OISE Graduate Studies in Education Bulletin
2016-2017

Leadership, Higher and Adult Education

Leadership, Higher and Adult Education (LHAE)

       Codes:

Adult Education and Community Development Program - MEd, MA, PhD

Educational Leadership and Policy Program  -  MEd, MA, EdD, PhD

Higher Education Program

For more information on LHAE programs, please also see the School of Graduate Studies Calendar.

Adult Education & Community Development Program

Adult Education & Community Development Program

Course offerings cover a wide range of topics within the program description overall, and course groupings include:

• Aboriginal/Indigenous Education
• Community Development and Social Justice
• Global Education and Change
• Workplace Learning and Change

Admission

Admission to AECD is competitive as we receive many more applications than we are able to accept. Applications are assessed on the basis of five criteria – clarity of writing in the statement of intent; strength of letters of reference; grades; work, community or volunteer experience; and fit with the program offerings.

For comprehensive application details, please see: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/ro/Graduate_Admissions/index.html

For Minimum Admission and Degree Requirements for all degrees in the Adult Education and Community Development program see the SGS Calendar.

Applicants should submit a Statement of Intent indicating which of the four Course Groupings listed below most interests them and naming at least two faculty members whose interests are closest to their own.  The Program values experienced applicants.  The resume submitted must provide clear and complete information about the applicant's work or field experience related to their proposed studies.

Students may include in their program of study, courses offered by other OISE and University of Toronto graduate departments. With the approval of the faculty advisor and the Office of the Registrar and Student Services, Registration Team, students are permitted to take the equivalent of two half-courses at another recognized graduate institution for credit in this Program, but must commence their program of study with OISE courses.

Degrees

Master of Education

Admission to the Master of Education program normally requires mid-B standing in the final year of an appropriate bachelor's degree in a relevant discipline or professional program. Students are also required to have at least a year of relevant work, community or volunteer experience.

The MEd degree can be taken on either a full-time or part-time basis. It serves individuals seeking to develop skills for education, community and organizational development roles in a wide range of settings in public, private and voluntary sectors. The MEd program of study includes 10 half-courses usually at the 1000-level and no thesis.  At least half of the courses must be from the Adult Education and Community Development Program.  Students are required to take one core course consisting of either LHA1100H Introduction to Adult Education or LHA1102H Community Development: Innovative Models. In addition, one research course is recommended. Master of Education students wishing to undertake significant research during their regular 10 course program may choose to take LHA1183H Master's Research Seminar and LHA1191H Research Support Seminar, or LHA1105H and LHA1106H Introduction to Qualitative Research Parts I & II.

Master of Arts

Admission to the Master of Arts program normally requires a mid-B or better in the final year of an appropriate bachelor's degree in a relevant discipline or professional program. At least a year of relevant work, community or volunteer experience is highly desirable.

The MA is a research-based degree program which can be taken on a full- or part-time basis. In addition to eight half-courses, students complete a thesis based on original research. 

Mainly, courses at the 1000 level will be taken. Four must be from the Adult Education and Community Development program. Additional courses may be required of some students.  Students are required to take one core course consisting of either LHA1100H Introduction to Adult Education or LHA1102H Community Development: Innovative Models and LHA1183H Master's Thesis Seminar.  One half-course in research methods is required. A list of appropriate research courses will be maintained in the department. The master’s thesis may lay the groundwork for doctoral research.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission to the PhD program normally requires an MA in Adult Education or a related area, with standing equivalent to B+ or better in master's courses. In special cases, an outstanding student may still be admitted with an MEd and a Qualifying Research Paper in lieu of a thesis.

The PhD degree program is designed to provide opportunities for advanced study in the theoretical foundations of adult education and in the application of such knowledge to practice. AECD offers both a regular full-time and flexible-time PhD program. Flexible-time students are required to register full-time for the first four years of their program, students may request part-time registration beginning their fifth year. The regular PhD program is a full-time program.

Full time PhD students must complete their degree within six years.  Flexible-time PhD students must complete their degree within eight years. Degree requirements for both full-time and flexible-time PhD students are: six half-courses, at least three of which must be from the Adult Education and Community Development Program. One of these courses must be the Doctoral Thesis Seminar LHA3102H, which students will normally take in their first or second year. Students will also normally take at least one specialized research methods course, which may be taken outside the Program with permission of the supervisor. Students with little background in the field of Adult Education and Community Development will be required to do a seventh half-course providing such background. In addition, the degree requirements include a comprehensive paper and a thesis.

NOTE:  Admission to the Flexible-time PhD is specifically for working applicants who are currently involved in activities related to the proposed field of study, have a desire to develop their current career, and have the capacity to secure blocks of time to enable concentrated study.

Further information is available from:
Professor Bonnie Burstow, Program Coordinator (as of July 1, 2016)
Telephone: 416 978-0887
E-mail: bonnie.burstow@utoronto.ca 


Centres

The following research centres are based in the Department:

Through its faculty, the Department is also involved in other research centres at OISE such as:

The Comparative, International and Development Education Centre (CIDEC)

Program Director: Stephen Anderson
Location:  OISE, 252 Bloor Street West, Room 7-107
Telephone:  416-978-0892
Website:  www.oise.utoronto.ca/cidec
E-mail:  cidec.oise@utoronto.ca

The Comparative, International and Development Education Centre (CIDEC) is a research centre that has three mandates:  to promote international, interdisciplinary research at OISE; to incubate new field development projects; and to provide instructional leadership in comparative and international education. 

Academic coordination of the interdepartmental CIDE Collaborative Program is provided by the Comparative, International and Development Education Centre, which is housed on the 7th floor. The centre is staffed by an administrative officer, and boasts a state of the art smart room, research lab and resource centre. CIDEC administers a wide variety of research and development projects. It also provides a gathering place to connect students and faculty with comparative and international education interests throughout OISE via a seminar series, an electronic list serve, electronic newsletters, website and research projects, and a student association.

Centre for Learning, Social Economy and Work (CLSEW)

Program Director: Peter Sawchuk
Location:  OISE, Room 7-188, 252 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON M5S 1V6 
Website:  www.oise.utoronto/clsew
E-mail:  oise.clsew@utoronto.ca

Established at the University of Toronto in 2014, CLSEW merges two research centres - Centre for the Study of Education and Work and the Social Economy Centre.

CLSEW brings together academics, labour educators, and participants in the social economy and broader community: non-profit organizations, co-operatives, social-enterprises, unions and worker-and-community recuperated enterprises. CLSEW's research focuses on marginalized social groups and work and learning in the public and private sectors. CLSEW's research aims to understand and enrich the often under-recognized contributions of work and learning dynamics throughout their full range of variation in Canadian society and internationally. In addition to an active research program, CLSEW offers other resources: a speakers' series, workshops leading to a certificate, and outreach to community organizations.

 

Transformative Learning Centre (TLC)

Centre Director: Angela Miles 
Location:  OISE, 252 Bloor Street West, Room 7-165
Telephone:  416-978-0785
Fax:  416-926-4749
E-mail:  tlcentre.oise@utoronto.ca
Website:  http://tlc.oise.utoronto.ca/

The Transformative Learning Centre (TLC) is a unique interdisciplinary hub for the study and practice of learning and action in a wide range of community and social movement contexts that involves both individual and social transformation. 

 

Interdepartmental Research Areas

The Adult Education and Community Development faculty are also associated with the following Interdepartmental Research Areas:

Aboriginal Education

The Adult Education and Community Development program, along with the departments of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, and Social Justice Education, collaborate in this interdepartmental research area and in the development of Aboriginal Education studies. The Indigenous Education Network (IEN) is the OISE-wide forum for students and faculty to work together on shared research and teaching interests. The IEN and the Aboriginal Student Caucus offices are located in the department of Leadership, Higher and Adult Education.

Participating faculty:
Jean-Paul Restoule, Bonnie Burstow, Angela Miles (LHAE), Suzanne L. Stewart (APHD), Sandra Styres (CTL), Martin Cannon, G. Sefa Dei, N. Wane (SJE).

Further information is available from:
Jean-Paul Restoule
Telephone: 416-978-0806
E-mail: jeanpaul.restoule@utoronto.ca 

Learning and Work

This research area is devoted to pursuing critical investigations of all aspects of learning that may be relevant to work and workplace life across a wide range of sectors and settings:  public, private, business, industry, not-for-profit, and community enterprises. Relevant research is being done by all faculty in this stream, and  through the Centre for Learning, Social Economy & Work (CLSEW). Contact Peter Sawchuk (peter.sawchuk@utoronto.ca) for more information.

Transformative Learning

The Adult Education and Community Development Program supports involvement in this OISE-wide interdepartmental research area. Email tlcentre.oise@utoronto.ca for more information.

Women’s Studies/Feminist Studies

Students and faculty in Adult Education and Community Development, Educational Leadership and Policy, Higher Education, and Counselling Psychology Programs, and the Departments of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, and Social Justice Education participate in this Interdepartmental Research Area. Contact Angela Miles (angela.miles@utoronto.ca) for more information.

 

Course Groupings

The Adult Education and Community Development (AECD) Program offerings include courses in the four broad areas described below. This grouping is a guide for course selection, to demonstrate the range of related learning opportunities available to all students who apply for entry into the AECD program. Students are free to select courses throughout this range of areas, as well as courses in other programs or departments.

Aboriginal/Indigenous Education

The Aboriginal/Indigenous Education area underscores the value and diversities of Indigenous knowledges that demonstrate the conception of educational experience as lifelong holistic processes. Education is understood to encompass a spectrum of experiences from the local cultural/spiritual and geographic to international relationships across the world. Courses in this area place Aboriginal/Indigenous wisdom at the centre of education initiatives by drawing from Aboriginal/Indigenous Elders, traditional teachers, oral traditionalists, artists, craftspeople, and scholars whose bodies of work contribute to Aboriginal knowing and learning. Aboriginal/Indigenous Education takes on de-colonizing methods of teaching, researching and service to the community, while centering on the concept of self-determination in working with Aboriginal communities. The courses attract educators from a variety of backgrounds whose work (teaching, research, service) may benefit or have an impact on the lives of Aboriginal/Indigenous peoples. Courses in this area contribute to the Graduate Collaborative Program in Aboriginal Health.

Community Development and Social Justice

Courses in the Community Development and Social Justice area focus on popular education, collective action, social justice, peace, sustainability and planetary survival. They frame community learning, development and activism as a complex, multifaceted social, economic, political, cultural and spiritual endeavour. These courses bring varied perspectives including feminist, ecological, anti-racist, decolonizing, political economy, indigenous, transformative learning and community organizing (among others) to a rich dialogical learning experience informed by critical analysis and alternative visions. They create an environment where students of diverse backgrounds, experiences and perspectives and varying levels of expertise can challenge and support each other to broaden and deepen their approaches, as they undertake research and practice and contribute to knowledge. Knowledge and learning/teaching outside of the academy are honoured, and emphasis is placed on building strong, mutually beneficial connections with diverse individuals, groups and communities in Canada and internationally. Many courses in this area are also part of Graduate Collaborative Programs in Community Development, Environmental Studies, Comparative, International and Development Education, and Women and Gender Studies. 

Global and Comparative Education

The AECD program has a long and rich history of engagement in international adult education and international participatory action research, and in the comparative study of adult literacy and community development around the world. Courses in the Global and Comparative Education area will be of interest to students from Canada and abroad who wish to understand issues of adult learning, community development, social movement organizing, and participatory approaches to citizenship learning and participation in other countries and cultures and internationally. Courses in this area include applied courses in international program management, participatory citizenships, and on other dimensions of adult, organizational and community learning with a comparative or international focus.

Workplace Learning and Social Change

Courses in the Workplace Learning and Social Change area attract educators and other practitioners and researchers from private, public and not-for-profit sectors including labour unions and cooperatives. They engage students in two broad themes: a transformative analysis of the workplace and an examination of alternative approaches to workplace design.

The first theme situates the workplace within a broader social framework, including the impact of various forms of hierarchies (for example, social class, gender, race and ethnicity) and related social policies upon the organization of work and the distribution of its resources. Some central issues include:  the changing meanings of work; the impact of hierarchical social relations upon such criteria as worker satisfaction, health and safety, creativity and productivity; the effects of globalization upon the workplace; and the impact of work upon the natural environment.

The second theme involves the study of models that seek to reduce workplace inequities. These alternative models attempt to achieve greater equality of power and remuneration; greater inclusivity; broader participation in decision-making; more reflective, responsive and respectful work environments; greater workplace and economic democracy; a better informed workforce; a higher quality of working life; and more sustainable forms of production. This focus subsumes a broad interpretation of the workplace, including the home and community, and non-formal as well as formal workplace arrangements.

Educational Leadership and Policy Program

Educational Leadership and Policy Program

Degrees

The MEd and EdD degree programs are designed to prepare practitioners for leadership careers at various levels.  These degree programs concentrate on those elements of theory and research that are of direct assistance in understanding and resolving problems and issues confronting practicing administrators.

The MA and PhD degree programs are intended particularly for those who are interested in educational leadership and policy as an academic field of study.  Students are typically interested in the ideas in this applied field of study, and their research involves the application of ideas to practice.  The MA appeals to those with an excellent academic background who want to continue to the PhD.  The PhD is especially of interest to those considering a career in the university or in research.

Master of Education

The MEd program in Educational Leadership and Policy is designed primarily for students who are interested in learning the nature and practice of leadership and policy, especially with respect to social diversity and change. The MEd focuses mainly on K-12 school education and related issues. The MEd degree may be pursued either part-time or full-time.

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements in the Minimum Admission and Degree Requirements section, desirable departmental criteria for admission to an MEd degree program are as follows:

  1. an appropriate bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized university (equivalent to at least Mid-B or better in final year), preferably with a concentration and focus in an area relevant to the type of educational administration the applicant wishes to enter;
  2. an interest in the study and practice of educational leadership and policy;
  3. academic qualifications beyond the first degree;
  4. two letters of reference (see Application Procedures section).  Whenever possible, one should be written by an educational administrator for whom the applicant has worked, and the second by an academic referee.

Degree Requirements

There are three options within the MEd program in Educational Leadership and Policy for all students.  New MEd students are placed in Option IV initially.  To change to another Option, students should first meet with their faculty advisor to discuss their academic program.  The suggested timeline for this is after the student has completed three or four courses.  A change of option request requires the recommendation of the faculty advisor and the signature of the Program Coordinator. 

