OISE/UT Graduate Course Descriptions

AEC1120 H

Organizations of every nature--manufacturing, service, hospitals, schools, governments--are being compelled to undergo rapid change, driven by increasing pressures to remain competitive and viable. Forces for change include globalization, mergers and acquisitions, and changing demographics/needs/values/expectations of workers, clients and the public. All who have been part of this process--managers, employees, consultants-- will undoubtedly attest to the frustrations and difficulties encountered. It is essential for those leading and facilitating change efforts to understand the dynamics involved and to be familiar with various change models and "proven paths". Many OISE graduates will find themselves in the position of some form of change agent. The course objectives are to: a) explore the dynamics of change; b) review strategies for taking advantage of facilitating factors and deal with obstacles; c) study 'change' models; d) examine the roles of leaders and facilitators; e) apply learning to actual situations in a field site. 'Change Management' Teams will be formed to conduct an analysis and develop a change strategy for an existing organization of their choice.


AEC1170 H

A course for experienced practitioners to learn to bring out, share, and apply their experienced knowledge of their practice. Students engage in exercises to identify their learning styles, their implicit theories, and their personal images. This knowledge is shared and applied in creative problem-solving groups.


AEC1201 H

Current theories and research on personality are reviewed from several perspectives, including psychoanalytic, interpersonal, humanistic, trait, psychobiological, operant, and social cognitive. Topics include personality development and consistency, personality change, conscious and unconscious functioning, aggression, learned helplessness, personality disorders, sex and gender issues, and cross-cultural personality theories. Major theoretical approaches to personality within the context of clinical counseling psychology. This will include philosophical assumptions, key concepts, the process of change, and applications. Designed for those interested in personality development, change, and treatment issues. Specific content relevant to diverse socio-cultural contexts has been included. Upon completion of this course students will be able to: Understand the development of various Western psychology personality theories; understand the issues relevant to personality theory and development in culturally diverse contexts; and articulate a critical understanding of one of the major theories presented in class.


AEC1229 H

Each year this course will examine a model of psychotherapy from among the following: Transactional Analysis, Gestalt, Psychodrama, Bioenergetic Analysis, and Family Therapy. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.


AEC1267 Y

A continuation of AEC203Y, designed primarily for M.Ed. students. Prerequisite: AEC1202H, AEC1203Y, and permission of instructor.


AEC1289 H

This course will examine community-based approaches to mental health. We will discuss a range of mental health issues from a community perspective including the unique approaches involved when working with disadvantaged groups, people of various cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, as well as ages, gender and sexual orientation. A critical perspective will be used to examine the extent to which current theory and research in the area of Community Psychology are useful in understanding a wide range of successful programs including health centres, shelters, and schools and how primary prevention can be used effectively.


AEC3113 H

This course will offer a critical framework for analyzing the role of modern Western democratic states in initiating, implementing, and ensuring equality of access and participation to members of marginalized groups. It examines the potential and limitations of public policy in areas such as, but not limited to, education, health, social and legal services, housing, and anti-racism.


AEC3126 H

This course considers those conditions operating in our contemporary world that are enhancing or are fragmenting the development of a "world community." Special attention will be given to the problems presented by nation states - that is, violence as a resolution to social conflicts within and between nation states. The mass media and educational institutions will be examined as contributing factors to state violence and the attendant fragmentation of efforts of community mobilization toward a global world community. A strong emphasis on global-ecology issues will be pervasive.


AEC3138 H

This seminar examines adult education policies, programs and practices in the light of theories of social and cultural reproduction, as well as theories of social change. It also provides students with an opportunity to critically analyze both existing theories and their own assumptions. One of the goals of the seminar is to assist students with developing their theoretical framework for their thesis. Thus, students will be asked to take an active role in relating social theories to their research proposal.


AEC3173 H

Theory and practice in visualizing and initiating change in educational, community and work settings with special emphasis on fostering resiliency and wellness. Preventive models of service delivery based on collaborative problem solving approaches; dynamics of consultant and consultee relationships. Analysis of practicum experiences in educational or other contexts of students' choice. Prerequisite: AEC1173 or permission of instructor.


AEC3176 H

The course is intended to extend students' previous explorations of both "practitioner and ecological identity" through extensive readings, discussions and writing opportunities. It is directed to a wide range of professionals/practitioners (including those working in environmental education). These persons see potential places in their work contexts and lives, and their professional practices, for the clarification and expression of personal values grounded in ecological and environmental experience, knowledge, and responsibility. The course provides a context in which to examine a variety of published works by scholarly and literary authors, journalists, artists and those in the professions. These works articulate notions of "sense of place", "rootedness" in landscape (intellectual, professional, built, and natural), ecological/environmental identity, geopiety, and a range of other connected concepts and will form the basis for extending course participants' understandings and expressions of their own ecological/environmental identities and perspectives as they pertain to professional practice within their workplaces. The course is intended as an extension and expansion of AEC1178. Permission of instructor is required.


AEC3179 H

This course will focus on the ways in which technology structures work processes within the context of recent shifts towards the "knowledge economy". We will explore the nature of the knowledge economy, the position of knowledge workers, and the lengths between knowledge work and technology. This will allow us to assess the impact of technology on inequality, both locally and globally. The debates on technology and knowledge work will be explored in relation to issues such as the proliferation of internet spaces, educational technologies, transnationalism and cyberactivisms. Throughout the course we will study the racialized and gendered nature of technology, knowledge and work.


AEC3211 H

The course is intended for students who plan to conduct research in the fields of counselling or health promotion. Published research in these two domains will be reviewed, including treatment outcome and program evaluation, gender and diversity issues in counselling and health promotion. Students will be encouraged to consider their life experiences, values and worldviews in constructing their research plan.


AEC3234 Y

This course will familiarize students with current issues in multicultural studies. Particular emphasis will be given to understanding the rhetoric of quantitative and qualitative research. The course is appropriate for students considering a dissertation proposal in intercultural studies as well as for students wishing to become knowledgeable in this area. A weekly seminar will focus on design and methodology in multicultural research. Students are required to demonstrate mastery of at least one area of research related to multicultural studies. They will review, analyse, and redesign representative studies in the multicultural literature. It is expected that for many students the review and research design will lead to the development of thesis proposals.


AEC3267 H

This course is designed to increase students' theoretical knowledge, conceptual understanding and competencies in clinical supervision. In addition to class work, students will act as trainee supervisors with Counselling Psychology faculty who are teaching the Master's Practicum Course AEC1203Y or with psychologists in the field who are acting as Internship Supervisors in one of our field settings. Students will have the opportunity to discuss research and theoretical issues, develop practical skills relevant to supervision, develop a personal supervision approach, and understand the professional supervisory role and the ethical issues pertaining to supervision. Note: For doctoral students in Counselling Psychology only.


APD1200 H

All students of human development are interested in two questions: What develops? What influences development? In this course we are also interested in a third question: What is the role of formal education in human development? This course will provide an opportunity for students to construct an overall perspective on development and education, and to be introduced to the main areas of expertise among the faculty.


APD1201 H

This course addresses issues and developmental changes in children and the factors involved in child development. Infancy, the preschool period, early school years, intermediate years, and adolescence are covered. Clinical and/or educational issues may be covered in some sections of this course.


APD1202 H

An appraisal of a number of basic theories of counselling and approaches to inducing client change. Full-time Guidance and Counselling students may take AEC1202H concurrently with AEC1203Y. Counselling students will have priority for enrolment in this course.


APD1203 Y

This course is intended to provide students with basic skills in clinical assessment and counselling interventions. Among others, issues related to the assessment of risk, history taking, clinical formulation, and the relationship between assessment and intervention will be addressed. Basic counselling interventions such as empathic responding, exploration of client's affect and cognitions, and problem solving will be explored. The course emphasizes the therapeutic relationship as well as the importance of ethical and legal issues in the provision of therapy. While the course presents didactic material, students have extensive opportunity to role play, and self-knowledge as well as issues related to boundary maintenance, power relationships in the provision of therapy and future self-development are also examined. This course involves sequenced skill training, with extensive counselling simulation and supervision of practice in a field setting. In addition to regular class meetings and time spent in group supervision with the instructor, M.Ed. students in Counselling are required to be in attendance one full day per week at their practicum settings. Some students may spend two full days in their practicum setting. MA students are required to be in attendance at least 2 full days per week at their practicum settings. All full- and part-time students must arrange their practica in consultation with the department's Coordinator of Internship and Counselling Services. Continuing students should plan to contact the Coordinator by March 15, and new students by May 15, in order to arrange the best match between student needs and field placement availability. The Counselling committee reserves the right to make any final decisions when questions arise concerning the placement of a student in a setting. Note: Part-time students must be available one full week-day per week to fulfill the practicum requirement. Note: All counselling practica must be done through OISE. Practica done at other universities may not be considered as substitutes. Prerequisite: AEC1202H, for Counselling students only. Full-time Counselling students may take AEC1203Y concurrently with AEC1202H.

APD1204 Personality Theories

Current theories and research on personality are reviewed from several perspectives, including psychoanalytic, interpersonal, humanistic, trait, psychobiological, operant, and social cognitive. Topics include personality development and consistency, personality change, conscious and unconscious functioning, aggression, learned helplessness, personality disorders, sex and gender issues, and cross-cultural personality theories. Major theoretical approaches to personality within the context of clinical counseling psychology. This will include philosophical assumptions, key concepts, the process of change, and applications. Designed for those interested in personality development, change, and treatment issues. Specific content relevant to diverse socio- cultural contexts has been included. Upon completion of this course students will be able to: Understand the development of various Western psychology personality theories; understand the issues relevant to personality theory and development in culturally diverse contexts; and articulate a critical understanding of one of the major theories presented in class.


APD1205 H

This course provides students with an overview of legal, ethical, and professional issues as they relate to the practice of psychology. The current regulatory model of psychology in Ontario and its implications for practice are reviewed. The Canadian Code of Ethics, College of Psychologists' Standards of Professional Conduct, federal and provincial legislation, and case law that apply to practice in Ontario are reviewed as they relate to issues of confidentiality, record keeping, consent, competence, professional boundaries, and diversity issues in assessment, psychotherapy, and research. Throughout the course, a model of ethical decision-making designed to assist practitioners with ethical dilemmas is reviewed and practiced with a variety of case examples in the context of small- and large-group discussion.


APD1207 H

This course will review the research findings and clinical case literature in selected areas of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender psychology with reference to their implications for professional practice in counselling psychology. Particular emphasis will be given to the clinical and research implications of sexual orientation identity acquisition, bias crime victimization, same sex domestic violence, HIV/AIDS, gender dysphoria, and alcohol and substance use. Students will come to a greater appreciation and understanding of the special counselling needs of clients from differing sexual orientations and gender identities through a combination of lectures, seminar presentations, discussions, bibliographic and Internet research, and original student research projects.


APD1208 H

This course serves as an introduction and orientation to issues in psychological assessment. The principles of appropriate and ethical testing are reviewed with emphasis on psychometric theory, test standards, multicultural competence, and communication of findings. Supervised practical experience is provided in the administration and interpretation of representative tests of intellectual achievement, personality, neuropsychological, and occupational functioning to adults. Limited to Counselling Psychology for Psychology


APD1209 H

This course reviews foundational skills necessary for the successful completion of the MA thesis. The primary goals will be to develop: the ability to draw valid conclusions from quantitative evidence; the ability to critique published research articles; the ability to conduct a well designed piece of research; the ability to write up that research in a format appropriate for a journal article or thesis. The course deals with research methods, the conceptual foundations of statistics, and the preparation of a thesis/research report. The aim is to try to integrate these three things (research methods, the interpretation of statistics, and thesis/journal


APD1211 H

This course examines research on the psychological foundations of early childhood and relates those foundations to practice in the preschool and primary years. Early education is considered in relation to program factors such as teachers' beliefs and curriculum areas, to child and family factors such as temperament and attachment, and to social factors such as childcare experience and community. Young children's physical, cognitive, communicative, social and emotional development are explored as contributors to and as consequences of early learning experiences.


