Education and Health & Physical Education (HPE) to Primary and/or Junior learners. This course is designed to help OISE MT students (re)discover the theory and practice of Art Education and HPE, as well as understand and apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for effective teaching and learning that meets the diverse needs of students. Over the course you will become more competent and confident in working with learning tools and resources in each of these areas of the curriculum; developing lesson themes and ideas; and devising questions and learning activities for students. You will become familiar with the Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum policy documents: The Arts (2009), and Health & Physical Education (2010), core concepts and teaching techniques, methods for integrating Art Education and HPE with other disciplines, including social justice, environmental education and indigenous approaches to knowing. Current ways of thinking about and teaching Art Education and HPE may differ significantly from when beginning teachers were students; therefore one of the aims of the course is to introduce new ways of thinking about these disciplines and their role in contemporary approaches to teaching and learning.

Staff

CTL7072H    Curriculum and Teaching in Social Studies and Aboriginal Education

The Curriculum and Instruction in Social Studies and Aboriginal Education course explores the shared histories of Indigenous and settler relationships across Turtle Island and, while recognizing the US/Canadian divisions as colonial constructs, will focus more specifically on the Canadian context.  This course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of Social Studies (Grades 4-6), History and Geography (7-10) within the context of Aboriginal (First Nations, Métis and Inuit) understandings. This course consists of a series of seminars and workshops designed to emphasize the expectations, pedagogy, methodology and content integrating both Social studies and Aboriginal Studies in the junior/intermediate grades.

The course provides opportunities to develop practical understandings relating to instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning, including practical assessment strategies, in a variety of classroom contexts as well as the incorporation of Indigenous and Western knowledges and understandings. It seeks answers to questions of identity, meaning-making, complex issues concerning community and nation, past and present. It looks to bring local histories and traditional ecological knowledges- and to provide a template for understanding the complex interplay relating to constructions of identity (personal, local, and national) and sovereignty.

Staff

CTL7073H    Indigenous Experiences of Racism and Settler Colonialism in Canada: An Introduction

With a focus on teacher preparation, this course seeks to understand the experiences of Indigenous people in Canada with regard to racism and settler colonialism, focusing on implications for classroom-based, programmatic, and pedagogical practice and reform. Because schooling has a historical and contemporary role in facilitating racism and settler colonialism, especially through the creation of residential schools, this course encourages teachers to become familiar with the consequences of this ongoing history, and to learn strategies to rethink relationships between schools and Indigenous learners and communities.

Staff

CTL7074H    Issues in Educational Law, Policy and Ethics

As a required course in a professional program, there are both professional and academic rationales underpinning this course. Teachers and high schools are governed by a range of shifting and variably interpreted legal, policy and ethical mandates which have been produced in a range of historical, political and institutional contexts. One key aim of this course is to assure that teacher candidates are aware of their professional and legal rights and responsibilities, as defined by national and provincial legislation, local school board policy, and professional advisories. Another aim of the course is to explore ethical nuances and challenges in teaching while aiming to interpret and respond to relevant legislation that helps to define the teacher's professional role. Using academic research literature, policy documents, and case studies, the course blends theory with the consideration of practical in-school situations in order to enable teacher candidates to analyse policy, ethical and legal tensions in teaching. The course thus aims to rigorously explore teachers' professional contexts so as to inform their daily practice through thoughtful ethical reflection in light of legal and policy considerations.

Staff

CTL7099Y    Major Research Paper

The Master of Teaching Research Project is designed to provide a deeper exploration of the interrelationships between educational theory, research, and practice. The overarching goal of this project is to engage students in an in-depth analysis of issues related to curriculum, teaching, and learning through systematic research.  The MTRP has value both for students who are intending to pursue a career in classroom teaching, and for students who are planning to pursue doctoral studies.  The Project involves the identification of a research problem, a literature review, data collection, data analysis, the construction of a formal report, which is published in a public online repository, and a formal presentation.  As part of this process, students develop a variety of research-related skills, including the ability to formulate effective research questions, conduct interviews, review the academic and professional literatures, analyze data, and present research findings.