The three program options are:

Option II which is comprised of:

  1. three required courses
    LHA1003H - Conducting Research in Educational Leadership and Policy [RM]
    LHA1040H - Educational Leadership and Policy I: Introduction to Educational Administration: Policy, Leadership and Change
    LHA1041H - Educational Leadership and Policy II: Social and Policy Contexts of Schooling;
    NOTE:  LHA1040H and LHA1041H should preferably be the first courses taken in a student’s program of study.  LHA1003H should be taken toward the end of the program of study.  LHA1004H is strongly recommended.
  2. five other half-courses, of which at least two must be in Educational Leadership and Policy. Students may choose to focus on one of the four research areas: Policy, Leadership, Change, and Social Diversity;
  3. a Major Research Paper (MRP) LHA2001Y Major Research Paper, to be carried out under the guidance of a faculty member.

OR 

Option III which is comprised of:

  1. three required courses
    LHA1003H - Conducting Research in Educational Leadership and Policy  [RM]
    LHA1040H - Educational Leadership and Policy I: Introduction to Educational Administration: Policy, Leadership and Change
    LHA1041H - Educational Leadership and Policy II: Social and Policy Contexts of Schooling
    NOTE:  LHA1040H and LHA1041H should preferably be the first courses taken in a student’s program of study.  LHA1003H should be taken toward the end of the program of study.  LHA1004H is strongly recommended.
  2. three other half-courses, of which at least one must be in Educational Leadership and Policy.  Students may choose to focus on one of the four research areas: Policy, Leadership, Change, and Social Diversity;
  3. a comprehensive thesis to be carried out under the guidance of a faculty member.

OR

Option IV which is comprised of:

  1. four required courses
    LHA1004H ‑ Introduction to Research Literacy in Educational Leadership and Policy  [RM]
    LHA1040H -  Educational Leadership and Policy I: Introduction to Educational Administration: Policy, Leadership and Change
    LHA1041H - Educational Leadership and Policy II: Social and Policy Contexts of Schooling
    LHA1050H - Themes and Issues in Policy, Leadership, Change, and Diversity;
    NOTE:  LHA1004H, LHA1040H and LHA1041H should preferably be the first courses taken in the student’s program of study.  LHA1050H should normally be taken as the final course in the student’s program.
  2. six other half-courses, of which at least two must be in Educational Leadership and Policy.  Students may choose to focus on one of the four research areas: Policy, Leadership, Change, and Social Diversity. 

    Option IV (Hybrid Delivery part-time only)
    The Hybrid/Online MEd Cohort enables students to complete all four required core courses plus two electives online. For the remaining four elective courses, students may select online or face-to-face courses. This cohort enables participation for students who cannot travel to campus at OISE regularly.

Students contemplating applying to an EdD or a PhD program are strongly recommended to take option II or III.  Both doctoral programs require a QRP (Qualifying Research Paper).  Students should plan their MEd courses particularly carefully with their faculty advisor.  MRPs may meet the QRP requirements.

The MEd degree may be pursued either part-time or full-time.  The Department strongly recommends completion of theses and MRPs within eighteen months of finishing course requirements.  Once students have completed the defined Program Length or have begun their last required course (whichever comes first) they must continue to register until theses or MRPs are approved. 

Any course offered by the Department, by the Institute, or by another graduate faculty in the University of Toronto may be selected as an elective.  Individual Reading courses are electives and should not be taken at the beginning of a student’s program.  Students selecting such courses should consult their faculty advisor.

Off-Campus Courses (MEd and Certificate students)
Some sections of existing courses are offered off-campus in order to make them available to people in localities far from Toronto.

Further information is available from:
Professor Carol Campbell, Program Coordinator
Telephone:  416-978-1266
E-mail: carol.campbell@utoronto.ca

Master of Arts

The MA program in Educational Leadership and Policy fosters the study of problems in the administration and leadership of educational programs. It will best serve students who have a commitment to scholarship and research as a means of deepening their understanding of administrative action in schools or in other educational and service institutions. While experience in teaching and administration is not an essential prerequisite for admission, such experience provides a desirable background. The MA is available through both full-time and part-time studies.

 

Admission Requirements

Admission to the MA degree program requires an appropriate bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized university, in a relevant discipline or professional program of study, completed with the equivalent of B+ standing in the final year (see the Minimum Admission and Degree Requirements section).

Degree Requirements

The MA degree program of study consists of eight half-courses and a thesis.  At least half of the required courses for the MA degree program must be completed in the Educational Leadership and Policy Program.  The remaining courses may be selected from those offered in the Department, in other departments of OISE, or in other graduate departments of the University of Toronto.  Students are required to take the following courses:  LHA1003H, LHA1004H and LHA1040H. LHA1041H is strongly recommended.  Normally the courses chosen for the MA program of study will be at the 1000-level.  Individual Reading courses are electives and should not be taken at the beginning of a student’s program.

Additional courses may be required of some applicants.  The MA is available through both full-time and part-time studies.

Doctor of Education

The EdD program in Educational Leadership and Policy is intended to develop highly competent leaders for administrative positions in school systems, colleges, universities, and other educational institutions. The program is specifically designed to help working professional educators develop the intellectual and research skills to refine their practice as leaders in school systems and in higher education.

The Educational Leadership and Policy program has two Doctor of Education program streams:  The EdD Cohort-Based Stream and the Regular EdD Stream.  Individual students are admitted to the Regular EdD Stream each year, but in addition, approximately every three years, a Cohort-Based Stream is offered for working practitioners.  In the Cohort-Based Stream, students must take the courses at particular times with the entire cohort rather than at individual convenience.  Some students find that they benefit from the structure and mutual support of working with the same students through most of their courses and the thesis process.  However in general students should take the Regular EdD Stream unless they are confident they can adjust to the Cohort-Based Stream schedule and are applying in a year in which a cohort stream is being organized.  For information on the next cohort admission, contact the EdD program coordinator, Jim Ryan.

Admission Requirements

The requirements for admission to the EdD program are the same for both the Regular EdD Stream and Cohort-Based Stream.  In addition to the general requirements given in the Minimum Admission and Degree Requirements section, the Educational Leadership and Policy Program specifies the following:

  1. the applicant should hold an appropriate master's degree, with specialization in Educational Leadership and Policy, with high academic standing from a recognized university.  Additional coursework will be required from those who do not have a background in administrative studies;
  2. a master's thesis or qualifying research paper (QRP) will be required;
  3. the applicant must have had a successful leadership experience in education or must show potential for leadership.  Evidence of this will be provided by at least one letter of reference that the applicant must secure from a senior administrator under whom the applicant has worked, commenting on the applicant’s achievement in identifying and solving educational problems; ability to work with people; leadership style; awareness of current social and educational issues;
  4. the applicant must also provide a letter of reference from a professor under whom the applicant has studied, commenting on the applicant’s scholarly achievement.


✦ Regular EdD Stream

The Regular EdD Stream in Educational Leadership and Policy is designed to develop highly competent personnel for senior administrative positions in school systems, colleges, universities, and other educational institutions and agencies and for academic positions in universities and colleges.  The program of study is designed to satisfy the needs of practicing and aspiring educational administrators and academics who, because of the increasing complexity of problems related to the operation of educational organizations, have recognized the need for further professional education.  The emphasis is on developing skills in the application of knowledge from theory and research to practical administrative problems.  To accomplish this, the program of study is flexibly designed and involves numerous collaborative experiences among faculty members, students and administrators.  The EdD degree may be commenced full-time or part-time.  However, a minimum of one year of full-time study is required.  Once enrolled full-time, students must maintain continuous registration and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been completed.  Most courses are scheduled in the evening to accommodate students who are working full time.

Degree Requirements

The Regular EdD degree program is organized into six complementary components:

  1. EdD core seminars, which consist of two half courses (LHA3040H and LHA3041H) that apply theoretical knowledge to problems likely to be experienced by senior administrators in educational organizations;
  2. two of the following three half courses or their equivalent:  LHA3042H, LHA3043H, or LHA3044H (LHA3044H is strongly recommended);
  3. two further courses in Educational Leadership and Policy at the 3000 level.  Students may choose to focus on one of the four research areas:  Policy, Leadership, Change, or Social Diversity;
  4. elective courses:  two are required, although more may be taken.  It is suggested that at least one elective be taken outside of the Educational Leadership and Policy Program.  Individual Reading courses are electives and should not be taken at the beginning of a student’s program;
  5. a comprehensive examination and a thesis proposal hearing;
  6. a doctoral thesis.

A student’s program of study will begin in the Fall Session. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in courses in sequence to capitalize on the benefits of a student cohort. The internship/practicum, if selected, would normally be undertaken in the first term of the Summer Session (May/June); however, it can also be undertaken at other times in consultation with the student's advisor and the Program Coordinator.  Students are responsible for meeting all of the degree requirements as outlined in this Bulletin, unless changes are approved in writing by the doctoral Program Coordinator.

Further information on doctoral programs is available from:
Professor Jim Ryan
Telephone:  416-978-1152
E-mail:  jim.ryan@utoronto.ca

✦ Cohort-Based Stream

The EdD Cohort-Based Stream in Educational Leadership and Policy is intended to develop highly competent leaders for senior administrative positions in school systems, colleges, universities, and other educational institutions (such as the Ministry of Education).  The program is specifically designed to help working professional educators develop the intellectual and research skills to refine their practice as leaders in school systems and in post-secondary education.  Students in this program have the opportunity to undertake a significant academic accomplishment while continuing to work at their current roles.

The focus of the program is on advanced, theory-informed, professional practice.  Reflective practice is used as the lens through which advanced theory and research on policy, leadership, change, and social diversity are applied to practical administrative problems.  The program is designed to satisfy the needs of leaders who recognize the need for further professional inquiry and analysis to deal with the increasing complexity of problems related to the operation of educational organizations.  Through their studies in this program, students will seek to understand theory, make research-informed decisions, examine their own practice, critically evaluate policy, and engage others in collaborative endeavours to improve student learning.

Students in this program may be from post-secondary education, elementary and secondary schools, and other educational institutions.  Diversity is valued and encouraged in order to build wider understandings of the work in educational leadership across organizations.  Students should be aware this program takes a minimum of three years to complete and includes a thesis requirement.

The Cohort-Based Stream will take applications every three or four years.  A minimum of one year of full-time study is required.  Once enrolled full-time, students must maintain continuous registration and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been completed. 

Key aspects of this EdD program option include the following:

Cohort: The program is cohort-based in order to encourage the development of networking and communication skills, to build a collegial community of practice and quality connections between students and faculty.
Sequence: In order to support the cohort model, there is a specified sequence to the required courses.
Practice: The courses are based in the practice of educational administration and focus on reflective practice. Knowledge and theory are applied to address issues and problems the administrators are facing in their work.
Research: This program encourages students to lead future research and evaluation work in educational settings. There is, in addition, a strong reflective practice basis to the course offerings, including one reflective practice course.

Degree Requirements

A minimum of one year of full-time study is required.  Once enrolled full-time, students must maintain continuous registration and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been completed. 

The EdD degree program is organized into five complementary components:

  1. EdD core courses are six mandatory half courses:
    LHA3025H  ‑ Personal and Professional Values of Educational Leadership (examines the personal and professional values and ethics of educational decision-making and policy)
    LHA3040H  ‑ Administrative Theory and Educational Problems I: People and Power in Organizations (applies theory and research to problems of people, power, and policy in organizations)
    LHA3041H  ‑ Administrative Theory and Educational Problems II: Doctoral Seminar on Policy Issues in Education (examines the content, development, and significance of educational policy)
    LHA3042H  ‑ Field Research in Educational Leadership and Policy (a field research course where students examine methods of field research, action research and case studies in educational administration)
    LHA3044H  ‑ Internship/Practicum  in Educational Leadership and Policy (there are three options – all three practical experiences have the same structure: a reflective practice core, an authentic growth problem, and work with a mentor/mentee)
    LHA3047H  ‑ Research Seminar on Research in Authentic Settings (the focus is as a participant in the research – reflective practice and/or action research)
  2. Two other half courses, one of which must be at the 3000-level;
  3. Successful completion of a comprehensive examination;
  4. A thesis proposal hearing;
  5. A doctoral thesis, one component of which may be a document of the kind used in the field, such as a policy document or policy handbook, white paper or restructuring plan.

Further information on doctoral programs is available from:
Professor Jim Ryan
Telephone:  416-978-1152
E-mail:  jim.ryan@utoronto.ca

Doctor of Philosophy

The PhD degree program is comprised of at least six half-courses, four of which normally must be LHA3040H, LHA3042H, LHA3043H, and one elective advanced-level (3000) course in Educational Leadership and Policy.  Students who have already attained an acceptable level of competence in research methodology may be authorized to choose a course in a different area of specialization.  Individual Reading courses are electives and should not be taken at the beginning of a student’s program.

The PhD program may be taken on either a full-time or flexible-time basis.  To be admitted on a flexible-time basis applicants must be working full time and demonstrate connections between their professional work and their proposed course program, or between their professional work and their proposed research.

As students' course selections are not formally authorized, it is the student's responsibility to ensure that the selected program of study meets the departmental requirements.  Students are encouraged, but not required, to concentrate course selection on one of the four research areas:  Policy, Leadership, Change, and Social Diversity.  Any deviation from the program of study described above must be approved in writing by the Educational Leadership and Policy Program Coordinator.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the PhD degree program requires completion of an appropriate master’s degree from a recognized university, with standing equivalent to A-.  Students who have completed an appropriate master's degree that did not include a thesis or research project are required to complete a Qualifying Research Paper to a standard satisfactory to the MA/PhD admissions committee.  Before undertaking a qualifying research project, students should first consult the Program Coordinator.

Degree Requirements

The minimum required number of courses for the PhD degree program for those who have completed an MA within the Department, is six half-courses.  Students with less background in educational administration at the graduate level are usually required to take either eight, ten, or twelve half-courses.

PhD candidates are required to pass a comprehensive examination and a thesis proposal hearing.  A thesis is required.

Further information on doctoral programs is available from:
Professor Jim Ryan
Telephone:  416-978-1152
E-mail: jim.ryan@utoronto.ca 


Program Research Areas

Educational Leadership and Policy Program students are encouraged to concentrate elective coursework in one of four research areas:  Policy, Leadership, Change, and Social Diversity.