APD1214 H

The course is designed to introduce students to the field of counselling in the context of a multi-cultural, multi- ethnic, multi-faith, multi-racial, multi-gendered and multi-abled society. The course seeks to define and locate multicultural counselling studies within the broader historical, economic, social and political contexts of mental health care. Through a critical examination of 'race', gender , ethnicity, sexual orientations, disability and social class students would establish an understanding of the theoretical and conceptual ideas that form the basis of practice with minority clients. Key concepts such as identity and multiple identities, power, stereotyping, discrimination, prejudice and oppression will be explored in relation to women, Aboriginal, ethnic minorities, lesbian, gay men and disabled clients. Through discussions, seminar presentations and experiential learning, the course will support the development of appropriate counselling skills and competencies to practice in a clinically anti-oppressive way. Prerequisite is AEC1202; and co-requisite is AEC1203Y


APD1215 H

The purpose of this course is to gain an understanding of basic principles of psychological assessment and to acquire administration skills with respect to several widely used standardized tests of intelligence, academic achievement, and special abilities. Topics will include the history of intelligence testing, contextual issues surrounding the assessment process, basic statistical concepts related to psychometrics, test administration, and report writing. Students gain practical experience with respect to a test administration and scoring of a number of tests (e.g., WISC-IV, WPPSI-III, WAIS-III, WIAT-II, K-TEA, WJ-III, WRAT-3) which are evaluated through review of completed test protocols and videotaped test administrations. Pre-requisite: This course is limited to students in the School and Clinical Child Psychology program and is a pre-requisite for course HDP 1216.


APD1216 H

Theory and practicum in psychological assessment techniques applied in school settings. Administration and interpretation of individual intelligence tests, academic tests, tests of special abilities and behaviour rating scales within the context of a practicum assignment in the Counselling and Psychoeducational Clinic. Topics focus on the development of assessment plans, clinical interviewing, test interpretation, report writing, feedback, and consultation. Prerequisite: This course is limited to students in the School and Clinical Child Psychology program who have completed course HDP1215.


APD1217 H

This course provides a basic overview of current behavioural and cognitive-behavioural approaches to the management and remediation of maladaptive behaviour, such as aggression, disruption, and noncompliance, in clinical, educational and residential settings. A conceptual model of behaviour and cognitive-behaviour therapy and learning principles relevant to this model will be considered. The model focuses on proactive, nonintrusive, and success-based approaches to remediation of problem behaviour. Topics will include assessment of maintaining variables, teaching of adaptive skill clusters, building tolerance to difficult environmental circumstances, moderating severe behaviour to enable skill-teaching, and evaluating clinical


APD1218 H

This course supports and monitors the development of the M.A. student's clinical skills, (assessment and intervention) in the field placement. Placements are typically in school settings. Seminars are scheduled on alternate weeks for the academic year. They focus on issues related to differential diagnosis and clinical practice. Note: Open to School and Clinical Child Psychology students only, and ordinarily taken in the second M.A. year. Students are expected to consult with Dr. Link to arrange a practicum placement. Pre-requisite: HDP1215, HDP1216, HDP1219, HDP1220 or equivalent; and permission of instructor.


APD1219 H

This course is an introduction to ethical issues in the professional practice of psychology. We will cover issues encountered in counselling, assessment, and research and will have opportunities to discuss ethical issues in teaching and organizational and community psychology. The goals of the course are: a) to familiarize students with the variety of issues they might encounter in their own work, b) to provide students with the skills and resources for ethical decision-making, c) to familiarize students with the codes, standards, and legislation which bear on ethical and legal issues. Open to Counselling Psychology students only.


APD1219 H

This course provides students with an overview of legal, ethical, and professional issues as they relate to the practice of psychology. The current regulatory model of psychology in Ontario and its implications for practice are reviewed. The Canadian Code of Ethics, College of Psychologists' Standards of Professional Conduct, federal and provincial legislation, and case law that apply to practice in Ontario are reviewed as they relate to issues of confidentiality, record keeping, consent, competence, professional boundaries, and diversity issues in assessment, psychotherapy, and research. Throughout the course, a model of ethical decision-making designed to assist practitioners with ethical dilemmas is reviewed and practised with a variety of case examples in the context of small- and large-group discussion.


APD1220 H

This course is intended to provide students in School and Clinical Child Psychology with a grounding in the conceptual foundations of the program. The implications of the scientist practitioner model for practice as a school or clinical child psychologist is the cornerstone of the course. Specific issues to be addressed include developmental and systemic approaches to psychological practice, systems and group behavior within, and related to the school organization, multidisciplinary teams, approaches to consultation, principles of prevention and intervention, and program evaluation. Students will apply the principles discussed in the course in a practicum placement arranged by the course instructor. Note: Open to School and Clinical Child Psychology students only, and ordinarily taken in the first MA year.


APD1228 H

This course will examine one of several contemporary models of psychotherapy for family and couples counselling.


APD1234 H

This course examines the psychological and philosophical basis of cognitive science including such topics as the nature of mental representations, functionalist and computational theories of mind, intentionality, subjectivity, consciousness, and meta-cognition.


APD1236 H

The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of child and adult psychopathology. In order to do this we will look at normative patterns in personality, behavior and emotions. We will treat the work in the epidemiology of childhood and adult disorders as central to our understanding of these disorders, and discuss the methodological issues involved in this type of approach that make it so useful to understanding etiology, course, treatment and prognosis. The diversity of functioning in the emotional and behavioral realm will be reviewed in order to understand issues of abnormal or pathological development. The way in which the social and cultural context interacts with genetic and constitutional aspects of the individual will also be considered. This will give us the basis for examining some of the most common disorders and understanding the dynamics of these disorders during childhood and into adulthood. Note: Open to MA and PhD students in SCCP and DPE. Others by permission of the instructor.


APD1237 H

This course will cover theories and models of development that are relevant to how people learn. Research in cognitive science that has contributed to our understanding of learning will be reviewed and discussed, and student projects will help consolidate and extend these ideas. The course also examines motivation to learn, the development of higher order thinking, and communities of learning, both in terms of social and cultural


APD1238 H

This course examines current literature on evidence-based practice in the screening, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and education of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Emphasis is placed on the medical and social model of disability and the impact of autism spectrum disorders on child and adolescent development, family functioning, and service delivery in clinical and educational settings.


APD1238 H

Proposals for educational reform both ancient and modern are premised on assumptions about society, about knowledge and about learners. This course will review some of the proposals for reform including the liberalization of the curriculum, the raising of standards, the accommodation to diversity, the drive to accountability and ask 1) why they routinely fail, 2) what they tell us about society, schools and persons, 3) how to make a theory that would be relevant to educational policy decisions.


APD1238 H

An exploration of contemporary scientific evidence, social policy, and educational/clinical practice pertaining to early child development. This course will incorporate the Millennium Dialogue on Early Child Development, to be held November 7 - 9 at the University of Toronto, a forum for international experts participating in a webcast dialogue that aims to have global influence. (Participating scientists include Ron Barr, Tom Boyce, Megan Gunnar, Dan Keating, Alicia Lieberman, Charles Nelson, Michael Rutter, and Richard Tremblay. For more details, visit www.webforum2001.net). Topics include brain development, emotional development, family and community impacts on children, competence and coping, and societal and cultural issues. Participants in this course will consider how contemporary developmental research findings can inform and promote optimal child development, and will participate in the dialogue itself by generating critiques and topics for discussion by participating scientists.


APD1238 H

Computer based 'telelearning' has the potential to be a revolutionary new medium for educating children for the information society of the 21st century. A number of large scale research projects have recently been undertaken in an attempt to keep Canada in the forefront of the development of this technology. These projects are identifying and developing the tools needed to realize the potential of the new information technology in the classroom. This new technology is especially important for teachers who are working with special needs learners either in integrated classroom settings or in a resource capacity. One of the large scale projects - The Special Needs Opportunity Window or 'SNOW' project - is focusing precisely on this area. This course is offered in conjunction with that project. The students will work with classroom teachers and their resource support from collaborating boards to identify, develop and field test appropriate telelearning strategies that meet the needs of students and their teachers in integrated classrooms. The course is open to any OISE/UT students who are interested in applying the new telelearning technology in the classroom. It is anticipated that several of the Board partners of the SNOW project will also participate in the course. Therefore, the students will be able to work with the technology in actual classroom situations. The course will involve both face-to-face interaction as well as electronic interaction using various state-of-the-art telelearning tools. The learning environment will emphasize collaborative knowledge construction.


APD1238 H

In this course, students will examine the nature and development of verbal self direction and expertise, conditions fostering and inhibiting this development, and features of educational programs which create these conditions. Students will participate in the assessment of self-directive processes and expertise, and the design of educational programs which foster self directive development.


APD1238 H




APD1238 H

This will be a graduate level seminar that will address fundamental questions regarding symbolic development and media-based learning in young children. We will explore recent findings in relation to questions such as the following: (2)What does symbolic understanding entail? (3) What is the developmental trajectory with respect to symbolic understanding? (4) What social-cognitive processes underlie symbolic development? (2) What can young children learn from media? (3) How well can young children learn from media? (4) What features of the media affect learning? (5) How can we facilitate children’s symbolic learning? We will explore these questions by examining children’s learning from a variety of symbolic media: pictures, scale- models, maps, TV, and electronic games.


APD1238 H

An examination of students' classroom discourse with an emphasis on how ideas are jointly constructed and new learning or knowledge established. Epistemological theories and empirical classroom discourse studies are addressed. Major topics include: joint construction of meaning, peer interaction and learning, knowledge as object, creating a collaborative learning community, and the development of children's explanatory theories.


APD1238 H

This course uses different theoretical perspectives to examine the literacy development of urban students who are at risk of dropping out psychologically or physically from the school context. Attention is given to institutional, community, family, and individual challenges that may influence access to literacy development and may prevent learning from texts in schools. The course considers programs and instruction that respond to these different perspectives and that foster reading and writing development across the grades.


APD1238 H

In this course students will explore basic requirements and issues related to preparing and writing articles for publication in education journals. The course includes reading a number of articles in the field and discussing such matters as content, structure and argument, and theoretical and practical research issues. Each student will produce on their own a paper which will be reviewed and discussed by the group as a whole. The overall goal is to provide each student with the opportunity to develop an article suitable for publication.


APD1238 H

This course focuses on the phenomenon of inattention in the classroom, its detrimental impact on learning and academic outcomes, and on evidence-based intervention to improve students' attention. It will examine the psychological constructs of attention and inattention from both behavioural and cognitive perspectives, the typical and atypical development trajectory of attention skills, and the manifestation of inattention in children with various special needs recognized by the Ontario Ministry of Education. Evidence is presented for the detrimental effects of inattention on the development of numeracy and literacy skillls, as well its associated risk for poor adult outcomes. Students will learn assessment methodologies as well as evidenced-based intervention approaches for individual students, small groups, inclusive classrooms, and special education


APD1238 H

This course provides an overview of language acquisition from birth to adolescence and an overview of literacy development from preschool/kindergarten years to adolescence. Topics covered include speech perception, phonology, morphology, syntax, vocabulary, aspects of metalinguistic awareness, word reading, and reading comprehension. Issues related to bilingualism and biliteracy are also discussed when relevant.