NOTE: Course will be offered effective Summer 2014. Students will normally add CTL7099Y in May at the end of their first year in the Teaching program. This course is not available to students who began in the program prior to 2013-14.
Staff

CTL7100H    Mathematics Concepts for Elementary Teacher Candidates

This course equips students with the math knowledge and skills needed by Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate teachers. A strong foundation in math content knowledge is necessary for teachers to build pedagogical content knowledge capacities. Students will develop an understanding of numeracy concepts in: quantity relationships, operational sense and proportional reasoning. The course will build on problem solving content skills in multiplication, division, order of operations, fractions, decimals, percentages, ratios, integers, exponents, manipulating expressions and solving algebraic equations. Students will be immersed in meta-cognition as math learners and will reflect on their own math strengths, needs and learning styles. The course will offer various math pedagogies, such as math games and hands-on activities suitable for elementary classes. At the beginning of the course, teacher candidates may opt into taking a math proficiency test geared at the grade 8 and 9 level. Students who earn a minimum achievement of 90% on the test will earn an immediate CR grade for CTL 7100H and will be excused from the remainder of the course. This test is most appropriate for teacher candidates who have a major or minor in math for their undergraduate degree.

Staff

CTL7052H    Curriculum and Teaching in Junior/Intermediate Geography

The purpose of this course is to introduce teacher candidates to basic knowledge, skills/techniques, attitudes and methodologies applicable in the successful teaching of geography and social studies at the J/I level. The course will, therefore, deal with both the practical and theoretical issues related to the teaching of geography and environmental education in Ontario's schools.

The course is an enabling process to help you develop your own teaching and learning beliefs through experiencing and experimenting with the ways geography's concepts and skills can help students learn. It stresses that reflection and analysis about their own teaching are critical elements in the life-long developmental process of being teacher first, geographer second.

Geography is not a collection of arcane information. Rather, it is the study of spatial aspects of human existence. People everywhere need to know about the nature of their world and their place in it. Geography has more to do with asking questions and solving problems than it does with memorization of isolated facts.

So what exactly is Geography? It is an integrative discipline that brings together the physical and human dimensions of the world in the study of people, places, and environments. Its subject matter is Earth's surface and the processes that shape it, the relationships between people and environments, and the connections between people and places.

The world facing students on graduating will be more crowded, the physical environment more threatened, and the global economy more competitive and interconnected. Understanding that world, that environment, and that economy will require high levels of competency in Geography, because Geography means a sensitivity to location, to scale, to movement, to patterns, to resources and conflicts, to maps and geographics.


CTL7056H    Music - Instrumental

This course of study prepares future teachers to design and deliver contemporary Intermediate level (grades 7-10) Health and Physical Education programs. It is consistent with the national and provincial trend towards de-emphasizing competitive team sports and focuses on wellness and the process of guiding youngsters to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that lead one to become physically active for a lifetime. Participants relate social, cultural, economic and political factors to teaching and student learning and their ability to work collaboratively within the school setting, systems and the community. One of the aims of the course is to introduce new ways of thinking about Health and Physical Education and its role in schools, thereby supporting beginning teachers as they construct their vision for teaching Health and Physical Education. The importance of quality instruction as it fits into a comprehensive school health model will also be explored.


CTL7057H    Music - Vocal

These courses investigate approaches to music learning, teaching, and assessment through vocal and instrumental performance, conducting, listening, analysis and creative problem solving; and personal experience with music and technology (MIDI) and media arts. Candidates will develop a repertoire of diverse teaching and assessment strategies appropriate for Ontario students in grades 7-10. Current music education philosophies, Ministry of Education and Training policy and best practices from the field will be the basis for the designing of curriculum lessons and units. Assignments involve practical applications of methodology and frequent personal reflections on music teaching.


CTL7059H    Curriculum and Teaching in Junior/ Intermediate - Visual Arts

The focus of the course is on becoming visual arts teachers in the intermediate grades.

The course is structured to intersect theory, practice, and studio work in order to explore

a) contemporary art and elementary education; b) contemporary issues in pedagogy; c) lesson planning at the elementary level d) the above in relation to Ministry guidelines, assessment, and curriculum development.