Policy

LHA1018H   Political Skill in the Education Arena
LHA1024H   Critical Conversations: Philosophy, Educational Leadership and Educational Policy Studies
LHA1030H   The Legal Context of Education
LHA1045H   Language Policy Across the Curriculum
LHA1065H   Educational Equity and Excellence in International Comparison
LHA2006H   Educational Finance and the Economics
LHA3030H   Advanced Legal Issues in Education
LHA3045H   Educational Policy and Program Evaluation

Leadership

LHA1012H   Organizational Culture and Decision-Making
LHA1016H   School Program Development and Implementation
LHA1026H   Evaluation of Professional Personnel in Education
LHA1042H   Educational Leadership and Cultural Diversity
LHA1047H   Managing Changes in Classroom Practice
LHA1048H   Educational Leadership and School Improvement
LHA3025H   Personal and Professional Values of Educational Leadership
LHA3047H   Research Seminar on Leadership and Educational Change

Change

LHA1020H   Teachers and Educational Change
LHA1025H   School Effectiveness and School Improvement
LHA1047H   Managing Changes in Classroom Practice
LHA1048H   Educational Leadership and School Improvement

Social Diversity

LHA1019H   Diversity and the Ethics of Educational Administration
LHA1042H   Educational Leadership and Cultural Diversity
LHA1065H   Educational Equity and Excellence in International Comparison
LHA3055H   Democratic Values, Student Engagement and Democratic Leadership

 

 

Higher Education Program

Higher Education Program

Degrees

Master of Education

The Higher Education Program offers an MEd in Higher Education including specializations in Health Professional Education, and Student Development and Student Services in Postsecondary Education.  The programs can be completed on either a full-time or part-time basis.  Students in the MEd in Higher Education are required to pursue the MEd Option IV program of study.  Option IV is also available in a cohort format.  Students in the MEd in Health Professional Education register in the MEd Option IV program of study and, for those planning a career in research, a transfer to Option II is possible.  Students who entered the MEd Health Professional Education prior to 2011 may wish to transfer from Option I into Option IV.  Students who prefer to write the comprehensive exam as part of their program may choose to stay in Option I.  The Program Coordinator can provide more information on the MEd in Health Professional Education. Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.

Degree Requirements

MEd in Higher Education (Non-Cohort Format) - Option IV

  1. a half course, LHA1803H - Recurring Issues in Postsecondary Education
  2. a half course in research methods approved by the faculty advisor
  3. eight half-courses, of which at least three must be in Higher Education

MEd in Higher Education (Leadership Cohort Format) - Option IV

This option will be of particular interest to working professionals and postsecondary leaders since it offers the flexibility of cohort based and compressed format scheduling.

  1. a half course, LHA1803H – Recurring Issues in Postsecondary Education
  2. a half course in research methods approved by the faculty advisor
  3. a half course in equity approved by the faculty advisor
  4. five other sequential half courses (cohort based)
  5. two elective half courses

For information about the MEd in Higher Education (Leadership Cohort Format), contact:
Katharine Janzen, Coordinator, MEd in Higher Education Leadership Cohorts
Email: katharine.janzen@utoronto.ca 

MEd in Health Professional Education - Option IV

Ten half-courses in total:

  1. a half course, LHA1803H - Recurring Issues in Postsecondary Education
  2. six half-courses, of which at least two must be courses in the Health Profession Education Field and two must be courses in general Higher Education
  3. a half course in research methods approved by the faculty advisor
  4. one half-course, either an elective or a required, must have an equity focus
  5. one additional half-course

MEd in Health Professional Education - Option II

  1. a half course, LHA1803H - Recurring Issues in Postsecondary Education
  2. a half course in research methods approved by the faculty advisor
  3. six half-courses, of which at least two must be courses in the Health Profession Education Field and two must be courses in general Higher Education
  4. one half-course, either elective or required, must have an equity focus
  5. a research project (Master’s Research Paper)

For information about the Health Professional MEd, contact:
Linda Muzzin, Associate Professor, Health Professions MEd Coordinator
Email: l.muzzin@utoronto.ca


MEd in Student Development and Student Services in Higher Education - Option IV

  1. one half-course, LHA1803H - Recurring Issues in Postsecondary Education
  2. three half-courses in Student Development and Student Services: LHA1844H, LHA1854H, LHA1856H
  3. six other half-courses, of which  one half-course must be from the Higher Education Program, one half-course must be in Research Methods (approved by the faculty advisor), and one half-course must have an equity focus
  4. equity-focused courses must be approved by the student's faculty advisor. See the course listing for samples.
  5. depending upon an individual student's professional experience, students may be advised to take LHA1853H Introduction to Student Services

For information about the Student Development and Student Services MEd, contact:
Stephanie Waterman, Associate Professor
Email: stephanie.waterman@utoronto.ca


Master of Arts

Applicants must submit written evidence of their ability to define a research question or problem, to devise a research design, and to analyze and report research findings, all in an academically rigorous manner.  This evidence must be submitted with the application.  The evidence may be an undergraduate thesis, long essays or papers written for undergraduate courses, reports and studies written as part of employment, or other documents that demonstrate the applicant's ability to conduct research at the master's degree level. Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.

Degree Requirements

The MA program consists of eight half-courses, which must include:

  1. a half course, LHA1803H - Recurring Issues in Postsecondary Education
  2. a half course in research methods approved by the faculty advisor
  3. six additional half-courses, of which at least three must be in Higher Education
  4. a thesis
     

Doctor of Education 

The EdD degree program may be commenced either full-time or part-time.  In either case, however, a minimum of one-year of full-time study is required.  Once enrolled full-time, students must maintain continuous registration and pay the full-time fee until all degree requirements have been completed. Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.

Applicants who hold an MEd or other non-thesis master's degree must submit written evidence of their ability to define a research question or problem, to devise a research design, and to analyze and report research findings, all in an academically rigorous manner.  This evidence may be an undergraduate or master’s thesis, long essays or papers written for master’s level courses, reports and studies written as part of employment, or other documents that demonstrate the applicant’s ability to conduct research at the doctoral level.  This evidence must be submitted with the application.

Degree Requirements

  1. a minimum of eight half-courses beyond a relevant and acceptable MEd or MA.  In individual cases, students without a master’s degree in higher education but who have a closely related degree with work experience related to higher education may be admitted, but additional courses in Higher Education may be required.  Normally they would include:
  2. a Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
  3. a thesis reporting the results of original research on an applied topic in post-secondary education

Doctor of Philosophy

The PhD program may be taken on either a full-time or a flexible-time basis.  To be admitted on a flexible-time basis applicants normally should be active professionals who demonstrate connections between their professional work and their proposed course program, and between their professional work and their proposed thesis research. Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.

Applicants who hold an MEd or other non-thesis master's degree must submit written evidence of their ability to define a research question or problem, to devise a research design, and to analyze and report research findings, all in an academically rigorous manner.  This evidence may be an undergraduate or master’s thesis, long essays or papers written for master’s level courses, reports and studies written as part of employment, or other documents that demonstrate the applicant’s ability to conduct research at the doctoral level.  This evidence must be submitted with the application.

Degree Requirements

  1. a minimum of six half-courses beyond a relevant and acceptable MEd or MA. In individual cases, students without a master’s degree in higher education but who have a closely related degree with work experience related to higher education may be admitted, but additional courses in Higher Education may be required. Normally these would include:
  2. a Doctoral Comprehensive Examination
  3. thesis reporting the results of original research in postsecondary education

Further information is available from:
Professor Creso Sa, Higher Education Program Coordinator (as of July 1, 2016)
Email: c.sa@utoronto.ca 
Telephone: 416 978-1206

PhD in Higher Education for Community College Leaders (CCL Cohort)

The flexible-time PhD in Higher Education for Community College Leaders launches a new cohort every three or four years.  The admission and degree requirements for the CCL Cohort are generally the same as for the flexible-time PhD degree program.  The main differences in focus and delivery are:

  1. the CCL Cohort is focussed on the study of community colleges
  2. is delivered in a cohort format
  3. requires a minimum of six half-courses
  4. full-time registration must be maintained from September through August each year.  Flexible-time PhD students can request a switch to part-time status after four years of full-time study

For more information about the Community College Leaders Cohort, contact:
Leesa Wheelahan, Associate Professor and William G. Davis Chair in Community College Leadership
E-mail: leesa.wheelahan@utoronto.ca


Higher Education Research Centre

Centre for the Study of Canadian and International Higher Education (CIHE)

Director:  Creso Sá
Core Members:  Ruth Childs, Ruth Hayhoe, Katharine Janzen, Glen Jones, Linda Muzzin, Stephanie Waterman, Leesa Wheelahan
Department:  Leadership, Higher and Adult Education
Location:  252 Bloor Street West, Room 6-238
Telephone:  416-978-1206
E-mail: c.sa@utoronto.ca
Website: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/cihe/Home/index.html

The Higher Education program faculty are part of the Centre for the Study of Canadian and International Higher Education (CIHE), which has four main objectives: 1) support and promote research on the study of Canadian and international higher education; 2) disseminate research findings through Centre publications, conferences, symposia, and seminars; 3) contribute to and support informed public debate on Canadian and international higher education; and 4) create a research community of engaged scholars, graduate students, and others interested in the study of higher education. 

Leadership, Higher and Adult Education Courses


Adult Education and Community Development Program Courses
LHA1100H    Introduction to Adult Education

Designed to assist students to develop an understanding of and an identity with the field of adult education. Major philosophical, historical, and conceptual bases are examined; also contemporary agencies and programs, issues, and trends in the practice of adult education. It is required that all Master's students include either LHA1100H (previously AEC1100H) or LHA1102H (previously AEC1102H) in their program of study.

S. Mojab, J. Sumner, J. Magnusson

LHA1101H    Program Planning in Adult Education

This course introduces students to basic principles and processes of program planning, and how they apply to adult educational contexts. Relevant literatures and cases will be examined to illustrate different approaches to planning with particular emphasis on non-profit, public sector and community settings.

Staff

LHA1102H    Community Development: Innovative Models

This course attempts to come to grips with the meaning of community development in a highly networked, increasingly information-dependent society. The course looks at such issues as the relationships between community organizing and community development and the role of social capital in community economic development. Models of community development that involve government programs such as social housing and community health centres are considered as are market-based approaches involving micro-lending, co-operatives and social enterprises. It is required that all Master's students include either LHA1100H (previously AEC1100H) or LHA1102H (previously AEC1102H) in their program of study.

J. Quarter, S. Ryan

LHA1103H    Introduction to Research Methods in Adult Education [RM]

This course provides an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods and theoretical perspectives.  It is designed as an exploration into a range of research / inquiry methods appropriate for adult education and community development.  The course will examine the underlying philosophical assumptions of these methods, and the implications that these assumptions have for framing research questions, data collection, analysis, and dissemination strategies.  It will also provide opportunities to engage in practical, hands-on experience with developing research questions, data collection, and data analysis.  The students will also be given an opportunity to reflect on the ethical, procedural, and political implications of research work and what it means to be “the researcher” and “the researched”.

S. Ryan

LHA1104H    Community Education and Organizing

This course involves the study of a variety of perspectives in critical and community education as they relate to development and social change. Key issues in community education and organizing will be examined through the study of classic popular education, community organizing, feminist, environmental, socialist, anti-colonial, anti-racist and Indigenous sources.

A.R. Miles

LHA1105H    Introduction to Qualitative Research (Part I) [RM]

This course articulates various theoretic grounding for qualitative research and helps students become conversant with a wide variety of qualitative methodologies (i.e., grounded theory, feminist interviewing, ethnography, participatory research, biographic analysis, arts-informed inquiry, aboriginal research methodologies and institutional ethnography.) Gathering of information through observation, participatory observation, dialogue, and collection of documents will all be considered. Emphasis is on both understanding and practice. Learners will design or co-design a concrete piece of research and take it through the ethical review process. They will also present on at least one methodology. In line with this, they will learn about ethical conundrums, about matching methodologies with objectives and values, about methods for choosing participants. There is special emphasis on becoming critically aware as researchers - on understanding and integrating issues of power and difference.

B. Burstow

LHA1106H    Introduction to Qualitative Research (Part II) [RM]

This course begins where Part I leaves off. Learners will deepen their knowledge of a wide variety of qualitative research methodologies. They will gain skills interviewing, judging research, exploring dilemmas, and becoming critically aware as researchers. Their primary activity will be carrying out and completing the research project designed and approved in Part I. Giving and getting help from other classmates is an integral part of the process. Additional methodologies explored in this course include: action research, critical discourse analysis, and Freirian-based research.

Prerequisite: LHA1105H/AEC1405H
B. Burstow

LHA1107H    Developing and Leading High Performing Teams: Theory and Practice

This course examines the application of small group theory and leadership models to team development within organizational settings. It addresses such issues as power and difference among members, equity in leadership, peer performance assessment, multi-rater feedback and team process consultation. It provides an opportunity to examine, both theoretically and experientially, the development of a team as it forms, confronts interpersonal and group conflict, and evolves from dependence on the team leader to interdependence and shared leadership among team members. This course is particularly relevant to current workplace designs, where matrix models, cross-functional team arrangements and ad hoc project teams dominate new organizational forms. The course is held on seven alternate weeks for a full day each session, in order to permit both conceptual exploration and the application of theory to actual team development.

Staff

LHA1109H    Creative Empowerment Work with the Disenfranchised

This is a Social Movement course. This course will be of interest to a wide range of practitioners, including: activists, popular educators, and counsellors. The context in which it is offered is a world increasingly populated by disenfranchised people. The intent is to help practitioners gain a fuller understanding of the populations in question and become more skilled and creative as allies and activists. The specific populations focused on are: psychiatric survivors, people who are homeless, people who have been imprisoned, people who use illicit drugs, undocumented people, and sex trade workers. Learners will gain knowledge of the ABC's of strategic activism, with particular emphasis on how to modify strategy to fit the populations and movements in question. An accompanying emphasis is use of the arts in resistance work with these populations. Examples of art forms drawn on include: theatre (including theatre of the oppressed), puppetry, and video-making. Popular education is integrated. Perspectives include: feminism, anti-racism, Marxism, transformative justice, antipsychiatry, labeling theory, anarchism, and the philosophies of nonviolent resistance. The classes go between lectures, student presentations, film and video analysis, rehearsals, consultations, exercises, and guest presentations. Activism within the larger community is an integral part of the course.