APD1238 H

How does a newborn baby that is almost entirely focussed on basic bodily functions such as sleeping and feeding become transformed in the space of a few years into the sophisticated social consumer of information that is ready for school? This course will follow the milestones of early social and cognitive development. The overarching goal is an understanding of how cognition, language and social behaviour are intertwined in the developmental process. Key topics will include: adaptations for social life; social engagement in the first year; joint attention and learning through others; the nature of mental representation; varieties of self knowledge; reasoning about the future.


APD1238 H

Current research suggests that approximately 15-20% of Canadian children and youth suffer from mental health issues (e.g., anxiety, depression). Mental health problems in students are often related to systemic factors, such as parents' mental health, poverty, minority status, and/or geographic factors (e.g., lack of resources in northern isolated regions of Canada). Despite findings that mental health problems in students are common, schools often overlook the impact these issues have on students’ academic success. Educators have an opportunity to play a vital role in the lives of all students. By learning about the signs of mental health problems and by understanding how to refer students suffering from mental health problems to appropriate services, educators can open the door to effective assessment and intervention services. This course explores the prevalence and types of mental health problems in Canadian students. One of the course’s foci will be exploring the impact specific mental health issues (e.g., mood disorders; attachment problems; trauma) have on the academic lives of students. Goals for this course will be to examine the relationship between mental health issues, poverty, minority status, and geographic factors; to explore how the education system has addressed mental health issues in students throughout history; to outline how educators can learn to recognize signs of mental health problems in students; and to learn how schools can collaborate effectively with other systems (e.g., CAS; mental health agencies) when referring students for services and when implementing appropriate interventions.


APD1238 H

This course will involve an exploration of illiteracy and its role in the marginalization of youth and young adults. The course will consider what is known about: youth marginalization, the causes of reading/writing difficulties, the pervasive impact of illiteracy, and the evidence concerning effective interventions for breaking the cycle of failure related to illiteracy. A comprehensive examination will be undertaken of the factors that place children and youth at risk for literacy failure, including cognitive/linguistic, social/emotional, and contextual factors (school, home and community).


APD1238 H

The purpose of this course is to examine from a cross-cultural perspective topics such as problems in child development, parenting, beliefs and attributions of physical and mental illness, notions of learning problems, and the function of various helping professions. Through readings and classroom discussion the course is intended to help students become aware of alternative frameworks and the ways in which such differences may affect the interpretation and efficacy associated with typical Western intervention modes.


APD1238 H

This course will introduce students to young children's epistemological understandings of the written language, prior to schooling. Children's early experiences in reading and writing will be explored in relation to developmental, social and cultural factors. Associations among literacy, language development and cognition will be explored. Students will have the opportunity to conduct small empirical investigations in an area of early literacy development.


APD1238 H

In this course, students will develop an understanding of how and why different Forms of bullying (physical, indirect, cyber) compromise the safety of children in Elementary classrooms. We will also do an in depth exploration of contemporary Practice for bullying prevention and intervention. Students will learn strategies For effective collaboration and consultation with families and for intervening directly With bullies, the bullied, and bystanders. By the end of the course, students should Be able to recognize the early indicators of safe and unsafe classrooms and be Ready to implement effective classroom models for bullying prevention.


APD1238 H

IThis course explores common and significant at-risk behaviours among today’s youth. Potential topics include current trends in substance use and addiction, underachievement, eating disorders, self-injury and suicidality, anxiety and depression, sexual and/or gender identity development, violence and bullying, and grief/loss/trauma. Content will focus on signs and symptoms, as well as prevention and intervention strategies for educators.


APD1238 H




APD1238 H

This course will cover growing points in cognitive science, including perception of objects, planning and intention, problem solving and creativity, distributed cognition, emotions, cognitive poetics.


APD1238 H

Governments across Canada have recently implemented or are contemplating new polices that will have substantial impacts on the way children grow up. Examples include extended and better compensated maternity leaves, universal childcare, full day junior and senior kindergarten, class sizes limits, new vaccinations. This multidisciplinary course introduces students to some of the research that underlies these initiatives. Each week a faculty member drawn from various disciplines within the social sciences, public health and education at the University will present their current research in this area. In selected weeks guest researchers from other institutions will make presentations. The topics covered will follow the current research of these participants. For students the objective is to gain an appreciation of the connection between research and policy. Most public policies for children draw on a research base. However, research in a given area is sometimes inconclusive and seldom unanimous in recommendation. Furthermore, policies typically integrate any results of research with the claims of various stakeholders in the policy and political processes. A policy maker, therefore, must be able to understand the sometime conflicting claims of researchers and be able to translate them into coherent policy recommendations. A final goal of this course is to provide students with a basis for considering children’s policies from a multidisciplinary perspective.


APD1238 H

This course is intended to present and discuss new theoretical, empirical, and methodological approaches to the psychology of language, literacy, and culture. Various explanations of the cognitive, social, and cultural consequences of spoken and written language will be outlined and confronted. A second focus will be the relationships between diverse forms and modes of language (such as oral, written, signed, electronically mediated) and their cognitive and cultural implications.


APD1238 H

The course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of current developmental research on infants' and children's cognition. We will explore children’s understanding of physical (inanimate) objects, psychological kinds (people), and symbols. You should expect to gain an understanding of some of the main theoretical questions underlying current developmental research and the methods used to address these questions. We will begin with a review of the major theoretical perspectives on cognitive development, spanning from Piaget's theory, to sociocultural theory, to current neuroscience approaches. We will then survey children’s development in several core domains.


APD1238 H

The course will focus on the assessment and intervention of children who have experienced severe abuse and neglect. Short and long term effects including physiological, physical and psychological, as well as various intervention modalities will be discussed.


APD1238 H

This course examines psychological theories of play (e.g. Vygotsky, Parten, Huiainga, Brown) and the role of technology in play (e.g. Resnick, Gee, Squires) from both human development and educational perspectives. Topics addressing play include: neurological development, healthy mental development, trust, collaboration and passion to learn. In addition, we will address the growing role of technology in 'eduplay' and emerging social implications within special education and early learning (e.g. concerns of addiction to gaming, social media, and networked connectedness). 1. What is flex-mode? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tVBn4vGkSI 2. The discourse environment http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ys2Hm0F7xHE (10 minutes) 3. The Webinar Explained http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsDaPyGQNW4 (4 minutes)


APD1238 H

This course examines current literature on evidence-based practice in the screening, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and education of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders. Emphasis is placed on the medical and social model of disability and the impact of autism spectrum disorders on child and adolescent development, family functioning, and service delivery in clinical and educational settings.


APD1238 H

Narrative has become an extensively discussed subject in a number of psychological research fields ranging from consciousness, cognition, and emotion to applied areas such as clinical, educational, and cross-cultural psychology. This course will examine the importance of narrative for a dimension that affects most of these areas: human development and identity. The purpose of the course is to make participants familiar with theoretical, empirical, and methodological concepts and models that aim to understand the nature of narrative in processes of (linguistic, cognitive, social, and moral) development, using the development of self and identity as an integrative focus. .


APD1238 H

Through discussion of research findings, clinical observations, and case studies, this course will focus on issues such as "normal" child and adolescent sexual development, the causes and consequences of adolescent sexual aggression, offender-specific assessment, risk prediction, therapist self-care, and legal/ethical issues and dilemmas. We will also examine current practices and outcome research regarding the treatment of adolescent and adult sexual offenders with a focus on cognitive-behavioural and multi-systemic treatment


APD1238 H

This course considers how various models address the problem of human development: nativist, maturationist, constructivist, and enculturation accounts. Several themes emerge. The first is the epistemological foundation of developmental theory, that is, how it deals with the problem of knowledge. Second, how do theories address the problematic role of sociality and language in human development? A third theme is the internal coherence of development: is development global or modularized?


APD1238 H

This course focuses on central aspects of social cognition in childhood and adolescence as they pertain to understandings of social justice. Topics will include: social cognition (e.g., perspective-taking, sociomoral reasoning); social attitude and belief formation and their behavioural manifestations (e.g., inclusion/exclusion, stereotyping, bullying, civic engagement); awareness of inter-group bias (e.g., racism, sexism, classism); developmental models of discrimination and prejudice; and psychological perspectives on intervention programs designed to promote understandings of social difference in educational contexts (e.g., antiracist and inclusive education, educating for social justice).


APD1238 H

This course is designed for practicing educators to examine theory, practice and research on the nature and nurture of creativity. It will look at four aspects of creativity: process, product, person and press (environment), with emphasis placed on the study of the socio-cultural and psychological inhibitors and facilitators of creative development. Classroom application of various techniques, strategies, instructional programs and resource materials that foster the development of creative thinking and creative problem


APD1238 H

This course will examine how individuals and institutions define and pursue excellence in both formal and informal educational settings. The course will examine what academic excellence means to students and researchers in education, and how these definitions are reflected in how institutions are organized and how students are taught and assessed. We will look at the issue of academic excellence both historically and in terms of what a utopian educational setting might look like.


APD1238 H

In this course, students will learn how to design and implement a knowledge-building approach to science learning and instruction for junior school students using content from the new Ontario Science and Technology Curriculum and research on how children construct their understanding of big ideas in science. Although this is not a course on technology, students will have an opportunity to construct a class database in Knowledge Forum(TM) where they can contribute ideas, read and build on fellow students' ideas. Additionally, students will have access to databases constructed by elementary students and to a database constructed by teachers from around North America. These resources will help students as they design and implement a science lesson. Readings will be drawn from a variety of sources rather than any one book. This course will be highly interactive, reflective and centered on personal knowledge-building of science.


APD1238 H

This is a course in early language acquisition during the preschool years and subsequent development in elementary school. The course will present linguistic, psycholinguistic, cognitive, and social interactionist perspectives on the stages and sequences in children’s language growth and will incorporate discussions of bilingual development and atypical development wherever relevant.


APD1238 H

This will be a graduate level seminar that will address fundamental questions regarding language acquisition (with a particular focus on word learning) and communication. We will explore recent theoretical debates and findings in relation to questions such as the following: (1) Is the acquisition of words driven by perceptual versus conceptual processes? (2) What social-cognitive processes underlie word acquisition? (3) How are visual and linguistic information integrated in spoken-language comprehension? (4) When and how do babies appreciate the mental impact of language? (5) How do babies and young children learn to use language for communication?


APD1238 H

This course combines psychological and sociolinguistic approaches to literacy in theory and practice. It takes a cross-cultural and cross-linguistic comparative perspective. Topics include origin and definitions of writing systems, basic processes in learning to read different writing systems, such as English, Chinese, Japanese, etc., literacy as a tool for thinking, literacy as a social practice, and literacy practice across culture, gender, and ethnicity.


APD1238 H

Examination of the principles of measurement and achievement: validity (are we really testing the right content?), reliability (how accurate are those results?), comparability (can the results be compared, especially across time?), and fairness (is the test or the testing method biased against certain students or groups?). Consideration of the purposes, advantages, limitations, and dangers of standardized student testing. Examination of the recent history of provincial testing policies and implementations. Review of the methodologies of test preparation, vakidation, administration, scoring, analysis, and reporting. Survey of the interpretation and use of assessment results by students, teachers, educational administrators, and the public. Study of the consequences of the interpretation and use of test scores. The course will focus on the provincial testing programs of the Educational Quality and Accountability Office of Ontario, EQAO, with some extension to local testing and to national and international projects. The goal is to build knowledge and expertise so that educators, including front-line teachers and administrators, can be judicious consumers of provincial assessment results and leaders in affecting assessment policies and practices.