B. Burstow

LHA1110H    Approaches to Teaching Adults

A theoretical and experiential study of strategies for teaching adults, and of the procedures educators can use in group settings to enhance the development of learning processes. Students will explore personal institutional and societal variables that shape teaching/Learning environments, examine the factors that promote or hinder success, experience and analyze different teaching approaches, and develop a personal approach to the teaching/learning process.

Staff

LHA1111H    Working with Survivors of Trauma

This course explores the nature(s) of trauma and the different ways of working with survivors. The emphasis is on difference-different types of trauma, different ways of coping, and the significance of different and multiple identities. Work with adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse is particularly highlighted. Other areas include survivors of: homophobic assault, ritual abuse, residential schools, refugee traumatization, war trauma, trauma associated with imprisonment, trauma associated with psychiatric intervention, and second generation trauma (e.g., children of Holocaust survivors). The trauma inherent in systemic oppressions, the fact that we live in an oppressive and violent society, and the implications for practitioners is emphasized throughout. While the primary emphasis in on practitioners as counsellors, other roles are also considered, including: advocates, befrienders, community workers, and literacy workers. Practitioner self-care in light of vicarious traumatization is given special consideration. Attention is divided between individual work, group work, and community work. The course is counter-hegemonic. Dominant perspectives include: critical theory, feminism, and existentialism. Permission of Instructor is required to enrol. Failure to contact the instructor for a screening interview well in advance (at bonnie.burstow@utoronto.ca) may result in not being able to take the course.

B. Burstow

LHA1113H    Gender and Race at Work

This course will focus on gender processes in work settings. We will identify patriarchal rules and expectations which run through contemporary workplaces (factories, offices, homes, hospitals, shopfloors, etc.) and propose ways in which normalizing discourses which reify gender hierarchies can be challenged. The course will focus on how ''gender,'' ''race'' and ''class'' can be conceptualized as processes rather than demographic attributes possessed by individual workers. We will trace the connections between gendered jobs and gendered workers and explore how individuals learn to ''do gender'' in organizational settings.

K. Mirchandani or Staff

LHA1119H    Creating a Learning Organization

Peter Senge's concept of the Learning Organization has now been embedded in organizational thinking since 1990. Many organizations have struggled to create learning cultures with varying degrees of success and much has been discovered about the factors that contribute to or inhibit this success. In this course, we will look at the Learning Organization as Senge and others have conceived it through the lens of productive conversation. The course will employ a variety of learning strategies including student presentations, theory bursts and organizational simulation. As part of our process, we will examine our own ability to create a learning organization within the class and the impact that our conversations have on the quality of our own learning.

Staff

LHA1122H    Practicum in Adult Education and Community Development (Pass/Fail)

Practicum in Adult Education and Community Development (Pass/Fail) This course provides an opportunity for students to put theoretical ideas they have learned in other courses into practice. Students will identify a placement setting and develop a project in consultation with the instructor. The practicum can be situated within any setting (examples include schools, private sector organizations, community groups, hospitals, etc.) within local, regional, national or international contexts. Suitable projects may include field-based work or internships which leads to the development of an associated research project, reflective paper, or the development of a curriculum or programme. Weekly discussions will normally be arranged which will provide for support, feedback and reflection.

J. Sumner

LHA1147H    Women, Migration, and Work

This course will focus on the gender, race, and class dimensions of population movement and forced migration. The focal point of the course will be the understanding of work-related experiences of migrant and refugee women. Reading theories of migration in the context of circulation, distribution, and appropriation of capital, we explore the flow of migration and labour market in Canada and globally. Two forms of movements will be explored: movements of people and movements of jobs. The adjustment and transformation of market economy in response to these movements will be studied. Emphasis will be on the challenges forced by women migrants and refugees as they navigate changing labour markets in search of waged work.

S. Mojab

LHA1132H    Special Topics in Women in Development and Community Transformation (Master's Level)

This half course will be taught by an eminent Indigenous or 'third world' feminist scholar in her own area of expertise. See online course offerings for full description of current Visitor's course at: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/cwse/

A.R. Miles

LHA1141H    Organizations and the Adult Educator: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives on Organization Development

This course provides a theoretical framework for the adult educator's work within organizational settings. A variety of methods, including readings, audio-tapes, guest speakers and group discussion provide a broad overview of the evolution of Organization Development from early management theory to current practices in the field. The course offers an opportunity to evolve one's own perspective as a practising or aspiring organization consultant and provides a good introduction for those new to the field.

Staff

LHA1143H    Feminist Perspectives on Society and Education

This course will provide students with little background in feminism  and students wishing to renew and deepen their knowledge of feminism with an overview of: 1) the principles of feminist social analyses and social practice, and 2) feminist perspectives on current issues. It will be useful for students who are facing issues of gender in their research, their work, or their personal lives and are interested in how gender intersects with race, class and sexuality.

A.R. Miles

LHA1145H    Participatory Research in the Community and the Workplace [RM]

This course examines the theory and practice of conducting participatory and collaborative research that bridges the academic, workplace, and community divide, with an emphasis on research from feminist, anti-racist, and anti-colonial perspectives. In addition to readings, students will undertake a research project as part of the course requirement.

Staff

LHA1146H    Women, War, and Learning

This course will focus on the impact of war on women and their rights. We will engage in critical analyses of contemporary conflicts and their impact on gender, race and learning. Specifically, we will examine the link between war, globalization, nation-states and learning and the link between non-state, non-market forces and learning. We will look at current feminist approaches to the study of war, violence and women's resistance and learning. The theoretical approach in this course is anti-racist and anti-imperialist feminism.

S. Mojab

LHA1148H    An Introduction to Workplace, Organizational and Economic Democracy

This course explores theories and practices of democratizing work, organizations, and the economy. It both looks at the ways workers and communities can take stewardship of working life, work organizations, and the economy and critically assesses management strategies of workplace and organizational participation. The course also homes in on how contemporary alternative economic arrangements, the social and solidarity economy, and environmental and social movements prefigure the expansion of economic democracy and social change while they, at the same time, directly connect the ongoing crisis spawned by neoliberal capitalism. The course applies theory to practice via multiple case studies from the global North and South and student' own experiences with work and participative organizations in the for-profit, not-for-profit, and public sectors. Throughout, the course interlaces explorations of workplace, organizational, and economic democracy with critical adult learning theory and practice.

M. Vieta

LHA1150H    Critical Perspectives on Organizational Change

Critical approaches to organizations focus on how workplace change and development is experienced by diverse groups of women and men who work within organizations. Through this course, students will have the opportunity to develop analyses of language, power and inequality in a variety of organizational settings (companies, factories, NGOs, non-profits, cooperatives, community groups, government units, schools, family businesses, etc.) We will explore the methods frequently used to ''restructure'' these organizations (such as downsizing, outsourcing, contingent just-in-time policies) as well as develop critiques of recent trends which emphasize ''empowerment'', ''TQM'', ''organizational learning'' and ''reengineering'' and reflect on alternative organizational models with a vision of social change.

M. Vieta

LHA1152H    Individual Reading and Research in Adult Education: Master's Level

Specialized exploration, under the direction of a faculty member, of topics of particular interest to the student that are not included in existing courses. While credit is not given for a thesis topic proper, the study may be closely related to such a topic. Guidelines and Form are available from the website: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/ro/UserFiles/File/Graduate%20Registration/GradReg_ReqIndReadRsch.pdf This course can also be designed as a field-based practicum in adult education and/or community development in an agreed setting. The course will include reflection, research, and writing on issues raised in practice.

Staff

LHA1160H    Introduction to Transformative Learning Studies

This is the foundation course for Transformative Learning studies. It is designed to introduce students to a global planetary perspective. The concept of a global world order will be examined from historic, critical, and visionary perspectives. Issues of development/underdevelopment, human rights, and social justice perspectives are considered. A critical understanding of social power relations will be highlighted in the areas of gender, class, and race dynamics. The topics are approached as interdependent dimensions within a holistic education perspective.

Staff

LHA1171H    Foundations of Aboriginal Education in Canada

This course is designed to provide an interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of Aboriginal education in Canada. Emphasis is on understanding the influences of policies, programs, and institutions that affect the Aboriginal community in respect to Aboriginal education. One of the major data sources will be the report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. Aboriginal guest speakers will also comment on selected topics. Components of this course will include the Aboriginal world view; contemporary history/politics relevant to Aboriginal Peoples; and Aboriginal education and healing. Treaties were originally signed between First Nations and the Federal Government of Canada. These treaties for the most part have not been honoured. In this course we shall discuss the ways and means to redress this situation as we focus more specifically on issues relevant to Aboriginal education.

J.P. Restoule

LHA1180H    Aboriginal World Views: Implications for Education

This course provide a deeper understanding of Aboriginal worldviews and an appreciation of how this knowledge can enhance teaching, learning and research. Learners will examine philosophical views shared by Aboriginal people while honoring a diversity of identities, culture, language, and geographic locations. Course content may include Aboriginal cognitive styles, values and ethics, traditional teachings and indigenous methodologies.

This course will promote an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal perspectives and explore strategies for integrating this knowledge into the work of educators and researchers.

J.P. Restoule

LHA1181H    Embodied Learning and Qi Gong
The objectives of this course are to (a) disrupt prevailing western scientific knowledge and education that privilege the intellect (frequently equated with the mind) over the body-spirit; and (b) explore notions of embodiment and what it may mean to cultivate embodied ways of knowing and learning. We achieve these objectives by (i) reading and looking at relevant materials that conceptualize body-mind-spirit as an interconnected whole, with an emphasis on Traditional Chinese Medicine; (ii) recording our reflections in a journal; and (iii) conducting Qi Gong (a form of ancient Chinese breathing and meditative exercises) as an experiential way of exploring embodied learning. In addition to gaining knowledge from course contents, students will acquire skills in group process.
Staff

LHA1182H    Nonprofits, Co-operatives and the Social Economy: An Overview

This course discusses critical issues facing nonprofits, co-operatives, and the social economy, which is a bridging concept for organizations pursuing a social purpose. The course examines the differing organizational forms and accountability structures and the challenges faced by these organizations. Issues to be considered are: volunteering and how it can be valued; social enterprises and their increasing prominence in an age of government retrenchment; community economic development in low-income communities; and civil society organizations and their functions in encouraging social engagement and challenging social norms. The course views the social economy in relation to the government and business sectors, and attempts to understand the multiple roles of organizations in the social economy as they interact with the rest of society. The course materials include innovative case studies and adult education materials.

J. Quarter, S. Ryan, M. Vieta

LHA1183H    Master's Research Seminar

This seminar is designed to support Master's students in the process of writing a thesis or a substantial research paper. Issues to be discussed will include: choosing a topic, writing a proposal, developing an argument, selecting a supervisor, and organizing the writing process. The class will be participatory, and weekly readings will be assigned on the various parts of the thesis-writing journey. Class members will also receive instruction on effective library research techniques. In addition, students will have the opportunity to read completed theses and proposals. The course is required for all M.A. students. Full time M.A. students are encouraged to take this course at the start of their program. Part-time M.A. students should ideally take this course when they are ready to start working on their thesis proposals. The course is also open to M.Ed. Students who are interested in gaining research experience by writing a substantial research paper equivalent to a thesis.

K. Mirchandani

LHA1184H    Aboriginal Knowledge: Implications for Education

This course will explore Indigenous ways of knowing and knowledge systems and how this knowledge might inform the work of teaching, learning and research. Course content may include indigenous research protocols, decolonizing methodologies, ethics and politics of researching and teaching in Aboriginal communities, indigenous knowledge in the academy, intellectual property rights, curriculum development and innovations in Aboriginal education. Traditional teachings from respected Elders may be incorporated into learning. For learners with a research focus, this course enables inquiry into the production of knowledge, from both western and indigenous perspectives. For those interested in education implications, the course provides a footing in the workings and characteristics of indigenous knowing which will aid their pedagogical practices in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal contexts.

J.P. Restoule

LHA1185H    Leadership in Organizations: Changing Perspectives

This course provides you with opportunities to examine current principles, practices, trends and issues related to organizational leadership, and apply these concepts to your own professional practice. You will explore leadership styles, practices, tasks and models, and are encouraged to reflect on and analyze your own leadership experiences in light of theories examined.

Staff

LHA1186H    Organizational Change in the Nonprofit and Public Sectors

This course explores concepts, practices and processes in organizations, with specific emphasis on the challenges and strategies for addressing the human aspects of change. The course combines an experimental approach and critical analysis to examine issues in organizational change. Students will gain understanding of theories, practices and the importance of Human Resources Development, Human Resources Management and Labour Relations principles in planning and implementing effective organizational change.

Staff

LHA1190H    Community Healing and Peacebuilding

This course will examine issues faced by individuals, groups and communities trapped in ongoing cycles of violence due to historic and current traumas, and systemic injustice. The course will focus on healing and peacebuilding initiatives at the community level and will draw on diverse cultural traditions. The course will acquaint students with current theoretical concepts of community healing and peacebuilding. Participants will also develop skills, values and attitudes that will enable them to work towards healing, reconciliation, and comprehensive, viable peace. The notion of praxis is key, and students will be given the opportunity to reflect on their own practice. InterChange: International Institute for Community-Based Peacebuilding, of which the course instructor is a founder and director, will provide a useful framework for inquiry, as well as opportunities for student exchanges, research projects and practicums.

Staff

LHA1192H    Adult Literacies in Social Justice Perspective

Governments, business and the media commonly point to Literacy as a solution to social and economic exclusion. In this story, people can overcome exclusion by becoming more Literate, that is, by acquiring the standardized, dominant language and literacy practices used in schools, government and the media. But recent international theories of adult literacy point in another direction, emphasizing the social, economic and creative importance of the multiple 'literacies' people use every day to sustain their lives and communities. Drawing on these theories, variously known as social practice theories, socio-cultural theories, or ''The New Literacy Studies'', this course explores how people actually use written texts, where, and with whom, and the implications of multiple literacies for building more inclusive communities.

Staff

LHA1193H    Adult Education for Sustainability

This course will introduce students to the emerging field of adult education for sustainability. As a form of critical pedagogy, it concentrates on the interface between the education of adults and the question of sustainability. The task of adult education for sustainability involves helping us to learn our way out of unsustainable modes of thinking, feeling and acting about ourselves, our communities and the wider world, and to learn our way in to more sustainable ways of life. This course will cover issues associated with adult education for sustainability, such as globalization, sustainable development, community, environmental integrity, social justice, gender, energy and ecological literacy. It will also examine the role of adult education in exploring alternative models to our current unsustainable direction.

J. Sumner

LHA1194H    Cyber Literacy, Adult Education and Community Development

Drawing from a number of disciplinary perspectives, including education, sociology, social psychology and communication studies, this course provides an opportunity to interrogate the potential relationship of the Internet to adult education and community development. The main objectives of this course are: to engage participants in an examination of the potential influence of the Internet on key adult education praxis areas such as community development, literacy and nonprofit organizations, to provide participants with a critical framework for analyzing Internet mediated environments; and to explore Internet resources that may be used in conjunction with traditional community development and adult education practice. The course is conducted using a seminar format where discussion is informed by weekly readings. 

S. Ryan

LHA1195H    Technology@Work: The Internet in Workplace Learning and Change

 This course examines the evolving interface between emerging technologies, primarily information and communication technologies, and the workplace. Drawing from various disciplinary perspectives, including education, sociology, social psychology and communication studies, students will explore the impact of technology on both for profit and nonprofit enterprises. Some topics that will be covered include issues of equality, virtual teamwork, the network economy, surveillance and the future of authority. The course is designed as a mixed or blended course, which means that it is taught through face-to-face and online sessions and activities. A mixed course format allows participants to experience diverse technology platforms and applications and illustrates course content.

S. Ryan or Staff

LHA1196H    Walking Together, Talking Together: The Praxis of Reconciliation

Humans are fundamentally social creatures, depending on good relationships with those around us for optimal functioning. When harm is done in these relationships people suffer. If restoration does not occur and the underlying structural and cultural issues are not addressed, suffering and violence will likely continue, whether acted out inwardly within the individual or group, or outwardly, directed to others. Reconciliation, the complex, dynamic, long-term process of restoring relationships, structures and identities after violent conflict, is a concept that is becoming increasingly relevant. This course has been developed to study reconciliation in accordance with the following principles: reconciliation is necessary; reconciliation is complex; reconciliation is praxis; and reconciliation has implications for adult education and community development.

Staff

LHA1197H    The Pedagogy of Food

Following the lead of American essayist Wendell Berry, who has argued that eating is an agricultural act, this course will focus on the idea that eating is also a pedagogical act. What do we learn, and unlearn, from the food we eat? How is the food on our plate connected to such issues as food systems, food politics, food justice, food security, food sovereignty and food movements? Can we consume our way into a more sustainable future, or does this simply reinforce our current unsustainable way of life? This course will explore these and other questions, keeping in mind that food can be a catalyst for learning, resistance and change.

J. Sumner

LHA3102H    Doctoral Thesis Seminar (Pass/Fail)

This seminar is designed for first or second year doctoral students. It will explore key elements of the doctoral studies journey: crafting a researchable topic, developing a thesis proposal, choosing a committee, planning for comprehensives, fostering effective writing strategies, planning for publication. Required activities will include one final piece of writing related to proposal development.

Staff

LHA3103H    Teaching about Global and Social Issues

This course deals with issues around globalization, sustainable ecological development, social issues at both a global and local level dealing with diversities and social power. The course will also deal with North-South tensions in knowledge production and legitimization. There is also a concern to look at our present history from a planetary perspective that embraces post-colonial development issues, and feminism in the global context. There will be an emphasis on exploring and identifying teaching perspectives dealing with the thematic issues of the course. Suggested background: Courses LHA1146H, LHA1160H, LHA3104H.

A.R. Miles

LHA3104H    Adult Education, Marxism and Feminism

This course will examine adult education in global contexts with specific focus on ''Third World'' societies. It will offer a critical review of the relationship between adult education, modes of production, and state. In this course we will draw on Marxist, feminist, anti-racist, and ecological theoretical debates. Applying critical comparative analysis, the course will examine the role of adult education in liberation movements and democratization of state and society. We will study the role of adult education in building a dynamic civil society and challenges we are facing towards creating a democratic civil society.

S. Mojab or Staff

LHA3119H    Global Perspectives on Feminist Community Development and Community Transformation

The course provides an opportunity for students to study globally aware women's theory and practice in community development and community transformation. It examines the general principles of this practice, the major challenges faced by activists in Canada and abroad, the growing regional and international women's networks supporting this practice, and current debates among women locally and within these networks.

A.R. Miles or Staff

LHA3131H    Special Topics in Adult Education (Doctoral)

A course that will examine in depth a topic of particular relevance not already covered in regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session course schedules.

Staff

LHA3133H    Special Topics in Aboriginal Community Learning: Current Issues and Practices

This half course will be taught once a year by a visiting Aboriginal Elder, traditional teacher or community leader. Each visitor will call on his or her particular area of interest and experience to develop a course dealing with current issues of Aboriginal community development, learning and transformation.

NOTE: Course descriptions will change year to year based on the expertise and experience of the instructor
J.P. Restoule and Staff

LHA3152H    Individual Reading and Research in Adult Education: Doctoral Level

Specialized exploration, under the direction of a faculty member, of topics of particular interest to the student that are not included in existing courses. While credit is not given for a thesis topic proper, the study may be closely related to such a topic. Guidelines and forms are available from the website: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/ro/UserFiles/File/Graduate%20Registration/GradReg_ReqIndReadRsch.pdf. This course can also be designed as a field-based practicum in adult education and/or community development in an agreed setting. The course will include reflection, research, and writing on issues raised in practice.

Staff

LHA3153H    Individual Reading and Research in Women in Development and Community Transformation: Doctoral Level

Specialized exploration, under the direction of a faculty member and an eminent Visiting Scholar in the Visitor's area of specialized knowledge. Information about past Visitors is available on the web at: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/cwse/.
For more information contact A.R.Miles.

A. R. Miles

LHA3180H    Global Governance and Educational Change: the Politics of International Cooperation in Education

This course looks at the role of international level actors and networks in shaping domestic educational policies and producing globalized models for learning often underappreciated in the study of educational policy and change. This course reviews various theoretical approaches to the study of international relations in the field of education, considers recent efforts to study the globalization of educational policy, and then turns to the activities of a variety of organizations and networks, intergovernmental and nongovernmental, which have developed global level mandates in education. Topics include: education in the global development regime; the educational activities of the World Bank, UNESCO the OECD and the World Trade Organization; and transnational advocacy and NGO networks in education.

Prerequisite: CIE1001H
Staff

LHA3181H    Feminist Standpoints

This course will provide a supportive environment for the systematic study of feminist standpoint theory; the differences  between  standpoint and post-structural  theory; the differing implications of these approaches for addressing race, class and gender in practice and theory. Course topics will be chosen in consultation with students to incorporate students' particular research interests. Students who wish to consider standpoint and post-structural theory in relation to other social groups and social movements are welcome to do so in their course work including their course papers.

A.R. Miles

LHA3182H    Citizenship Learning and Participatory Democracy

This seminar focuses on the connections between lifelong citizenship learning and participatory democracy. We start by analyzing theoretical debates on citizenship, democracy, governance, and political participation, and the implications of these theories for the study and the practice of citizenship education, on the one hand, and of participatory democracy, on the other. Next, we review key prior research findings on citizenship learning (in formal, nonformal and informal settings), and will examine different models of citizenship education, looking at their purposes, methods, contents and impact. With this background, we identify and interpret our own experiences of lifelong and lifewide civic and political learning. In the second part of the course, we concentrate on the pedagogical dimensions of experimental designs of participatory democracy, with a focus on participatory workplace and organizations. We analyze selected Canadian and international case studies of participatory democracy, and discuss experiments like worker recuperated firms, Indigenous practices, and alternative economies. Throughout the course, the study of lifelong learning and democratic citizenship is related to discussions about the state, the market and civil society, global-local dynamics, inequalities, power, social reproduction and social change. The course includes a variety of formats (class discussions, instructor's lectures, videos, guest speakers, group work, and visits to community gatherings).

M. Vieta

LHA3183H    Introduction to Institutional Ethnography [RM]

This course is a comprehensive introduction to institutional ethnography (IE), a powerful method of social analysis developed by feminist sociologist, Dorothy E. Smith, Professor Emerita at OISE/UT. IE starts with people's everyday experiences, and provides a way of exploring how the ruling of institutions shape their experiences and practices and lead to the disjunctures that people experience in their everyday lives. The course begins with the epistemology and theoretical traditions that inform IE, discusses IE's core concepts and procedures, examines the major tools associated with IE, and provides opportunities for practice. Explorations will include, but will not be limited to, textual analysis; the overlapping relations of gender, race, class and other axes of difference in organizations; and the combining of institutional ethnography with other critical forms of inquiry such as critical discourse analysis. Both Dorothy Smith and George Smith style institutional ethnography are explored, that, is, both institutional ethnography for understanding and institutional ethnography for social change. Pre-requisite: At least one research methods course at the masters level, or by permission of instructor. 

B. Burstow

LHA3184H    Indigenous Research Methodologies [RM]

This course will provide an overview of indigenous research methodologies and an introduction to planning research projects that are relevant, respectful, responsible and reciprocal in relation to indigenous communities. Students will engage in a dialogue on research ethics and protocols as they relate to working with indigenous peoples and communities.

J.P Restoule

WPL1131H    Introduction to Workplace Learning and Social Change

This course will introduce students to work and learning trends in Canada and internationally, with a focus on the relationships between workplace learning and social change. There are three intellectual objectives of this course. The first objective is to situate workplace learning within broader social trends such as globalization, neo-liberalism and organizational restructuring. Second, the course allows for an exploration of the connections between learning as an individual phenomenon and learning as a social/organizational and social policy phenomenon. Finally, a third objective of the course is to highlight the learning strategies that seek to foster social change through greater equality of power, inclusivity, participatory decision-making and economic democracy.

K. Mirchandani, M. Vieta

WPL2944H    Sociology of Learning and Social Movements

The goal of this course is to develop a working dialogue across two separate bodies of research --  learning theory & social movement theory -- that to date have encountered one another only rarely and when so, virtually always inadequately. Our goals are to understand knowledge production, distribution, storage, transmission as well as the learning dynamics endemic to social movement building, action, outcomes and change. The course will emphasize learning as a unified composite of individual and collective human change in relation to socio-cultural and material perspectives primarily, the participatory structures of social movements as well as traditional changes in consciousness, skill and knowledge amongst participants. We will draw on both advanced theories of education/learning understood in the context of the long-established sociological sub-tradition known as ‘social movement studies’ and ‘social movement theory’. The course will take a critical approach to social movement studies introducing the inter-disciplinary history of social movement studies over the 20th century followed by reviews of canonical theories of political process and the polity model approach, resource mobilization, frame analysis, neo-frame analysis, contentious politics, dynamics of contention and contentious performances.  A significant proportion of the course will involve detailed secondary analysis of a specific social movement of the student’s choosing, and will demand regular research reports that are meant to serve as a resource for our collective learning as well as to support the production of individual final papers directly. The course is highly recommended to advanced masters as well as doctoral students. No prerequisites are required.

P. Sawchuk

WPL3931H    Advanced Studies in Workplace Learning and Social Change

This course will allow students to engage in advanced learning and research on the central national and international debates in the field. Students will develop extensive analytic and conceptual knowledge in the areas of the historical development of the notion of ''workplace learning'' and its links to diverse agendas of social change. The course will require the critical assessment and research applications of theories of workplace learning and social change, as well as practice and policy in the area. The course will include exploration of advanced case study research as well as national and international survey research, and encourage the linkages with students doctoral thesis work. Weekly seminars will be held.

P. Sawchuk

CIE1001H    Introduction to Comparative, International and Development Education

This course serves as the basic core course for the Institute's graduate studies concentration in comparative, international, and development education. It focuses upon the various theoretical conceptions of the socioeconomic development process and the role of formal and non-formal educational programs within that process. The basic purposes of the course are to introduce students to the comparative literature regarding education in advanced and developing nations, to evaluate the various ways in which comparative data may be used, and to examine the relative utility of various theoretical perspectives for understanding formal and non-formal educational policy problems common to many societies. CIDE students only or by permission of instructor.

Staff

CIE1002H    Practicum in Comparative, International and Development Education

Supervised experience in an organizational setting related to comparative, international, and development education, under the direction of a CIDE faculty and a professional mentor. The practicum will include not fewer than 40 hours of field placement over a period of one semester. There will be three assignments: 1) Development of a proposal that includes main learning goals, identification of a field site, and selection of a field based mentor; 2) Completion of the practicum itself (40 hours of on-sight work); 3) A final ''portfolio'' assignment that should include some combination of a short reflection paper on knowledge gained during the practicum, and evidence of any work completed during the practicum itself. The practicum is intended to provide students with practical experience and an opportunity to apply skills and knowledge gained from participation in the Comparative, International and Development Education Collaborative program. Arrangements for the practicum placement and selection of a CIDE supervisor are the responsibility of the individual student. The course will be open to students who have completed the core CIDE course, CIE1001H, and at least one other CIDE course.

NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL6797H are prohibited from taking this course.
Staff

CIE1005H    Special Topics in Comparative, International and Development Education

A course designed to permit the study (in a formal class setting) of specific areas of comparative, international and development education not already covered in the courses listed for the current year.

Staff

CIE1006H    Transnational Perspectives on Democracy, Human Rights and Democratic Education in an Era of Globalization

The course aims to: (i) explore national and Transnational Perspectives on Democracy, Human Rights and Democratic Education in an Era of Globalization drawing on experience and scholarship; (ii) provide opportunities for in depth engagement both with leading scholars acting as faculty and with students from other universities; and (iii) build global professional networks among students and faculty.

Students are expected to: (i) engage with key concepts relevant to democratic education such as: democracy, citizenship, human rights, antiracism, discrimination, equalities; (ii) interrogate transnational research and scholarship on Transnational Perspectives on Democracy, Human Rights and Democratic Education in an Era of Globalization, using a variety of perspectives including sociology, political science and pedagogy; (iii) critically evaluate and compare different national and international approaches to democratic citizenship education; (iv) apply understandings of democracy and human rights to educational contexts; and (v) develop and implement policies and programs for democratic education.