APD1238 H

The intent of this course is to facilitate students' understanding of executive functions and the relations between executive functions and children's achievement and behaviour. This course also examines interventions designed to address weaknesses in executive processes (e.g., planning, self-monitoring, and goal-setting) in children and youth.


APD1238 H

This course is designed to instruct students in an empirically supported and success-focused model for proactive classroom management in either special education or inclusive settings. Students will learn the skills necessary to proactively prevent problem behaviour in the classroom that can impede classroom objectives. Students will be taught to conduct informal assessments of serious conduct problems in the classroom to determine the contextual factors that are maintaining problem responses. They will also learn strategies for intervening with students with success-focused strategies that greatly reduce problem responses without punishment or intrusion on the child. The course is ideal for teachers in specialized settings in which problem behaviour is common or for those responsible for providing training or supports to teachers of children with


APD1238 H

A course designed to permit the study (in a formal class setting) of a specific area of human development and applied psychology not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session timetables.


APD1238 H

This course aims to bridge the gap between current neuroscientific understanding of ADHD and classroom practice. A critical review of the neuroscience of ADHD will focus on cognitive characteristics and the implications for learning and functioning in the classroom. Based on models of the Reflective Practitioner, Inclusive Education, Universal Design for Learning and Differentiated Instruction, students will be introduced to and guided in using a framework for selecting and adapting instructional practices to address the learning needs of students manifesting the classic characteristics of ADHD and related problems. Prerequisites: HDP2280 and HDP1285


APD1238 H

Over childhood and adolescence, there is rapid development in individuals’ ability to understand and regulate their emotions (e.g., Shonkoff & Phillips, 2000). These individual differences, in turn, have a substantial impact on individuals’ successes or failures in educational environments. In the first half of the course, we will examine the interplay of psychosocial, cognitive, and biological processes in the development of emotion regulation in infancy, childhood, adolescence, and into adulthood.  Characteristics and determinants of typical and typical emotional regulation at each age will be established.  The second half of the course will explore ways in which healthier emotion regulation can be promoted, with particular attention to applications within educational environments.  Specifically, we will discuss cognitive, neuropsychological, relational, mindfulness, and classroom-based approaches to enhancing emotional regulation skills in children, adolescents and young


APD1238 H

An examination of current discussions of mathematics difficulties and disabilities. Topics will include: (i) identification, screening, diagnosis, and common characteristics of mathematics difficulties and disabilities; (ii) the relationship between mathematics disabilities and reading disabilities; (iii) evidence based instruction for mathematics disabilities and difficulties. Pre-requisite: HDP2292 and/or HDP1285


APD1238 H

This course will examine research on instruction and relate it to what we know about cognition as well as recent research on the brain. It will examine the contributions of cognitive science to instruction, for instance, learning as a constructive process in which prior knowledge plays a crucial role. We will look at recent meta- analyses which provide information about the efficacy of various instructional strategies and relate these finding to general principles of cognition. Finally, we will explore research on brain plasticity, and the


APD1238 H

In this course, we study how to present results and interpretations of quantitative information obtained from surveys, experiments, and statistical records. Topics include: design and preparation of tables, analysis and production of graphs and charts, and writing about numbers and quantitative findings.


APD1238 H

This course introduces Rubin’s Causal Model that provides a fundamental framework for conceptualizing causal problems. In addition to studying a variety of experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental designs in social scientific and educational research, students will be introduced to cutting-edge techniques of causal inference. These include propensity score matching and stratification, inverse-probability-of-treatment weighting, selection models, and the instrumental variable method. Emphasis will be placed on comparing alternative research designs and on clarifying assumptions for each design in the contexts of various application examples. The course is aimed at equipping students with preliminary knowledge and skills necessary for appraising and conducting empirical research about causality. Students can either take it as a stand-alone course or as a prerequisite for a Structural Equation Modeling course (soon to be developed). Prerequisite: HDP1288 (Intermediate Statistics) or equivalent.


APD1238 H

This course focuses on reading disabilities and evidence-based approaches to assessment, intervention, and educational accommodations. The first half of the course focuses on the core concepts of reading and reading disabilities, including definitions, typical acquisition and development of reading and reading-related skills, genetic and environmental factors influencing reading acquisition and reading disabilities, as well as the definition, prevalence, types, and developmental course of reading disabilities. Also, cognitive models of reading and reading disabilities are highlighted, especially phonological theory and models of reading comprehension. The second half of the course aims to bridge theory and practice. Accordingly, it will review evidence-based reading interventions for students in the early grades which focus primarily on word-level reading, as well as interventions for older students which focus on fluency and comprehension. The course will conclude with discussion on the critical role of accommodations and the supporting evidence to justify the need for accommodations for students throughout their elementary, high-school, and college education.


APD1238 H

This course explores how individuals with autism develop an understanding of themselves and of others across the life span. Topics include the development of emotional understanding, theory of mind, self-concept, autobiographical memory, self-awareness, and understanding relationships. The course will also explore theoretical, empirical, and auto/biographical accounts of how self-understanding affects life adaptation and life satisfaction.?The course will focus on exploring the challenges children with autism face in the classroom. Specific interventions that can be used by educators will be explored.


APD1238 H

In recent years there has been a new focus on algebra in elementary school. Rather than delay the teaching of algebra until high school, school boards across Canada are including activities that promote algebraic reasoning in their mathematics curricula starting in Kindergarten. This course is designed to acquaint students with current theories and research on the development and learning of algebraic reasoning in elementary school. Algebraic reasoning goes beyond what is typically thought of as "algebra". Kieran (1996) defines algebraic reasoning as "the use of any of a variety of representations that handle quantitative situations in a relational way". Driscoll (1999) says that algebraic thinking can be considered to be the "capacity to represent quantitative situations so that relations among variables become apparent". The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics considers early algebra to comprise four separate strands: 1) the representation and analysis of mathematical situations using algebraic symbols; 2) modeling of mathematics; 3) analyses of change and 4) patterns, relations and functions. In this course we will look closely at these strands and conduct brief research projects on the development and learning trajectories of one of these strands.


APD1238 H

This course will bridge the gap between neuroscience, genetics, cognitive psychology and education. Students will become familiar with new research in these diverse areas and discuss how this research will impact educational instruction and policy.


APD1238 H

This course will focus on general developmental issues concerning young children and mathematics learning. As part of this course, we will examine international early years mathematics curricula as well as Ontario’s early years focus on inquiry and play-based learning in mathematics. Investigations of mathematics content area include: the development of number sense and early arithmetic, spatial and geometric understandings, classification and data management and patterning.


APD1245 H

This course is intended to introduce students to basics of theory and practice of three brief counselling models: Cognitive Therapy, Behaviour Therapy, and Solution Focused Brief Therapy via discussions on the required readings, instructor demonstration of specific techniques, class role plays, regular practice of techniques with classmates, and analysisand critique of DVDs of expert clinicians. Students will learn how to do a suicide risk assessment and will develop a solid understanding of the principles of crisis intervention. Related ethical and professional practice issues will be addressed. Students will learn to compare and contrast these three brief counselling models and how and when to


APD1247 H

This course must be taken in conjunction with 1203Y Practicum in Counselling. The two courses may only be taken by students enrolled in Counselling programs. All students must arrange their practica in consultation with the department's Coordinator of Internship and Counselling Services.


APD1249 H

This course will review theories of social and emotional development, and then follow the child's social- emotional growth from birth through adolescence. Within the context of children's family and peer relationships we will consider the ways in which emotional and social experience becomes patterned, organized, and represented by the child and by others. We will examine the implications of these issues for problematic outcomes in families, daycares, and schools, and for prevention and intervention practices.


APD1252 H

Specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing upon topics that are of particular interest to the student but are not included in available courses. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to such a topic.


APD1253 H

This course examines the principles and practices of feminist therapy, theories of female development and the psychology of women. Special emphasis is placed on relational theories. Specialized techniques and their application to specific and diverse groups of women will be reviewed.


APD1256 H

An examination of the nature and consequences of child maltreatment. Theory and research in physical, sexual, and emotional abuse will be reviewed. Coverage includes recent therapeutic interventions and promising prevention initiatives. The objective of this course is to provide a knowledge base for more effective practice and inquiry.


APD1259 H

This course examines the connections between family systems and the educational system. Family-service connections with childcare and other services are also considered, with emphasis on early childhood. Particular attention is paid to the literature on parent-community involvement in education and related program and policy matters.


APD1261 H

Presentation of models of group work processes, as well as of current theory applicable to group work in counselling. Students will be expected to develop a catalogue of skills and ideas useful in the school setting, and to develop communication skills essential to group work. For students enrolled in Counselling programs


APD1262 H

A survey of standardized tests typically used by counsellors in schools, community colleges, and other settings. Topics included are: a review of the basic concepts in tests and measurement; criteria for evaluating educational and psychological tests; rationale underlying the development of various tests; and practice in administration of tests and interpretation of test results. Individual intelligence scales and projective techniques are beyond the scope of this course.


APD1263 H

Quantitative and qualitative alternatives in the design and conduct of counselling research will be examined. Limitations on research from practical and ethical considerations will be addressed. Students will be introduced to library, computer, and consulting resources within OISE/UT. (Limited to Counselling Psychology for Psychology Specialists students.)


APD1265 H

This course deals with current issues and research in particular areas of social and personality development. The focus of the course will vary from year to year and will include identity and personality formation, emotional influences on development, and moral development. As well as examining current research, we will consider the implications of this research for the contexts in which children are socialized and the developmental outcomes that result from different kinds of experience.


APD1266 H

This course aims at preparing the counsellor for an expanded role in career guidance. It deals with all major aspects of career development. The topics covered are: social and economic context, theories of career development, the role of information, assessment of career development, career guidance programs, and recurring issues in career guidance. This course is limited to students in a U of T graduate degree program. Others by permission of instructor.


APD1268 H

This course will focus on the theories of career development and counselling techniques to deal with major career transitions. Topics will include mid-life career changes, career psychology of women, career planning and development in the workplace, relocation counselling, and retirement and leisure counselling. This course is limited to students in a U of T graduate degree program. Others by permission of instructor.


APD1269 H

This course has both an assessment and intervention focus. Students will learn how to complement their existing assessment skills by accessing clients' images. Students will also learn how to work with images as they spontaneously occur in therapy. In addition specific interventions that are based on imagery will be examined. These include various forms of relaxation, desensitization, stress innoculation, and imaginal exposure. The class is a combination of didactic material, role plays and experiential exercises. The application to different client groups will be discussed.


APD1272 H

A series of seminars dealing with the definition of the term "play" and its relation to both psychological and educational processes in the young child. The history of play will be examined in relationship to various theories that have been advanced concerning the need children have to play, the functions of play, and their relationship to psychological, social, cognitive, emotional, and physical development. Note: This course is intended primarily for Child Study and Education students and M.Ed. students with an interest in adaptive instruction and special education. Others must seek the permission of the instructor to register.


APD1275 H

This course will provide students with a thorough overview of the field of Mindfulness and Psychotherapy from theoretical, clinical and research perspectives. At the end of the course, students would be able to apply mindfulness tools in their personal and clinical practice. They will also have an understanding of the major theoretical, clinical and research trends in the field.


APD1275 H

Conduct disorder (CD) involves the persistent patterns of antisocial behaviours displayed over time during childhood and adolescence. Research has shown that CD is the most common referral reason to a children’s mental health centre in North America and that these children consume the most resources and are the most expensive to serve. The issue of antisocial and violent young children has become a pressing issue facing society today. Elementary school aged children are increasingly being identified by police, schools, fire service, child welfare and children’s mental health as angry and aggressive. This interactive course will focus on the issue of CD in boys and girls highlighting gender differences (e.g., pathways and risk factors) and introduce students to three key areas: (1) gender-sensitive risk assessment tools, (2) gender specific clinical risk management strategies; and (3) community mobilization activities. During the course, students will be introduced to Logic Models, risk assessment tools used to increase clinicians’ and researchers’ general understanding of early childhood risk factors, have an opportunity to construct risk summaries and assist in the creation of effective clinical risk management plans for high-risk children and their families utilizing case examples. In addition, students will be introduced to a Canadian evidence-based cognitive- behavioural strategy called SNAP™ -- this self-control and problem-solving strategy is being used across North America and Europe. Actual live observations of SNAP™ Groups (parent and child) will be made available to students interested in learning more about this program. This course will be of interest to students seeking to broaden their understanding, knowledge and skills in working with conduct disordered children and their families.


APD1275 H

The course will introduce students to the philosophy and approach of Gestalt therapy and counselling.Topics covered will include: the history and background of Gestalt, the importance of awareness (living in the Here and Now), finishing unfinshed business (closure and completion),responsibility, choice and freedom, contact and relating (I and Thou), and the need for clear boundaries in our relationships.


APD1275 H

This course examines the many factors likely to change both the world of work and the delivery of education for everyone over the next five to ten years. Although different possible scenarios and change factors will be discussed, the primary emphasis will be on the increasing influence of digitization, deregulation, and globalization. The main objective of the course will be to explore the various adaptive and creative educational, workplace and life challenges implied by these potential changes. .


APD1275 H

This course will explore issues related to workplace stress. Basic concepts of occupational stress, it's relationship to performance and health will be covered, however the focus will be on methods of assessing and managing specific stress and stressors. A wide scope of stressors will be explored from environmental and ergonomic to interpersonal conflict and family vs. work demands. The course will examine stress related issues such as alcoholism and depression in the workplace, mass psychogenic illness, violence and other stressors specific to occupations such as educational workers, paramedics and occupations of interest to students.


APD1275 H

Since loss is a universal experience, counsellors need an understanding of the grieving processes associated with change and leave-takings across the lifespan. This course explores the many faces of grief as experienced by individuals, families and communities. It identifies signs of blocked grief as well as cultural and gender expressions. It offers helpful counselling skills and interventions to assist individuals and groups through transitions, bereavement, and grief. .


APD1275 H

This course will examine different personality theories (i.e. psychodynamic theories of Freud and Jung, the personality structure theories of Murray and Cattell, the perceived reality perspective of Kelly and Rogers, and the learning-based theories of Skinner, Dollar, Miller, Eysenck and Bandura, among others). Personality theories will be discussed and explored in the context of their usefulness to psychological assessment in general and personality assessment in particular, and for the understanding of other aspects of functioning such as intellectual ability and deficits. Personality tests and measurements will be introduced and their value and benefit studied. Examination of projective measures, such as the Rorschach Ink Blot Test, Thematic Apperception Test as well as Objective tools such as MMPI-2, MCI and others will be offered as part of the


APD1275 H

In contrast to the nature of life in traditional African societies, the modern African environment is characterized by the presence of an unpredictable world where people grow up with few definite guidelines on how to confront the problems of living. Increasingly bereft of the usual social support of the extended family system and the typical cultural patterns of interventions in emergencies, people are constantly faced with enormous psychological brokenness and identity fragmentation arising from the complicated nature of the new cultural environment under which we live and work. This course is intended to give an overview of the efforts that trained psychotherapists in Africa are making to blend what is good in the healing systems of the indigenous Africa and the West to fashion an appropriate response to the psychological needs and problems of the contemporary African clients. The course will be relevant for people who intend to practice counseling and psychotherapy with clients from non-Western cultures. It is also expected that counselors in Western settings might be able to draw some insights from the course to improve their practice.


APD1275 H

This course will familiarize students with current issues and debates concerning the theory and practice of counselling and psychotherapy in a multicultural society. Particular emphasis will be given to understanding the relationship between the historical, socio-cultural and political contexts of the production of qualitative and quantitative research in this field. The course is appropriate for students considering a dissertation proposal in multicultural counselling and psychotherapy. A weekly seminar will focus on research methods and methodologies, the design and structure of the research, sampling procedures, ethical issues, empirical constraints and production of new knowledge(s). Students will review, analyze and redesign representative studies in the multicultural literature which will eventually lead to the development of a thesis proposal. .


APD1275 H

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of spirituality, focussing on individual's spiritual growth in relationship to psychology. Psychological effects gained through the practice of meditation and yoga that lead to self-healing or spiritual healing, as well as guided imagery will be examined. Discussed topics unite the Western and the Eastern thought as a way of achieving inner wholeness.


APD1275 H

From the brain to behaviour to bedside rehabilitation, this course will focus on the assessment and treatment of brain-related diseases. A strong emphasis will be placed on understanding biological bases of behaviour and cognitive processes as they related to conditions such as schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury and acquired brain injury. .


APD1275 H

This course examines the strengths and vulnerabilities of adolescents and youth and how they may facilitate or impede interventions. Focus will be on identity function, risktaking, family relations, and friendships. Problem areas covered include substance abuse, violence, gangs, and eating disorders.


APD1275 H

This course will take the treatment perspective to vocational development:  that is, how strategies and/or interventions may be applied to overcome discontinuities or delays in vocational development.  The topics to be considered include the nature of work in society, vocational development theory, the career counselling process, and strategies to remediate career development/decision problems. As a result of this course students will be able to:  1. understand and implement different career counselling models  2. understand and implement different strategies to remediate problems in vocational development and/or career decision-making  3. develop their assessment, goal setting and intervention planning skills


APD1275 H

This course will examine school violence and behavioural maladjustment in children and youth as they relate to the provision of counselling services or behaviour management initiatives in school settings. Emphasis will be placed on identifying counselling and behavioural management strategies that can be used with disruptive and/or misguided youth. Topics will include aggression, school violence, the effects of mental health in the classroom, and an examination of the personal, social and environmental factors that often impact on the effectiveness of intervention strategies. Targeted school violence and bullying are intended to serve as general models of violence to inform class discussion. To serve in the synthesis of various course topics, a variety of subject related contemporary feature films will be viewed and discussed in class.


APD1275 H

This course examines an area of high relevance to both psychology and education. Mindfulness-based practices are currently in great demand and training resources are few. We support the availability of these resources at the graduate level along with our intervention-based courses. This will complement our course offerings and is entirely consistent with our emphasis on applicability to both counselling and education.


APD1275 H

Drugs that affect cognition and feeling and behaviour are pervasive in our society. We use them legally and illegally, for recreation, self-medication, and the treatment of illness. We will review the development and use of therapeutic agents in the treatment of mental disorders (including substance abuse itself). We will look at the use and misuse of the most common therapeutic agents in health care settings. A special emphasis will be on the trend toward comparing, contrasting, and combining behavioural with pharmacological intervention in the treatment of mental disorders. .


APD1275 H

The theoretical background and training involved in this course is an essential component of overall training in counselling psychology interventions. This course is an integral part of current training in counselling and clinical psychology interventions and was a missing component of our program. The topic of this course is highly in demand by counselling and clinical psychology students. While we have an advanced doctoral course on a similar topic, no course is available currently for Master's level students.


APD1275 H

This course introduces you to the theory and practice of counselling psychology from various theoretical perspectives. For each theoretical orientation studied, we will address -key concepts (view of human nature, assumptions, and principles of the theory) -Therapeutic process (therapist goals and functions, client’s experience in therapy, therapist/client relationship. -Therapeutic techniques -Multicultural issues as they relate to this theory (e.g., strengths and weaknesses with regard to particular


APD1275 H

This course will examine the usefulness of Neuropsychology and Neuropsychological evaluation, in the context of Psychological practice and application. The course would offer a window into the history of this branch of Psychology, the assessment of possible Neurological deficit and disorder following different Neurological traumas such as TBI MVA and CVA as well as a result of chronic and acute illness. Some discussion would take place regarding Neuropsychology and the developing brain and a brief examination of assessment for learning difficulties and disordered attention.


APD1275 H

Open to Counselling students at all levels. We will consider the implications of the principles in the Spirit of Renewal for counselling. Course participants will engage in exercises from "Connecting With Your Inner Life" to consider the relevance of these exercises for their clients. Exercises include such topics as "Connecting with your inner wisdom", "Disconnecting from your Inner Critic", "Connecting with your capacity for inner movement".


APD1275 H

This emerging area of psychological practice focuses on the application of psychological theories, principles, and techniques to enhance optimal performance among athletes, performing artists, business people, and those in high risk occupations. Performance issues include psychological skills training in the performance domain, the quality of the performance experience, and performer's personal growth. Necessary elements to optimal consulting include: knowledge of counselling skills, knowledge of consultation skills, understanding of systems issues, knowledge of psychological skills techniques such as those used in sport psychology, and domain-specific knowledge.


APD1275 H

This introductory course will examine contemporary youth issues which make exceptional demands on the personal and professional resources of teachers, counsellors, and on the school system. Topics to be presented will include street youth, teen gangs, and youth and violence. Course material will cover issues of etiology, strategies for counselling and intervention, and implications for schools and educators. . .


APD1275 H

This course will focus on understanding the treatment of individuals with IPT, a brief psychotherapy initially developed to treat depression--Interpersonal Therapy (IPT). More recently, it has been used to treat individuals with a broad range of diagnoses including depression in the medically ill, Borderline Personality Disorder, and adolescents. IPT is a well researched psychotherapy with proven effectiveness in a variety of depressive spectrum disorders. Their Interpersonal Therapy Clinic at the Clarke is the only clinic in Canada dedicated to providing treatment and training in the Interpersonal Therapy model. Participants will become familiar with the history and development of IPT (including the NIMH Collaborative Trial on Depression) as well as the treatment parameters of IPT. Participants will learn how to identify suitable clients for IPT and how to complete an interpersonal inventory. Participants will view video tapes, participate in small and large group discussions, and present a case vignette tied to course material. Feedback on knowledge skills will be given throughout the course.


APD1275 H

A course designed to permit the study (in a formal class setting) of a specific area of counselling psychology not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session timetables.


APD1278 H

This course covers current theory and principles of cognitive therapy in the treatment of anxiety and depression. Special applications such as grief counselling, bereavement and post-traumatic stress disorders


APD1279 H

This course examines evidenced based efforts to prevent problems that place children and youth at risk. Focus will be on ways of reducing risk and increasing protective factors. Coverage includes interventions that effectively deal with health, social, and educational issues impacting well being and life chances. Poverty, chronic illness, and intentional and unintentional injury are some of the areas surveyed.


APD1284 H

Psychological and educational characteristics of children and adolescents with behaviour disorders with an emphasis on the interplay between constitutional and environmental factors that contribute to these disorders. Research on current assessment and intervention procedures will be analysed. NOTE: This course is intended primarily for Child Study and Education students and M.Ed. students with an interest in adaptive instruction and special education. Others must seek the permission of the instructor to register.


APD1285 H

Psychological and educational characteristics of children and adolescents with learning disabilities and ADHD with an emphasis on the constitutional and environmental factors that contribute to these disabilities and enable optimal functioning. Emphasis is placed on the concept of learning disability and on the educational implications of the research literature in the field. NOTE: This course is intended primarily for Child Study and Education students, School and Clinical Child Psychology students and M.Ed. students with an interest in adaptive instruction and special education.