Based on a seminar mode, each school of education will suggest a number of faculty/professor as guest speakers in the area broadly defined as Transnational Perspectives on Democracy, Human Rights and Democratic Education in an Era of Globalization. From the pool of the professors, the U of T course director and collaborating faculty from of the other two institutions will select 3 to 4 guest speakers for the course on each offering. This course will be offered on-line to ensure synchronous delivery and participation of students across three different time zones: Toronto, London and Melbourne, each of the 12 sessions will take 2 hours only without break. Each guest speaker will be offering a brief lecture up to 15 minutes highlighting key issues around the topic of their scholarship. The rest of the class will be based on various forms of critical dialog and discussion (individual, group and whole class active learning activities). The speakers will also provide 2 to 3 readings (one from their publications and two from other scholars’ works), which will be distributed prior to the session and will be available on the online forum. Based on the primacy of dialogue, each topic/session is expected to ensure that the participants’ personal knowledge, the readings, and the instructors’ knowledge are brought into synthesized and integrated learning outcomes. Instructional variety (seminars, pair/group discussions, lectures, guest speakers, Video-recordings) and intellectual challenge are the key elements in the course’s pedagogy. In addition, reflection, cooperative learning, inclusive classroom ethos, critical thinking, social skills development, a culture of encouragement, and reciprocal sharing and learning are a must for each session.

Prerequisite: One page rationale submitted by MA & PhD students to instructor, justifying the course relevance to them prior to being enrolled in course.
Enrolment Limits: Open only to CIDE students with MA, PhD and EdD tracks.
Staff

Other courses accepted for credit in the Adult Education and Community Development Program

The following courses may be taken for credit in the Adult Education and Community Development Program.  For descriptions, see the relevant department course listings.

SJE1925H   Indigenous Knowledge and Decolonization: Pedagogical Implications
LHA1820H   Special Topics in Higher Education:  Master’s Level


Educational Leadership and Policy Program Courses
LHA1003H    Conducting Research in Educational Leadership and Policy [RM]

A seminar examining the strategies, techniques, and problems involved in the conduct of research in educational administration. This seminar prepares the student for defining research problems, reviewing relevant literature, writing research proposals, conducting research and writing reports in educational administration. During this course the student will prepare the proposal for their Major Research Paper.

NOTE: All master's candidates are strongly recommended to take this course towards the end of their program
J. Gaskell or Staff

LHA1004H    Research Literacy in Educational Leadership and Policy [RM]

The goals of this course are to provide students with an introduction to the purposes of research in educational leadership and policy and to assist students in learning how to obtain, evaluate, interpret, and use research in their work as educators and in their graduate studies. Possible topics include: overview of different research paradigms and research strategies used in studies of policy, leadership, and change; how to critically analyze the strengths and weakness of research; how to conduct a review of literature and build a bibliography; dissemination of research; the connections between research, policy, and practice; the role of research and evaluation departments; leadership roles in sponsoring, directing, using, and communicating research.

NOTE: All master's candidates are strongly recommended to take this course at the beginning of their programs
C. Campbell, A.K. Chmielewski or Staff

LHA1012H    Organizational Culture and Decision-Making

An analysis of the organizational culture of educational organizations. The implications for action resulting from research and theory relating to organizational culture are examined. Case studies and field experiences are used as bases for the analysis of decision-making within the context of specific organizational cultures.

Staff

LHA1016H    School Program Development and Implementation

An analysis of issues and problems in conceptualizing, operationalizing, and evaluating a total school environment in terms of a range of divergent goals and values. Major topics include strategies for program development and change in the context of education in Ontario, Canada, and internationally; theoretical and empirical bases differentiating educational environments, the role of the program manager, and skills needed to manage program development, organization, implementation, and evaluation.

S. Anderson

LHA1018H    Political Skill in the Education Arena

Practical considerations in solving political problems in and about schools. Focus is on the five levels of local governance: family/school, micro-politics (within the school), neighbourhood, meso-politics (the school and the central office), and the board. Special attention to understanding background variables such as the environment, institutions, power, and issues. Workshop activities centre around processes such as coalition-building, advocating, believing, and co-producing. Readings include procedural, fictional, and conceptual materials.

J. Ryan

LHA1019H    Diversity and the Ethics of Educational Administration

Administrators in education and teachers are continually asked to decide on matters of equity, to adjudicate between conflicting value positions, and to accommodate different rights and human interests in their planning. Often administrative practice in these areas is less than successful. This course will study various ethical schools of thought and modern approaches to social justice. It will apply that content to administrative practice in education. Particular attention will be given to equity issues in areas of race, culture, gender, age, social class, national origin, language, ancestry, sexual orientation, citizenship, and physical or mental abilities.

J. Portelli

LHA1020H    Teachers and Educational Change

This course deals with how teachers contribute to and are affected by administrative processes. It looks at the determinants of teachers' classroom strategies, the work culture of teachers, teachers' careers, the role of teachers in school decision-making, the relationship of teachers' educational commitments to aspects of their broader lives (such as age, religious and political beliefs, and gender identity), and the role of teachers in fostering or inhibiting educational change. The course will be of interest to elementary and secondary teachers and to educational administrators.

N. Bascia

LHA1024H    Critical Conversations: Philosophy, Educational Leadership and Educational Policy Studies

A philosophical inquiry of issues that arise in educational leadership and policy studies. Examples of issues include: Differing conceptions of administration and leadership; power and authority in education; the role of critical thinking; standards and diversity; bias in schools; censorship and controversial issues; the role of schooling in a pluralistic society; indoctrination and parental rights; common and separate schools. Case studies will be used to encourage students apply differing philosophical stances to practical situations.

J. Portelli

LHA1025H    School Effectiveness and School Improvement

This course examines the factors contributing to school effectiveness, including school climate and physical characteristics, instructional patterns, types of organization, and the use of time. It also considers the possibilities for school improvement in the context of a pluralist democracy and the use of total quality management (TQM) to improve educational institutions.

Staff

LHA1026H    Evaluation of Professional Personnel in Education

Issues surrounding performance evaluation of teachers and administrators in school systems will be examined. Topics include current practices in evaluation, evaluation policies and procedures, the legal context, the political dimensions, and related areas such as recruitment and selection of personnel. The conceptual background centres around a systems approach to personnel development. The thrust of the discussions, however, will be on practical problems in evaluation in schools within the Canadian setting.

Staff

LHA1029H    Special Applications of the Administrative Process

Some unique problems, presented to the administrator placed in special structures or environments, are examined with a view to developing appropriate applications of administrative processes. Depending upon resources of staff and needs of students electing this course, it will cover the administration of any one of, or combination of, the following: programs of special education, colleges and other institutions of higher education, large urban complexes, areas presenting special sociocultural problems, computer-assisted administration, and comparative educational administration.

A.K. Chmielewski, S. Davis, A. Lopez, or Staff

LHA1030H    The Legal Context of Education

An examination of the current context of legal discourse related to the practical exigencies of present-day school experience. A detailed study of statutory and common law sources under which educators operate. The law is not immutable. Emphasis on negligence, malpractice, human rights and the school system, teacher rights, and student discipline and the Young Offenders Act and Zero Tolerance.

M.A. Zuker

LHA1040H    Educational Leadership and Policy I: Introduction to Educational Administration: Policy, Leadership and Change

This course provides an introduction to educational policy, leadership and change in general and to this program in particular by focusing on foundational concepts and theories significant to the understanding of education and educational administration. It offers a critical examination of a wide range of topics central to educational administration, educational policy, leadership and change, such as organization, community, power, authority, change, difference, leadership, and values. This examination will take into account major historical developments in the field as well as differing theoretical stances or paradigms, such as positivism, functionalism, interpretivism, critical pedagogy, feminism, post-structuralism and post-modernism. The course will help students understand how to use theory to make sense of educational practice in productive ways.

NOTE: All master's candidates are strongly recommended to take LHA1040H as one of the first courses in their program.
C. Campbell, S. Davis, and Staff

LHA1041H    Educational Leadership and Policy II: Social and Policy Contexts of Schooling

This course will focus on the social and policy contexts in which elementary and secondary educators work. Students will be exposed to a variety of issues related to schooling in a diverse and complex environment such as: differing purposes, philosophies, and values of education; multiculturalism and social justice; equity issues related to race, class, gender, and language; parental influences on schooling; the relationship of schooling to the labor market and the economy; choice of school and program; decentralization and centralization; standards and accountability; educational finance; school reform; educational and non-educational pressure groups and stakeholders. Through an exploration of these or related topics, this course will help students to continue to develop their understanding of different paradigms and methods used in research in educational administration, leadership, policy and change.

NOTE: All master's candidates are strongly recommended to take LHA1041H as one of their first courses in their program.
J. Flessa, A. Lopez, R. Joshee, and Staff

LHA1042H    Educational Leadership and Cultural Diversity

This course is designed to acquaint students with the practices and issues associated with administration, organization, and leadership in educational organizations with culturally diverse student populations. Students will have the opportunity to critically analyse and appraise the practices and issues involved in the administration and leadership of such schools. They will also have the chance to probe and clarify their own conceptions of, and attitudes toward, multiethnic and anti-racist education generally and leadership in such school organizations specifically, in ways that will assist them with their own administrative practices.

J. Ryan

LHA1047H    Managing Changes in Classroom Practice

The course explores the meaning of classroom change from the teacher's perspective, addressing such issues as contemporary views of learning, the nature of teacher development, and the context of teaching. The perspective is then used to better appreciate how those in school leadership roles can facilitate efforts by teachers to improve their own practices, as well as meaningfully respond to out-of-school pressures for change.

S. Anderson

LHA1048H    Educational Leadership and School Improvement

A companion course to 1047. Contemporary conceptions of leadership are examined for their value in helping present schools improve and future schools serve their publics well. Understanding of expert leadership is developed through the study not only of expert leaders' behaviors, but also of their feelings, values, and problem-solving strategies. The formal and informal experiences that contribute to the development of leadership expertise will be examined.

Staff

LHA1050H    Themes and Issues in Change, Leadership, Policy, and Social Diversity

This course has been designed to be the final course for students in the 10-course M.Ed. Program in Educational Administration. The course provides an opportunity for students to explore and develop a comprehensive view of the field of educational administration, through a series of seminars designed to help summarize, integrate and consolidate knowledge of the field. Students will link particular problems in practice to the theoretical bases of the field, through the lenses of the major strands of our program: change, leadership, policy and social diversity. There will be a focus on analysis, synthesis and application, building a deeper understanding, situated in the broader field. The culmination of this course will be the creation of a comprehensive portfolio reflecting the student's understanding of the breadth and depth of the field.

J. Portelli, or Staff

LHA1052H    Individual Reading and Research in Educational Leadership and Policy: Master's Level

Specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing upon topics of particular interest to the student that are not included in available courses. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic.

Staff

LHA1060H    School Leadership Seminar 1

This course is the first of two courses to develop people to become school principals in Ontario. A key component of the course is the critical evaluation and focus on current research in the areas related to leadership practices and their effects, instructional leadership, education change and reform efforts. The course's content includes a critical awareness of current problems associated with educational leadership practice and application to current issues and problems in education informed by cutting-edge research and professional practice. The outcome of these courses is to hone the judgment of practitioners within the educational setting. Through the assignments students must demonstrate originality in the application of new knowledge and concepts.

NOTE: Enrolment restricted to students in OISE PQP 1.
C. Campbell

LHA1061H    School Leadership Seminar 2

This is the second of two courses which explores the role of the principal, one of the most influential roles in our educational system. It provides a foundation for candidates assuming the role of principal or vice-principal in Ontario schools and is one component of ongoing professional learning focused on the development of the personal and professional knowledge, and the skills and practices that lead to exemplary practice in the role of principal. The program is designed to support candidates in becoming reflective educational leaders who are informed consumers of education research in their ongoing professional growth, and who can lead effectively in the dynamic, diverse contexts of Ontario, characterized by rapidly changing events and circumstances.

NOTE: Enrolment restricted to students in OISE PQP 2.
J. Flessa and Staff

LHA3022H    The Investigation of School Culture: An Examination of the Daily Life of Schools

This course is intended to place the norms, values, and practices of school life within an administrative context. The focus is on factors that promote or inhibit the development of community and the achievement of educational purposes. Students are invited to explore and apply a variety of interpretive frameworks to their understanding of institutional culture.

J.J. Ryan

LHA3025H    Personal and Professional Values of Educational Leadership

This doctoral level course examines theories and frameworks which accommodate the influence of values, both personal and professional, on educational leadership practices. The primary focus is on values manifested by individuals and their impact on administrative problem solving processes. Value conflicts are explored particularly as they occur when the values of individuals clash with the broader social, collective or meta values associated with organizations.

Staff

LHA3029H    Special Topics in Educational Leadership and Policy

This course permits the study of specific topics or areas in educational administration not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session timetables.

J. Flessa, J. Gaskell, and Staff

LHA3030H    Advanced Legal Issues in Education

Understanding education law is essential to the effective management and operation of schools. Schools function in a complex legal environment. It is essential for educators to be as current as possible of their legal rights and responsibilities. Focus on current issues, legislative and common law precedents.

M. Zuker

LHA3037H    Strategic Planning in Educational Organizations

In this seminar, concepts of strategic planning will be explored in terms of processes, issues, and applications in the educational system. The role of strategic planning will be examined in terms of the organization's mission, its stakeholders, and its environment.

Staff

LHA3040H    Administrative Theory and Educational Problems I: People and Power in Organizations

A review of major perspectives on the individual and the organization includes discussion of questions pertaining to the nature of society and the nature of people. Of immediate concern is the manner in which decisions and organizational outcomes are produced, as well as the bearing that these sets of arrangements have upon productivity and the well-being of those whose lives are touched by organized education. Of express concern is the manner in which power is exercised in everyday situations that may involve elected officials, appointed administrators, teachers, students, and the public at large.

J. Flessa

LHA3041H    Administrative Theory and Educational Problems II: Doctoral Seminar on Policy Issues in Education

This seminar examines significant policy issues in education, both historical and current, both Canadian and international. Emphasis is on acquiring an understanding of the content and significance of the policies, with a secondary interest in policy analysis and development. Various faculty in the Educational Leadership and Policy Program will be responsible for particular sessions.

NOTE: Required for Ed.D. students. An elective suitable for Ph.D. students. Permission of course coordinator required for students outside Educational Administration
R. Joshee and Staff

LHA3042H    Field Research in Educational Leadership and Policy [RM]

The course explores naturalistic and ethnographic methods of research applied to field research and case studies in educational administration. The researcher as participant in as well as an observer of social reality; the relationship of fact and value in social research, the limits of science in truth-making; the relationship of such science-established truth to evaluation and administrative action; and the problems of ethical inquiry into organizational and administrative realities.

J. Ryan

LHA3043H    Survey Research in Educational Leadership and Policy [RM]

An exploration of the history and current use of survey research in educational leadership and policy. Topics will include an assessment of the strengths and limitations of the method survey, the selection of samples, questionnaire design, standard measurement instruments used in the field, methods of data analysis (with a focus on using SPSS), the drawing of causal inferences, and presentation of results in a clear and effective manner.

R. Childs and Staff

LHA3044H    Internship/Practicum in Educational Leadership and Policy

An advanced administrative experience, primarily for Ed.D. students, under the joint guidance of faculty members and senior administrators in the internship/practicum location. Placement and responsibilities relating to the internship/practicum are determined on an individual basis depending on the needs, interests, and aspirations of students and on the availability of appropriate locations.

Staff

LHA3045H    Educational Policy and Program Evaluation

This course provides a working understanding of the political processes of policy formation, implementation and consequences, as well as program evaluation processes and methods, interpretation, and utilization, emphasizing their role in educational practice and using specific educational issues, activities and actors to illustrate more broadly applicable concepts. The major project for the course will involve students' development of a piece of policy analysis or a program evaluation plan.

N. Bascia

LHA3047H    Research Seminar on Leadership and Educational Change

The course explores a variety of initiatives being taken to improve, reform, and/or restructure schools. The basic intents of these initiatives are examined in an effort to understand implications for productive change processes at the classroom, school, and school system levels. Emphasis is given to the role of leadership in fostering educational change. Students will be involved in a research project designed to illustrate the practical meaning of course concepts and to refine their research capacities.

C. Campbell

LHA3052H    Individual Reading and Research in Educational Leadership and Policy: Doctoral Level

Course description same as 1052H.

Staff

LHA3055H    Democratic Values, Student Engagement, and Democratic Leadership

An examination and application of democratic values to issues of student engagement and leadership. The course will explore the relationship between student engagement and critical-democratic leadership, and the implications that arise for educational administration and curriculum from the nature of this relationship. This course should be of interest to both teachers and administrators.

J. Portelli

LHA3145H    Advanced Issues in Educational Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation

This course, in conjunction with appropriate research methods coursework, provides doctoral students interested in policy analysis and program evaluation in education with a working understanding of the conceptual, methodological, ethical and political issues associated with these forms of research. Course topics include problem framing; use of existing research evidence; issues associated with different audiences and settings such as writing, presentation and evidence styles; policy advocacy; and working relationships with partners and clients. Visits by additional Collaborative Program-affiliated faculty from across OISE home programs will ensure that students are exposed to a range of contrasting research conventions and styles. Major assignments for the class will consist of carrying out some of the aspects of an applied research project.

N. Bascia

Other courses accepted for credit in the Educational Leadership and Policy Program

LHA2006H  Educational Finance and Economics


Higher Education Program Courses
LHA1802Y    Theory in Higher Education

This course surveys different theoretical approaches to the study of higher education and knowledge construction focussing on key authors in each tradition. Different theoretical perspectives in the higher education literature include the political economic, social psychological, critical (neomarxist, feminist, anti-racist, anti-colonial), and postmodern and poststructural, as well as writing based on scientific metaphors. Students will begin to identify the often unarticulated theoretical assumptions of writing in higher education, as well as to examine how theory is used by various writers and researchers in this field. The course is intended to assist students in choosing appropriate theoretical frameworks for their thesis or project research.

L. Muzzin

LHA1803H    Recurring Issues in Postsecondary Education

An examination of some of the many issues that have been characteristic of postsecondary education in the past and are likely to continue to be faced in the future.

Staff

LHA1804H    Issues in Medical/Health Professional Education

This course is intended to enable students to identify and analyze major current issues in medical/health professional education and to present clear, logically coherent and empirically justified analyses of those issues.

Staff

LHA1805H    The Community College

This course provides an overview of the history, philosophy and evolution of community colleges. While the focus will largely be on the Ontario college system, students will also engage in exploration of wider issues, controversies, challenges and opportunities that community colleges face more broadly in Canada, the United States and in other countries, particularly Anglophone countries with similar systems. The themes of social justice, access and equity run through all topics, as a key purpose of community colleges is to promote these objectives.

L. Wheelahan

LHA1806H    Systems of Higher Education

A comparative description and analysis of tertiary-level systems of education with special attention to their structure and governance and the relevant features of the societies in which they operate.

G.A. Jones

LHA1807H    Strategic and Long-Range Planning for Postsecondary Systems

This course is designed to provide students with basic knowledge and skills in strategic planning as applied to college and university systems. Past and current efforts at planning for universities and community colleges at the provincial level in Ontario will be analysed and compared with counterpart activities in other jurisdictions of Canada and the United States.

NOTE: This course with a systems focus complements LHA1811H, which has an institutional focus.
C.Sa

LHA1808H    Research in Health Professional Education [RM]

This course addresses educational research approaches specifically in the health professions. It involves a critical examination of appropriate literature with respect to survey, qualitative, and quantitative research methods with the objective of enabling students to propose implementable research projects.

NOTE: The course is designed for students enrolled in the M.Ed. specialization in health professional education
Staff

LHA1809H    Administration of Colleges and Universities

A study of the practice of management and administration in colleges and universities including: an examination of the processes of planning, organization, coordination, communication, control; decision-making practices; and the analysis of illustrative cases and present practices. The course will be organized mainly around case studies.

C.Sa

LHA1810H    Evaluation of Knowledge, Clinical Competence and Professional Behaviour in the Health Professions

This course is designed to acquaint health professionals with the assessment formats used to evaluate the domains of clinical competence in health care professional training at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels of training. The course will provide an introduction to the concepts of reliability and validity which are central to the analysis of the assessment methods to be discussed. Written examinations, oral formats, and Standardized Patient performance-based testing are amongst the methods that will be presented.

Staff

LHA1811H    Institutional Research and Planning [RM]

A study of the practice of institutional research and strategic planning in community colleges and universities. This course is designed to examine the methodologies and the practice of institutional research and to provide students with knowledge and skills in strategic and long-range planning as applied to colleges and universities at the institutional level.

NOTE: This course with an institutional focus complements LHA1807H, which has a systems focus.
Staff

LHA1812H    Education and the Professions

This course reviews theoretical debates regarding the nature of professions and professional education, placing them within their historical context in western societies. Contemporary issues that are addressed include the implications of globalization of the professions, diversity in the professions and the ''entrepreneural university'' and the professions. Perspectives of practitioners as well as faculty teaching in the professions are considered.

L. Muzzin

LHA1813H    Issues in Cognitive and Educational Psychology: Implications for Health Professional Education

This seminar course addresses a number of findings and theories in cognitive and educational psychology that are relevant to health professional education. Topics include theories of expert skills such as classification, problem solving, decision making, and technical expertise, as well as theories of expert development and their applications to health professional education. The course is designed around readings from the cognitive and educational psychology literature and relevant readings from the health professional education literature.

Staff

LHA1817H    Nurturing Professional Education

This course begins with the contemporary critique of professional education as ivory towerish, reductionist, exclusionary and monocultural and examines proposals for more practice-based, holistic, inclusionary and emancipatory approaches. Proposals for revitalizing professional education in the new millennium have emerged from a variety of theoretical orientations, including social psychological, critical, postcolonial and poststructural.

L. Muzzin

LHA1819H    Governance in Higher Education

This course addresses the arrangements for governance in higher education. It examines formal models and theories of governance; the legal and institutional framework of higher education governance; the role and characteristics of higher education intermediary bodies, governing boards, and academic senates and their relationships to one another; and current challenges and issues pertaining to university and community college governance.

G.A. Jones

LHA1820H    Special Topics in Higher Education: Master's Level

A course that will examine in depth a topic of particular relevance not already covered in regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session OISE course schedules.

Staff

LHA1821H    Institutional Differentiation in Postsecondary Education

This course will examine the nature of institutional differentiation in postsecondary education, theories which have been advanced to explain observed trends and patterns in institutional differentiation, and policy implications. Particular attention will be given to the following distinctions: degree and non-degree; public and private; comprehensive and special mission; education sector and non-education sector; traditional and nontraditional; and teaching centered and learning centered. The course will look also at comparative study of institutions as an analytical tool in the study of postsecondary education.

G.A. Jones

LHA1825H    Comparative Education Theory and Methodology [RM]

This course provides an overview of the evolution of comparative education as a field of study, covering historical-philosophical, positivistic, phenomenological and neo-Marxist approaches to the field. It also looks at how comparative education scholars have responded to the literature of postmodernism and globalization. Central themes of the course are the purpose of comparative education, the impact of diverse views of social change, and the idea of scientific method. The role of such international organizations as the International Bureau of Education, UNESCO, and the World Bank in comparative education is discussed.

R.E.S. Hayhoe

LHA1826H    Comparative Higher Education

This course provides an overview of the field of comparative higher education, beginning with perspectives from the different civilizations which fostered higher learning in the pre-modern era. It considers theories from comparative education and disciplines such as history, sociology and anthropology as they apply to understanding higher education in global context. It also takes both a regional and a thematic approach in looking at higher education across different societies. Themes covered in the course include gender in higher education, curricular patterns across different societies, student issues and the relation of higher education to the state.

R.E.S. Hayhoe

LHA1828H    Evaluation in Higher Education [RM]

The course examines models, methods, and concerns. Several levels of evaluation will be looked at (student learning; evaluation of instructor and course; program and institutional evaluation). Students will be required to write one short and one long paper and be encouraged to participate in class discussions. During class there will be practice in planning evaluations.

R. Childs

LHA1832H    East Asian Higher Education

This course examines traditions of scholarship and scholarly institutions in East Asia, relating them to such major religious and philosophical perspectives as Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism and Shintoism. Modern universities and higher education systems in China and Japan are analysed comparatively, as they drew upon Western models of the university, yet also incorporated aspects of their own traditions. Comparison with the higher education of other East Asian societies will also be encouraged. The course will enable students to grasp the main lines of difference between higher education in East Asia and the West, as well as differentiate some of the threads that have contributed to diversity within the region.

R.E.S. Hayhoe

LHA1833H    Academic Capitalism: Higher Education with a Corporate Agenda

Over the past twenty years research universities across many international jurisdictions have become increasingly entrepreneurial and aggressive in their pursuit of corporate relationships. This trend must be contextualized in terms of regional restructuring of higher education systems in an era of economic globalization. There is now abundant evidence that this trend influences many aspects of the university, including curricula, research, governance, and policy. In this course, students will be involved in critically examining the implications of academic capitalism, especially in terms of equity, human rights, and world environment issues.

L. Muzzin

LHA1834H    Qualitative Research in Higher Education [RM]

This course is designed for students who are planning, collecting data, analyzing or writing up thesis or other qualitative research. Classes will involve reading about the theoretical paradigms (e.g. interactionish, phenomenological, critical feminist, postcolonial/emancipatory) and research methodologies and types of analysis and interpretations being used by students (e.g. participant observation, thematic analysis, focus groups, individual interviews, ethnography, autoethnography, grounded theory, critical ethnography, participatory action research, life histories/narratives, institutional ethnography, textual analysis, policy or program analysis). Selected ethical issues that are often encountered in the process of doing research will also be covered. Special attention will be paid to analysis and interpretation of the data, with students presenting their changing views of their chosen topic for feedback and referral to relevant literature.

L. Muzzin

LHA1836H    Critical Analysis of Research in Higher Education [RM]

This course will focus on the critical analysis of interdisciplinary research conducted within the higher education context. Participants will begin with an exploration of the fundamental characteristics and underlying theories of quantitative, qualitative and mixed mode research methodologies, and the strengths and limitations of each in relation to issues relevant to higher education. Building on this foundation, the participants will analyze and critique publications and theses reporting higher education research. Recommendations and implications suggested in these documents will be critiqued with respect to their potential impact on decisions made by organizational leaders with respect to equity issues, policies and procedures. Finally, participants will develop a sound research proposal that could conceivably be conducted within the higher education context.

K. Janzen

LHA1837H    Environmental Health, Transformative Higher Education and Policy Change: Education Toward Social and Ecosystem Healing

In this course, environmental health is framed as a field of research, education, policy and advocacy endeavours that links the natural, health and social sciences with the worlds of the academy, community, business, economics, labour, governments and media. It includes physical, social, cultural, spiritual and societal relationships which are multidirectional and interlinked with the health and well being of all life. In the context of transformative higher education, the course will help students to develop critical thinking, investigative, analytical and practical skills to better understand the constraints of scientific certainty and uncertainty in today's complex world in order to address lifestyle as well as public policy changes. The issues are framed within the broad socioenvironmental perspectives on health promotion reflected in the goals of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion - strengthening community action, developing personal skills, creating supportive environments, helping in skills development to educate, enable, mediate and advocate. Readings will include selected works by Steingraber, Colborn, Hancock, Chu, Bertell, Davis, CELA/OCFPEHC, IJC, Van Esterik and Health Canada.

Staff

LHA1843H    Higher Education and the Law

This course will examine the legal framework of higher education, including laws, regulations, and judicial interpretations that impact upon the governance and conduct of higher education. Particular attention will be placed upon the tension between academic autonomy and individual rights as they affect students' rights, faculty status, sanctions against discrimination, and the conditions attached to government funding.

M.A. Zuker

LHA1844H    The Student Experience in Postsecondary Education

This course will explore the theoretical and conceptual foundations of the student experience in postsecondary education. As well, we will study the nature of work in postsecondary education that supports students' development and learning. Students in this course will review and discuss broad forms of literature/documentation that addresses various components of the student experience. A particular focus of this course will be on exploring the various outcomes of postsecondary education and examining forms of assessing the various student outcomes in and beyond postsecondary education.