APD1287 H

This course provides an introduction to quantitative methods of inquiry and a foundation for more advanced courses in applied statistics for students in education and social sciences. The course covers univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics; an introduction to sampling, experimental design and statistical inference; contingency tables and Chi-square; t-test, analysis of variance, and regression. Students will learn to use SPSS software. At the end of the course, students should be able to define and use the descriptive and inferential statistics taught in this course to analyze real data and to interpret the analytical results. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL2004 are prohibited from taking this course.


APD1288 H

Survey sampling, experimental design, and power analysis; analysis of variance for one-way and multi-way data with fixed, mixed, and random effects models; linear and multiple regression; multiple correlation; analysis of covariance. Note: This course is intended primarily for OISE students. Others must seek the permission of the instructor to register. Students who have previously taken CTL2808 are prohibited from taking this course. Prerequisite: HDP1287 or equivalent.


APD1289 H

Multistage, stratified sampling, multi-factor experimental designs, and multivariate statistical procedures, including multiple regression analysis, multivariate significance tests, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, canonical analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, logistic regression and log-linear analysis are discussed with application to research design and data analysis. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL2809 are prohibited from taking this course. Prerequisite: HDP1288 or equivalent.


APD1290 H

This course seeks to define, redefine and locate Indigenous and traditional healing in the context of Euro- North American counseling and psychotherapy. In particular, the course will examine cultural and traditional healing within the broader economic, social and political practices of mental health care and in Canada. While the focus is in counseling psychology and psychoeducation (pedagogy), it also provides a critical site to highlight challenges and transformations within health care, thus the course will draw attention to the use of traditional healing in mental health care and counselor education. Explorations of the currents issues and debates concerned with the contemporary practices of Indigenous healing will be a key features of the course, for example, cultural respect and appropriation, ethics and confidentiality, competence of Indigenous healers and their qualifications and training. Through an in-depth analysis of international Indigenous helping and healing practices, with particular focus on Canadian Indigenous perspectives, the course will undertake to raise questions regarding the theory, practice, and research of Indigenous mental health and healing in psychology and education. As part of the exploration of Indigenous healers and healing, the course will also focus on how peoples from non-dominant cultures construct illness perceptions and the kinds of treatments they expect to use to solve mental health problems through individual and community psychology interventions. In this respect the course is also intended to contribute to community development and community health promotion.


APD1291 H

This course will explore the role of the counsellor/counselling psychologist in the field of addictive behaviours. Through lectures, interactive discussions, video demonstrations, group presentations, and experiential exercises, students will become familiar with various theoretical models of addiction, approaches to assessment, and common intervention methods and techniques. Several intervention approaches will be examined, including behavioural, cognitive-behavioural and motivational interventions, relapse prevention, and self-help approaches. Although the primary emphasis will be on substance use issues, other addictive behaviours will be covered (e.g., gambling).


APD1292 H

Introduction to the theory and practice of educational and psychological measurement. Topics include test development, classical test theory and item response theory, with applications to norm-referenced and criterion-referenced standardized achievement tests, group intelligence and aptitude tests, attitude and self- report scales, personality tests, performance assessments, questionnaires, and interview protocols. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL2801or HDP1292H are prohibited from taking this course. Prerequisite: HDP1287 or equivalent.


APD1293 H

This seminar is intended primarily for doctoral students. There are two main activities. One is the cooperative critiquing and development of research designs and data analysis plans based on ongoing work of the students in the course. The second is discussion of selected topics in research design and data analysis, e.g. balanced incomplete block experimental designs, replicated survey designs, exploratory analysis, general linear models, optimal and multidimensional scaling, data visualization, and computerized research design, data analysis, and graphical methods and tools. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL2807 are prohibited from taking this course. Prerequisite: HDP1288 or permission of the instructor.


APD1294 H

This course examines psychological theories of play and has a focus on the role of technology in play across the life span (e.g., Vygotsky, Huizinga, Brown) in relation to the role of technology in play (e.g., Resnick, Gee, Squires) from both human developmental and educational perspectives. Topics addressing play include: gamification, , trust, collaboration and passion to learn.  In addition, we will address the growing role of technology in 'eduplay' and  emerging social implications (e,g., concerns of addiction to gaming, social media, and networked connectedness).


APD1296 H

This course focuses on theoretical issues and practical approaches associated with assessing the language development of school-aged students who learn English as a second or an additional language in K-12 curriculum learning contexts. These school-aged students represent various groups of language learners, including immigrant children, indigenous language-speaking students, and second- or third-generation children who enter the school with fluent oral proficiency but with limited literacy skills in a language used as the medium of instruction at school. Students in both Master’s and Doctoral programs whose research interest and professional work are related to these populations may benefit from taking this course. In this course, students will engage in discussions about the complexity of assessment and tension arising from the multiple roles educators are asked to play in assessing language learners. Students are expected to develop assessment competencies required to develop the ability to design, implement, and critically evaluate assessment.


APD2200 Y

A course designed to develop the skills and knowledge fundamental to a developmentally oriented systematic study of children through observing, recording, interpreting, and reporting in a professional manner the behaviour and development of children in diverse practice and research settings. A range of methods from direct observation to standardized testing will be surveyed. The role of the teacher-researcher and issues in connecting research and practice will be emphasized. Note: This course is normally open to students in the M.A. in Child Study and Education program only.


APD2201 H

A seminar examining the teaching-learning interaction between adults and children in preschool, primary, and junior educational settings. Emphasis is on the integration of teaching practice with principles of child development and learning theory. This seminar draws on the students' experiences from practicum placements. Students are placed in classrooms in the Institute's Laboratory School, in public and separate schools, and in other settings. Students are under the joint supervision of an associate teacher on site and an acdemic staff member at the Institute of Child Study. There are four practicum sessions, each providing 72 hours of practicum experience in 4, six-week, half-day blocks. Note: This course is normally open to students in the M.A. in Child Study and Education program only.


APD2202 H

This seminar will provide for discussion of topics and issues that emerge during the students' internship (HDP2221Y Advanced Teaching Practicum) and that relate to employment preparation. Note: This course is normally open to students in the M.A. in Child Study and Education program only.


APD2210 Y

A study of education techniques and the role of the teacher in designing, implementing and evaluating curricula for children aged three to twelve. Basic areas of the elementary curriculum are introduced, including designing educational programs, early childhood, language and literacy, mathematics and science. Note: This course is normally open to students in the M.A. in Child Study and Education program only.


APD2211 H

This course provides a foundation of understanding for language and literacy instruction, translating current theory and research into evidence-based practice. The course considers reading and writing acquisition in terms of the component processes involved at various stages of literacy development. The goal of the course is to engender thoughtful, critical, informed decisions about the teaching of language and literacy in the schools. Teachers successfully completing the course will be prepared to develop and implement theoretically-sound, practical and motivating classroom literacy programs for the primary and junior grades. Note: This course is normally open to students in the M.A. in Child Study and Education program only.


APD2212 H

A detailed study of the design, implementation, and evaluation of the elementary curriculum in the area of mathematics. The practical issues are informed by theoretical considerations of children's cognitive development from infancy onwards, particularly the ways in which implicit knowledge becomes explicit, and naive theories become formalized. Note: This course is normally open to students in the M.A. in Child Study and Education program only.


APD2214 H

This course will provide students with an introduction to a broad range of curriculum areas important to elementary education. These areas include health education, social studies, environmental education, the arts (music, drama, art), and physical education. Students will also have the opportunity to examine issues related to diversity and equity, school law, and the application of technology across the curriculum. This course will also enhance students' understanding of curriculum integration. The course will discuss how to design and implement instruction in these areas that is consistent with the learning expectations in the Ontario Curriculum (early childhood, primary, and junior years). Pre-requiste: HDP2210Y


APD2220 H

First year Child Study and Education students are placed in classrooms in the Institute's Laboratory School, in public and separate schools, and in other settings. Students are under the joint supervision of an associate teacher on site and an academic staff member at the Institute of Child Study. There are four practicum sessions, each providing 72 hours of practicum experience in four, six-week, half-day blocks. This course is normally open to students in the MA in Child Study and Education program only.


APD2221 Y

Second year Child Study and Education students carry out a single practicum placement called an internship during either the fall or winter term for a total of 320 practicum hours. Supervised by a mentor teacher on site and a staff member from the Institute of Child Study in an assigned setting from preschool through grade six, students have an opportunity to consolidate developing skills and attitudes as they apply their teaching skills.


APD2230 H

An educational program consists of a sequence of learning activities carried out over an extended period of time to accomplish a number of long-term learning goals. The main goal of this course is to help students learn how to plan educational programs that can accommodate a variety of children and achieve a variety of learning goals.


APD2252 H

Specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing upon topics that are of particular interest to the student but are not included in available courses. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to such a topic.


APD2275 H

This course will examine the potential of microcomputer-based technology in various types of learning environments. The focus is on the use of adaptive and assistive technology as a tool to increase the teacher's ability to handle a wide range of student learning needs in main streamed classrooms. The course is suitable for students in the departments of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning and Human Development and Applied Psychology.


APD2280 H

A critical analysis of current issues related to identification and programming for children with special needs. The emphasis is on using well-founded research to inform instructional practices and decision-making. This course is designed to promote reflective thinking about key topics in Special Education that educators must conceptualize from both theoretical and practical perspectives. It is intended to provide students with knowledge, skills, and attitudes that will enable evidence-based understanding of what is involved in working with exceptional learners across a variety of settings, but primarily in an inclusive classroom situation. Focus is placed on curriculum being flexible in responding to diversity, so that teachers are guided to make appropriate accommodations and modified expectations for the various categories of exceptionality. Since characteristics of special needs and second language learners are often inter-related, ESL support will also be


APD2292 H

Critical analysis of assessment procedures including psychometric tests, curriculum-based assessment, and dynamic assessment and of the function of assessment in relation to adaptive instruction. A practical component is included. Prerequisite: HDP2280H or equivalent


APD2293 H

Introductory course in the critical evaluation of research reports. Emphasis on understanding and interpretation of the outcome of basic statistical and research methods. Hands-on experience in research


APD2296 H

This course focuses on prevention and intervention in the area of reading and writing difficulties and disabilities. It is designed to prepare special educators and classroom teachers to implement evidence-based practice in the assessment and instruction of children with reading and writing problems. Half of the course is concerned with assessment, including informal and standardized approaches, and the remainder is concerned with research-based interventions to meet specific programming needs. Both parts involve hands- on strategies with children and adolescents who have serious reading and writing difficulties. Note: Permission of the instructor is required. Priority will be given to students with background knowledge and experience in child study and education, adaptive instruction and special education.


APD3200 H

This course provides a doctoral-level survey of developmental psychology and the role of formal education in human development. At the end of the course, students are expected to have sufficient knowledge of the history and theories of developmental psychology and the role of education in development to be able to teach an introductory course in developmental psychology and education.


APD3201 H

This course provides an overview of qualitative research methodology and techniques. Coverage includes major philosophy of science, historical, and contemporary (critical, post modern, hermeneutic, constructivist and feminist) perspectives. Ethnographic, life history, individual and multiple case study, and focus group methods will be reviewed in relation to a narrative framework. Observational, interview, personal record, and archival data management will be discussed. Students will have an opportunity to design, implement, analyze, and report a micro qualitative study. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of computers and visual


APD3202 H

This doctoral-level course serves as an introduction to program evaluation used in education, psychology, and social sciences. Program evaluation aims to systematically investigate the process, effectiveness, and outcomes of programs. Its primary goal is to inform decision-making processes based on answers to why it works or doesn’t work and improve the quality of the program. In this course, students will learn the craft of program evaluation at various stages, including: critically appraising evaluation research; assessing program needs, developing a logic model, evaluating the process and outcomes of the program, evaluating efficiency, dealing with ethical issues, warranting evaluation claims, and communicating with stakeholders. This course will focus on both theoretical and practical issues in designing, implementing, and appraising formative and summative evaluations of various educational and invention programs. In this course, we will consider the effects of various social, cultural, and political contextual factors underlying the program.


APD3203 H

This course examines children's developing understanding of themselves and other people as psychological beings, that is, as people who have beliefs, desires, intentions, and emotions. It explores the implications of this development for children's social understanding in the preschool years and beyond, and for their understanding of thinking and learning in school. It also considers children with autism, who apparently fail to develop a theory of mind in the ordinary way, and evaluates different theoretical explanations of children's understanding of the mind.


APD3204 H

An examination of the historical and philosophical bases of modern theories of applied psychology. Emphasis is on counselling, developmental, and educational psychology. The goals of the course are a) to make explicit the origins of current ideas in applied psychology, and b) to demonstrate the importance of historical context in understanding research and practice issues.


APD3205 H

This course examines theoretical perspectives and contemporary research on socialization processes in childhood and adolescence, with particular emphasis on interpersonal relations and values acquisition. Specific topics include: distinguishing characteristics of social cognition (e.g., self-understanding, perspective- taking, and sociomoral reasoning); aspects of social and moral experience (e.g., peer relations, prosocial behaviour); and political dimensions of interpersonal relations (e.g., social responsibility, prejudice) and their manifestation in behaviours such as civic commitment and bullying. The role of gender and culture in development are pervasive themes throughout the course. Note: Open to MA and PhD students SCCP and DPE. Others by permission of the instructor.


APD3208 H

This course focuses on the distinguishing characteristics of development during the adolescent years as depicted in evolving psychological theory and contemporary research. Broad themes will include: adolescent thinking and decision-making; self-concept and identity formation; interpersonal relations, socio-moral development, and values acquisition; sexuality and health; and the role of gender and culture in shaping adolescent experience. The course is intended for students whose research focuses on adolescents and those who are working with adolescents in educational, clinical, and social contexts. Note: Preference will be given to HDAP students. Students who have already taken HDP3208: A Research Seminar in Adolescent Development are not allowed to take this course.


APD3215 H

Specific issues of counselling and psychotherapy are examined within an integrative framework of emotional processing. An in-depth examination of a counselling model will be included. Open to doctoral students in Counselling Psychology only.


APD3216 H

This course will focus on the application of a counselling model introduced. Students will be required to see clients and develop mastery in the use of theory and techniques. They will gain experience in case formulation, the application of marker-guided interventions and the development and maintenance of the therapeutic alliance. Prerequisite: AEC3215H


APD3217 Y

A course aimed at the further enhancement of counselling skills through the integration of clinical experience and research. Ph.D. and Ed.D. students in Counselling Psychology are required to complete a 500 hour practicum field placement in conjunction with this course. All students must arrange their practica in consultation with the Department's Coordinator of Internships and Counselling Services. Continuing students should plan to contact the Coordinator by March 15 (preferably earlier) and new students as soon as they have been notified of their acceptance to the program.


APD3218 H

A weekly seminar focusing on design and methodology in counselling and psychotherapy research. Students will analyse and redesign representative studies in the counselling literature. Each student will design a study or research program based on a thorough review of a particular counselling research area. It is expected that the review and research design will serve as a basis for a dissertation proposal for many students. Open to Counselling Psychology students only.


APD3221 H

This course is designed to help students develop an appreciation that diversity issues may influence the way individuals act, the way their problems are expressed and conceived in their milieu and by outsiders, and the way assessment and interventions are treated. Through this course students will develop a solid understanding of the social bases of behavior. The course will examine from a cross-cultural perspective selected topics in psychology and human development pertaining to normative and pathological patterns of behavior in children and youth.


APD3222 H

In this course, students will begin to develop the interpersonal skills and competencies necessary to develop, provide, monitor and evaluate psychotherapeutic prevention programs and interventions aimed at ameliorating social and emotional (psychosocial) problems. Focus of classes will vary, with some classes covering mostly theoretical information and others covering mostly practical skills. In addition, students will observe and, to the extent possible, take part in the provision of group and individual intervention services.


APD3222 Y

The educational goals of this course are to: 1) develop a basic understanding of the major theoretical approaches in psychotherapy and to 2) develop basic psychotherapy skills. Focus of classes will vary, with some classes covering mostly theoretical information and others covering mostly practical skills. In addition, students will observe and, to the extent possible, take part in the provision of group and individual intervention services. Note: Students who have previously taken HDP1222H are not allowed to take this course. Restricted to


APD3224 H

This course serves as an introduction and orientation to issues in psychological assessment. The principles of appropriate and ethical testing are reviewed with emphasis on psychometric theory, test standards, multicultural competence, and communication of findings. Supervised practical experience is provided in the administration and interpretation of representative tests of intellectual achievement, personality, neuropsychological, and occupational functioning to adults. Limited to Counselling Psychology for Psychology


APD3225 H

This course serves as a continuation of 3224H, with a focus on the critical analysis and in-depth understanding of selected theories of personality and diagnostic systems. Within this context, the results of personality inventories, standardized diagnostic interviews, behavioural measures, and neuropsychological tests will be used to prepare case formulations and treatment plans for adults. Prerequisites: AEC3224H and 3258H (Stermac's) Limited to Counselling Psychology for Psychology Specialists Doctoral students.


APD3227 H

This is a graduate-level advanced statistics course designed for students in education and the social sciences whose research involves analyses of multi-level and/or longitudinal data. Examples of multi-level data include students nested within classrooms and schools, teachers nested within schools and school districts, children nested within families and neighbourhoods, and employees nested within organizations. Examples of longitudinal data include repeated measures of child development, students' academic growth, teacher improvement, and organizational change. Multi-level modeling, also called "hierarchical linear modeling (HLM)", resolves the dilemma of "units of analysis". More importantly, it enables researchers to partition variance-covariance components with unbalanced data and to model cross-level effects with improved estimation of precision. This course will cover basic two-level and three-level models, growth curve models, and multi-level experimental and quasi-experimental designs. The objective is to equip students with knowledge and skills to apply multi-level models to their own research contexts. Prerequisite: HDP1287 or equivalent


APD3228 H

Mixed methods research is increasingly being used as an alternative to the traditional mono-method ways of conceiving and implementing inquiries in education and social sciences. In conceptualizing mixed methods studies, various paradigmatic assumptions are still being debated. However, many researchers have stated that the paradigmatic differences have been overdrawn and that paradigmatic incompatibility makes dialogue among researchers less productive. Researchers further acknowledge that philosophical differences are reconcilable through new guiding paradigms that actively embrace and promote mixing methods. Mixed methods researchers reject traditional dualism and prefer action to philosophizing by privileging inquiry questions over assumptive worlds. In this course, students will be introduced to various mixed methods design alternatives that allow researchers to link the purpose of the research to methodologies and integrate findings from mixed methods. This course covers various phases of mixed methods research, including theoretical frameworks of mixed methods research designs, strategic mixed methods sampling, data collection methods, integrative data analysis strategies, and a mixed methods research proposal. This is a doctoral level course designed to serve students who plan to conduct independent research. I anticipate that students will have had prior research experience or course work in research methods. Note: Students who have previously taken course CTL1842, are prohibited from this course.


APD3231 H

This course will draw on contemporary psychoanalytic, cognitive and neuroscientific theories to provide an overview of clinical work with children and adolescents. We will also look at the state of empirical research on psychotherapy effectiveness. The focus will be on clinical observation and use of theory to arrive at an initial case formulation as well as the generation of ongoing hypotheses which inform clinical interventions. Emphasis will be placed on the current self-organization of the client, the transference and what is therapeutically usable or not usable at the present moment in treatment. In keeping with current psychoanalytic practice, therapy is seen from a relational perspective and interventions are rooted in dynamic systems theory. That is to say that, while the major focus is on therapeutic dyad, foci will also include work with parents and /or macrosystems such as the classroom. There will be an equal emphasis on clinical work and on theory and students will be encouraged to bring ongoing case material to class.


APD3238 H

This course will involve consideration of ‘mindfulness’ and its role in psychological well-being. We will discuss the relationship of the concept to Buddhist practice, its history in psychotherapy, its mechanisms of effectiveness, its relationship to the notion of acceptance, and research demonstrating its efficacy as an intervention for internalizing and externalizing disorders in children, adolescents and adults. We will also look in detail at meditation strategies most likely to promote a mindful state of awareness.


APD3238 H

This course examines the development of literacy and literary understanding, from preschool to adulthood. We will look at the relationship between young children’s language, theory of mind and early narrative understanding. We will examine, for instance, when children begin to represent their reader when they write texts; and when they represent the writer when they read texts. The new field of Cognitive Poetics, which integrates psychology and literature, will be introduced. We will discuss "poetic literacy," in particular, the comprehension of literary metaphor. Finally we will examine "internet literacy," for instance, the derivation of meaning from hypertext.


APD3238 H

This course will address the need for graduate students to get their research published and will be coherent with the department’s focus in early child development. The small class format will allow graduate students time for supervised and collaborative writing. Topics will fall under the broad area of early child development including specific research areas such as family literacy, literacy development, parent involvement, drawing, writing numerical understanding, social-emotional development and early childhood policy. The class will meet every two weeks throughout the academic year. Students will take turns providing readings and presenting their own writing in progress for review and feedback by their class colleagues. Each student will submit at least one paper to a journal for publication.


APD3238 H

This course focuses on ADHD and evidence-based approaches to its assessment, diagnosis, and intervention. The course has three major sections. To understand ADHD, it is necessary to be familiar with the historical changes in its conceptualization, the developmental changes in its clinical manifestation (particularly in the educational setting), its current neuroscientific understanding, and its life-span impairments in academic, social and occupational functioning. We will explore these topics on the first part of the course. In the second section, we will explore issues and practices around assessment and diagnosis, from three perspectives (medical, educational, and neuroscience), to understand ongoing controversies and delineate best practices. The third section of the course will focus on evidence-based interventions (medical, educational), with emphasis on school-based, class-wide approaches, and educational accommodations. During this course we will debate current controversial issues, such as the validity of this clinical condition, evidence of permanent disability, pharmacological intervention, evidence for and effectiveness of educational accommodations, feigning ADHD symptoms etc. Students will learn assessment methodologies as well as evidenced-based intervention approaches for individual students, small groups, inclusive classrooms, and special education settings.


APD3238 H

This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of research on cognition (e.g., executive functions) in children and youth with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this course we will discuss the role of cognition in recent theoretical models of ADHD and examine the relations among cognition, attention, and learning in children and youth with ADHD. This course will address a range of issues including the assessment of cognition and behaviour in ADHD and the need to consider comorbidity when studying ADHD. In addition, we will discuss intervention research from a cognitive perspective. Note: Permission of instructor required. Restricted to HDAP Doctoral Students.


APD3238 H

The course introduces the main descriptive and inferential statistical techniques for binary, multiple-category and count data: proportions and odds ratios, multi-way contingency tables, generalized linear models, logistic regression for binary responses, multicategory logit models and loglinear models. The focus of the course is on application of these techniques and interpretation of the results. NOTE: This course is intended primarily for HDAP students. Others must seek the permission of the instructor to register. Prerequisite: HDP 1288 or equivalent.