S. Waterman

LHA1845H    Applications in the Student Experience [RM]

This course will provide students an opportunity to apply knowledge, reflections and skills developed in the Student Experience in Postsecondary Education course, ''The Student Experience in Postsecondary Education'', and their experiences working in areas related to student development and learning. Students will be required to construct and conduct a mini- research project; analyze data from the research project and design and lead a course module on a theory and research-to-practice aspect of student learning and development using the results from their research analyses. Portions of the course will follow the structure of Open Space Technology (Owen, 1997) which requires the co-creation of the course outline and approaches by students and the instructor.

S. Waterman

LHA1846H    Internationalization of Higher Education in a Comparative Perspective

The purpose of this course is to examine the complex phenomenon of internationalization from both conceptual and applied perspectives,. The course explores and develops a conceptual framework for internationalization through a rigorous analysis of different meanings of the concept; shifting rationales, benefits, risks, and outcomes; and the diversity of actors and stakeholders; Students will apply the conceptual framework to a region or group of countries in the world, by analyzing the key priorities, policies and issues. Comparing different approaches among the regions and countries will raise important questions about the different roles and implications of the internationalization process. Emerging trends and issues linked to internationalization including commercialization, brain drain/gain, quality assurance, cultural homogenization, neo-colonization and world rankings will be examined. This course has a definite policy orientation and students with some academic or professional background in higher education will benefit most from it.

Staff

LHA1847H    Human Resource and Diversity Issues in Higher Education

This course will explore and discuss models of and approaches to leadership as they pertain to higher education. Particular attention will be paid to equity and diversity issues within human resources, recognizing the increasing diversity of the higher education environment. The course will include an examination of (a) how equity and diversity inform our models of academic and administrative leadership; (b) what leaders might do to ensure that their institutions are viewed as Employers of Choice both nationally and internationally; (c) the role of leadership within the post secondary system in the promotion and enhancement of student learning and literature.

A. Hildyard

LHA1848H    Innovative Curricula in Higher Education and Professional Programs

This course explores how educators in higher education and professional programs approach curriculum development from an innovative perspective. Curriculum theories, philosophic perspectives in the literature, and current realities in the classroom will be explored. Curriculum challenges with respect to access, quality and funding in higher education will be identified and analyzed, and innovative strategies for addressing these challenges will be generated.

K. Janzen

LHA1850H    Quantitative Research Process and Design [RM]

This course is designed to help graduate students learn the fundamental concepts of quantitative research design. Students will evaluate research presented in the popular press and in scholarly journals. In addition to becoming a savvy consumer of research, students will learn the elements of a quantitative research study including: framing a research question, reviewing relevant literature, insuring internal and external validity, data analysis, presentation of results, and the ethical standards of conducting research.

Staff

LHA1851H    Survey Methodology [RM]

This course uses the concept of total survey error and total survey quality as frameworks to discuss the survey elements relative to representation, measurement and usefulness. These include appropriate sampling frames, various sample design strategies, data collection, the role of the interviewer, non-response and bias, the effect of question structure, wording and context, respondent behavior, post-survey processing, estimation in surveys, and stakeholder use. This course requires students to have completed a quantitative research or a statistics course prior to enrolling. 

R. Childs

LHA1852H    Individual Reading and Research in Higher Education: Master's Level

Individual Reading and Research courses are taken as specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing on topics of particular interest to the student that are not included in available courses. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic.

Staff

LHA1853H    Introduction to Student Services

This course is designed to introduce students to the field of student affairs and services within the context of Canadian postsecondary education institutions. We will use a multidisciplinary approach to examine the historical, philosophical, legal, and cultural foundations of student affairs and services work. From these multiple perspectives, we will discuss the guiding principles from which student affairs and services practitioners educate and deliver services and programs to students.

Staff

LHA1854H    Student Development Theory

This course examines the origins, present status, challenges and future directions of student development within the context of higher education in western society.  Sessions will review the evidence from research and practice that identify key factors influencing student development in postsecondary education.  Discussions will focus on the changing nature of students in higher education, the role of institutional policy, structure and function in facilitating student development and pathways to student success and retention.  In addition, the social, psychological and cultural foundations of the student personnel movement as well as the role and functions of student services staff in colleges and universities will be examined.

S. Waterman

LHA1855H    Capstone in Student Development and Student Services

This course will provide students in the Student Development and Student Services in Postsecondary Education field in the Higher Education M.Ed. to review and apply the lessons from courses taken in their Master’s degree program and in the their required core courses in their designated field.  The course will be presented as a seminar with extensive readings and discussions, faculty and guest presentations, student projects and a culminating project that demonstrates student ability to apply their cumulated knowledge of the field to an existing organizational challenge. 

Staff

LHA2006H    Educational Finance and Economics

The course is about the resources — public and private — that support schools, colleges, and universities: how the resources are raised, how they are allocated, how they are budgeted for, how they are economically justified, and how they are accounted for. The course is also about the connections: connections between investments in education and the larger economy, between the organization of systems and the way funding is allocated and accounted for, between forms of budgets and the efficiency with which funding is deployed, and between funding and educational quality. Although the ideas of classical economists – Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Becker, Rostow – about the formation of human capital will be discussed, the course does not require a background in economic theory.

NOTE: Students who have taken TPS1017H or TPS1841H are not eligible to take this course for credit.
D. W. Lang and Staff

LHA3810H    International Academic Relations

This course begins with the literature of international relations to set the context for an examination of higher education's role and responsibilities in an international arena. It then looks at the critical challenges to accepted views of knowledge in the university that have arisen from social theorists such as Habermas, from feminist scholarship, and from non-Western scholarship. Topics for exploration and research include the following: academic freedom in a global context; the role of universities and colleges in international development; relations between higher education institutions and international organizations; scholar/student exchanges; and human rights and higher education.

R.E.S. Hayhoe

LHA3820H    Special Topics in Higher Education: Doctoral Level

Course description same as LHA1820H.

Staff

LHA3852H    Individual Reading and Research in Higher Education: Doctoral Level

Course description same as LHA1852H.

Staff

Other courses accepted for credit in the Higher Education Program

(For descriptions, see relevant department course listings)

APD1207H   Counselling Topics in Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity/Diversity
APD1216H   Psychoeducational Assessment
LAW384H    Intellectual Property
LHA1107H   Developing and Leading High Performing Teams: Theory and Practice
LHA1114H   Comparative and International Perspectives in Adult Education
LHA1146H   Women, War and Learning
LHA1181H   Embodied Learning and Qi Gong
LHA3045H   Educational Policy and Program Evaluation
LHA3104H   Political Economy of Adult Education in Global Perspectives
LHA3140H   Post-Colonial Relations and Transformative Education
LHA3145H   Advanced Issues in Educational Policy Analysis and Program Evaluation
SOC6019H  The Sociology of Gender and Work

NOTE: In addition to Research Methods [RM] courses offered in Higher Education students may choose one of the following courses to fulfill their research methods requirement for the doctorate:

Educational Leadership and Policy:
LHA3043H   Survey Research in Educational Leadership and Policy [RM]

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning:
CTL1112H   Interpretive Research Methods in Holistic and Aesthetic Education
CTL1306H   Qualitative Research Methods in Education: Concepts and Methods [RM]
CTL1809H   Narrative and Story in Research and Professional Practice [RM]
CTL1810H   Qualitative Research in Curriculum and Teaching [RM]
CTL1861H   Critical Ethnography [RM]

Applied Psychology and Human Development:
APD1288H   Intermediate Statistics and Research Design [RM]
APD3201H   Qualitative Research Methods in Human Development and Applied Psychology [RM]

Social Justice Education:
SJE1905H   Qualitative Approaches to Sociological Research in Education [RM]
SJE3930H   Advanced Seminar on Feminist Methodology and Education [RM]

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto:
CHL5111H   Qualitative Research Methods
CHL5115H   Topics in Qualitative Research

Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto:
NUR1024H   Qualitative Research:  Foundations, Methods and Designs

Courses that fulfill the Health Professions’ Requirement for the MEd Program:
CHL5607H   Teaching and Learning by the Health Professions: Principles and Theories
LHA1173H   Creativity and Wellness:  Learning to Thrive
LHA1181H   Embodied Learning and Qi Gong
LHA1804H   Issues in Medical/Health Professional Education
LHA1808H   Research in Health Professional Education [RM]
LHA1810H   Evaluation of Knowledge, Clinical Competence and Professional Behaviour in the Health Professions
LHA1812H   Education and the Professions (can be used for regular or health requirement)
LHA1813H   Issues in Cognitive and Educational Psychology: Implications for Health Professional Education
LHA1817H   Nurturing Professional Education (can be used for regular or health requirement)
LHA1837H   Environmental Health, Transformative Higher Education and Policy Change:  Education Toward Social and Ecosystem Healing (can be used for regular or health requirement)


LHA1065H    Educational Equity and Excellence in International Comparison

In an era of expanding educational enrolments and attainment and rapidly growing world income inequality, equity and excellence of national education systems are seen as key routes to equality of opportunity, economic growth and competitiveness. This course will explore questions of how educational equity and excellence are defined and measured, how they are related to social and educational policies and whether they are competing or complementary goals. We will discuss a variety of theoretical and disciplinary perspectives from sociology, economics, psychology and education, and their views on status attainment and mobility, human capital, organization of the curriculum and opportunity to learn. Using this framework, we will review recent empirical evidence on macro-level patterns of educational equity and excellence across countries and over time and the role of educational institutions and social and welfare policies in shaping these patterns. Finally, we will examine the history, use and abuse of international data in educational policy-making, with particular emphasis on large-scale cross-national assessments and how particular countries gain prominence as world models of educational equity and/or excellence. The objective of the course is for students to become informed and critical consumers and users of international evidence in educational policy-making. Please note this is not a research methods course, and no statistical knowledge is required.

A.K. Chmielewski

LHA1108H    Adult Learning

This course is focused on empirical and theoretical research on the concept of adult learning. The course will operate on the basis of high student participation. Students are expected to incorporate aspects of their own experiences and/or research interests with course studies. From the vantage point of Adult Education, topic areas included in the course are as follows: the social importance of studying adult learning dynamics; history of conceptualizing adult learning; contemporary trends in studies of adult learning; agency, autonomy and the individual in adult learning research; socio-cultural theories of adult learning; the relationship of adult learning and social change; and, methods and methodologies in the study of adult learning.

Staff

LHA1142H    Young Adulthood in Crisis: Learning, Transitions and Activism

This course focuses on the experiences of a generation of young adults who have come of age under the auspices of fiscal crisis, austerity and massive shifts in social policies landscapes, and recent upheavals and mobilizations against the state across North and South America, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Young adults today are uniquely positioned within the cultural, economic, and policy landscapes of growing conditions of social and material insecurity. Compared to adolescence, which is a much-researched area of educational scholarship, young people who are “emerging” or “young” adults are an under-researched population. Emerging adulthood includes the period between 18 and 30 years of age when young people become more independent and explore various life possibilities. It is a time of profound change, when young adults acquire the skills and education they need for jobs and careers, when they establish households and relationships, begin families, and begin to contribute to society in meaningful ways. It is also a time in which young people gain political status vis-a-vis the state and become subject to rules and regulations concerning criminal justice and financial institutions and can experience an attenuating loss of social supports. There is a growing body of research to suggest that that the forms of ‘crisis’ experienced by young people today will have a profound effect on their transition to adulthood, their engagement in traditional social and political institutions, and their ability to participate ‘meaningful’ in the knowledge economy. For these reasons, emerging adulthood and youth studies are important areas of study in adult education.

Staff

LHA1144H    Queer Interventions: Tools for Community Organizing

This course presents a hands-on approach to community organizing on lgbtq issues, and is meant to supplement the skill base of those currently working in communities as health and social services professionals, as well as those who are grass roots community organizers. The curriculum is designed to engage lgbtq history and contemporary issues, and to integrate this knowledge with a skill-building approach to community development through organizing and participatory action.

Staff

LHA1149H    Precarity & Dispossession: Urban Poverty and Rebel Cities

Some of the most pressing problems affecting community wellness can be traced to how stable infrastructures are eroding, resulting in underemployment, insecure housing, expulsions from prime real estate, and criminalization of the racialized and indigenous poor. This course provides some important conceptual frameworks that help us understand how these themes are interconnected through militarized finance capitalism that is also alternatively referred to as ‘the new economy’, ‘casino economics’, and ‘crisis economics’. As devastating as these trends are, never have possibilities for transformation been more accessible through a myriad of inspiring social movements and innovative community activism and development. This course provides some critical literacy for organizing, and some hands-on experience in transformative community development.

Staff

LHA1849H    Faculty in Colleges and Universities

It has been argued that while much is known about research, teaching and governance in post-secondary education, little is known about the faculty who people these institutions. This course begins by examining issues of power visible in faculty careers with a particular focus on equity. Some of the topics that will be examined are labour relations, faculty-student relations, collegial arrangements, academic freedom, involvement in governance, knowledge production (research, publication, curriculum) and teaching and workload. The role of the intellectual from various theoretical perspectives will also be considered. 

L. Muzzin

LHA1856H    Advanced Student Development Theories in Higher Education

This course builds upon the knowledge gained in LHA1854, Student Development Theories in Higher Education. The course will more deeply examine psychosocial, cognitive structural, and typological theories. With a focus on intersectionality we will examine how race, culture, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, disability, and spirituality can influence development. Students will learn to use theories to improve our work with students. We will not do so without a critical examination of the theories.

Prerequisite: LHA 1854
Staff

LHA3048H    Introduction to Multiple Regression Analysis in Educational Research

This is an intermediate applied statistics course designed for students who have already taken one course in elementary concepts (e.g., sampling and statistical inference). The course covers the use, interpretation, and presentation of bivariate and multivariate linear regression models, curvilinear regression functions, dummy and categorical variables, and interactions; as well as model selection, assumptions, and diagnostics. Examples and assignments will draw from commonly-used large-scale educational datasets. Students are encouraged to use Stata; the course will also serve as an introduction to this software package (students may instead choose to use SPSS or other software they are familiar with). The objective of the course is to equip students with the skills to use, interpret and write about regression models in their own research.

Prerequisite: An introductory statistics course such as APD1287H or equivalent, or permission of instructor
A.K. Chmielewski