APD3238 H

Psychology began as a science of consciousness, but in 1912 the APA abandoned the science of consciousness for the science of behavior. So how could Dennett (1991) publish his modern classic "Consciousness Explained" and many others now say that science can no longer ignore the problem of consciousness. This course will compare old and new research programmes to study consciousness to determine whether this new science can avoid repeating history.


APD3238 H




APD3238 H




APD3238 H




APD3238 H

Because of the presence on this campus of Dr. Jens Brockmeier as Diefenbaker Fellow, we will jointly host an advanced seminar on conceptions of language using both historical and developmental sources.


APD3238 H

This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of key issues in using technology- mediated instruction.


APD3238 H

An analysis of the changing role of knowledge in contemporary society, and the implications for education.


APD3238 H

This course will provide a supervised experience in conducting psychotherapy with adolescents and adults. A particular focus will be clients with learning disabilities. While the approach to therapy will depend on the needs of the client, approaches emphasizing personal exploration will be emphasized, including person- centered and psychodynamically-oriented systems. Supervision will emphasize problem formulation, psychotherapy technique, and transference and countertransference issues. Students should have prior relevant training and experience.


APD3238 H

In this course we shall examine the role of emotions in social interaction. We shall use theoretical approaches from cognitive science, and review findings in a range of areas that will include: emotional biases in temperament, emotions and socialization in family interaction and at school, the functions of emotions in childhood and adult relationships of cooperation, support, and conflict, and emotions in adult sexual relationships. In addition to considering the influence of emotions on ordinary relationships, we will review emotionality in child and adult psychopathology as they affect social interaction, and are affected by social contexts. We aim to develop a theory of how emotions provide structure for relationships, guide interactions, and form some of the sinews of society.


APD3238 H

This course is a conceptual introduction to multivariate analyses with a heavy emphasis on using SPSS. Students will be walked through technical aspects of multivariate analysis. This course will build upon the student’s knowledge of multi-factor ANOVA, repeated measures/nested designs, and ANCOVA. This course will focus on the multivariate analogues of these designs and will include topics such as MANOVA/MANCOVA (between-groups, repeated measures), contrast analysis and post hoc tests, underlying assumptions and effects of violating assumptions.


APD3238 H

This research seminar will address the effectiveness of current models of language intervention for children and adults with severe communication disorders due to developmental exceptionalities (e.g. developmental delay, autism, deafness, etc.). A range of intervention models will be considered, including directive- and student-centred models, as well as the use of augmentative and alternative communication systems. Pragmatic and social-emotional outcomes will be highlighted.


APD3238 H

Over the last two decades a continuously increasing research literature in psychology and other human sciences has addressed the importance of narrative for the cognitive (as well as social, emotional, and cultural) organization of the mind. At the same time, narrative has been investigated as a particular mode of thought - as a form and structure of experience, memory, consciousness, and other areas of the mind traditionally being considered to realize important cognitive functions. The purpose of this course is to make participants familiar with the theoretical, empirical, and methodological concepts and models fundamental to the understanding of this new field of research. The focus will be on approaches that aim to examine both the cognitive potentials of narrative and the narrative fabric of the mind.


APD3238 H

An advanced seminar focusing on the theory and practice of using item response theory (IRT) models to develop educational and psychological assessments. Permission of instructor.


APD3238 H

An examination of how emotional processes in the brain influence cognition and behaviour, and how that influence lays down the structure of personality over the early years of life. .


APD3238 H

Description as for HDP 1238.


APD3238 H

Deception is a pervasive human behaviour. It serves both adaptive and maladaptive functions for interpersonal interaction. In this course, we will explore the philosophical issues related to deception, the phenomenology of human deception, its biological basis, and most importantly the ontogeny of deception in children as well as the practical implications of empirical research on deception and its development in educational, legal, and clinical contexts. By permission of instructor only.


APD3238 H

This course reviews the latest approaches in multilevel modelling that are applicable to the analysis of complex family data. Within family differences in children’s development are most appropriately analysed using multilevel modelling. Students will test family theory using complex statistical techniques. Students are expected to have access to a dataset that is suitable for analysis in a family framework. Prerequisites for this course include Multilevel Modelling in Social Scientific and Educational Research (HDP 3227) and Developmental Psychopathology (HDP 1236). Students are expected to be well versed in multilevel modelling, the literature on families and developmental psychopathology and have published in the family research domain.


APD3238 Y

This course considers the psychological foundations of teacher education in general and initial teacher education in particular. It examines research-based evidence of what teachers should learn and be able to do, and looks at the intentional contribution that psychology can make in cultivating these competencies through effective pedagogical and curriculum design. Students will learn about the key ideas and concepts within the apprenticeship setting of a professional learning community. Authentic application and extensive practice opportunities will come by way of students’ membership on the core instructional team that is responsible for delivering the psychology requirement in the OISE initial teacher education program.


APD3238 H

This graduate seminar will provide an opportunity to review the theory and research that has emerged in the area of positive psychology that is related to child and adolescent resiliency development. Focus will be on the educational and other human service interventions that promote and sustain resiliency. Students will be encourage to apply this perspective to the conceptualization and design of their own research and the research of other seminar participants. By permission of instructor


APD3238 H

This course is designed for doctoral students who are engaged in mixed-methods approaches to the study of adolescent social cognition. We will examine the conceptual and empirical rationales for a range of established techniques for the assessment of constructs such as social perspective taking, moral reasoning, self-understanding, and belief identification. Specific methodological strategies under discussion will include the use of social vignettes or dilemmas, semi-structured interviewing, and narrative techniques, and varying approaches to the interpretive analysis of the data elicited by each. In addition, the course will provide an opportunity for students to work collaboratively to address the challenges of their own research projects. Pre-requisites: HDP3205 Social and Moral Development (or the equivalent), HDP1288 Intermediate Statistics and Research Design, and CTL1842 Mixed-Methods Research in Education: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Inquiries. By permission of instructor


APD3238 H

We will be examining and discussing the concept of "keystone skill"; those skills that when taught to children produce much broader positive effects than the specific behaviours being taught. By focusing on keystone skills, clinicians, parents and teachers can often make much more expansive and efficient changes in child behaviour than through the more traditional strategy of setting up contingencies around each individual target behaviour. We will discuss the conceptual underpinnings of the "keystone approach", its pros and cons, and contrast it to the standard approach utilizing functional analysis and intervention designed around specific


APD3238 H

The focus of this course is on what makes for good quality child care conceptually and how those constructs can be measured. Developmental theories that apply to early childhood care and education settings will be examined. Research on what makes for good quality care will be considered and gaps in our knowledge will be identified and discussed. This is a PhD level course. Breadth of knowledge about early child development is required. Permission of instructor required.


APD3238 H

This course focuses on prevention and intervention in the area of reading and writing difficulties and disabilities and has both a classroom-based and a practicum component. In class, students critically review research-based interventions to meet specific programming needs for children and adolescents who have serious reading and writing difficulties. The practicum component involves implementing a theory-based remediation (with students of all ages) and consultation with teachers and parents. The course is intended to be useful in the training of psychometrists/psychologists. Note: This course is normally limited to students in School and Clinical Child Psychology. Permission of the instructor is required. Pre-requisites: HDP1218 and HDP1219 or equivalent.


APD3238 H

In this course an overview will be presented of the most important aspects of early intervention including types of clinical interventions, the development of the infant and young child, and ways to assess and observe the child, parent-child interactions and other aspects of the environment which may impact on the developmental outcome of the child. Theoretical approaches from a transactional or ecological model will form the bases for the course and attachment, psychodynamic and other developmental theories will be considered as well. The contribution of these theories will be considered both in terms of the understanding of assessment of the child and family and in considering appropriate interventions strategies. Findings will be reviewed of evaluations of intervention programs and the efficacy of various interventions or therapeutic approaches. Research findings on the importance of various kinds of parent-child interventions for child development as well as the impact of parent, family and environmental influences on positive child outcomes or the development of psychopathology, will also be considered.


APD3238 H

Throughout this course we will explore how individuals with autism develop an understanding of themselves and of others across the life span. In the beginning, we will review the diagnostic presentation of children with high-functioning autism. Throughout the course we will examine topics, such as the development of emotionl understanding, theory of mind, self-concept, self-awareness, and understanding relationships. One of the course's main foci will be exploring the unique socio-emotional needs of children with high-functioning autism. Factors underlying the high comorbidity between autism and mental health problems (e.g., anxiety and depression) will be examined.Within this context, the course will explore how to conduct a comprehensive assessment of (high-functioning) autism, how to approach the task of differential diagnosis, and how to assess mental health issues in children with autism in a clinically meaninghful way. Unfortunately, within our current mental health system and developmental disability service sector, there is a lack of comprehensive services for individuals with a dual diagnosis of autism and mental health. This course will explore the services that are available for children with high-functioning autism and co-morbid mental health problems. An overarching goal of this course will be to exolore how clinicians can develop and adapt individual (e.g., CBT; play therapy; psycho-therapy) and family therapy approaches, as well as school-based interventions, when addressing mental health needs in children with high-functioning autism.


APD3238 H

This course will provide students with access to ten of the world's most important thinkers in the world. Interviews of these experts will take place; annotated bibliographies for each expert will be developed and related written and electronic material will be contributing to the creation of an "electronic book" produced by the professors and students. Students will act as "interview producers" preparing all the necessary background research and questions required for each interview and students will also lead on-line video conferencing seminars. To provide cohort students with policy leadership from some the world’s most respected experts To provide students with opportunity to provide leadership through production and research support for interviews of each expert and to lead a seminar To produce an organic electronic book comprised of one hour interviews of all experts, an annotated bibliography for each expert, edited discussions of students for each seminar informed by the video interview and selected clips that illustrate practical examples of experts’ views To provide a preliminary relationship-building exercise with key international leaders with a view towards developing a multi-national flex PhD program for the Fall of 2013


APD3238 H

In this course, students will develop advanced skillls for intervening to address emotional and behavioural problems in children and youth. Students will provide therapy to children, adolescents and families at OISE's Psychoeducational and Counselling Clinic. Class time will be used for individual and group supervision of the clinical work, as well as for educational seminars on advanced intervention issues such as complications in the use of empirically-validated treatement methods, considerations for culturally and lingusitically diverse clients, and implications of current research and theory on integrative methods of psychotheraphy.


APD3238 H

This course combines an overview of qualitative analysis in mixed-methods applied research and in-depth examination of particular qualitative methods in case study examples of current or proposed research studies. Course will be offered on-line or in a blended approach combining on-line and face-to-face classes.


APD3238 H

The goal of this course is to provide students with the essential knowledge and skills to conduct all stages of the research process using qualitative, quantitative and mixed-methods approaches. The topics discussed in this course include formulation of research questions, working with the literature, research design and design of the data collection instruments, methods of data collection, quantitative and qualitative data analysis, interpretation of the results and report writing. At the end of this course students should be able to: -Better understand their own research interests and orientations -Conduct efficient literature search and review -Critically evaluate published research reports using the indicators of good research -Develop understanding of various methodological designs -Identify different sampling strategies and understand their benefits and disadvantages -Develop skills in selection and design of data collection instruments -Understand approaches to qualitative and quantitative analyses of empirical data -Gain practical knowledge and skills in interpretation and reporting of research results -Learn how to prepare and execute a feasible research project


APD3238 H

This seminar course will explore the self-perceptions, peer relations, and parent-child interactions of children and youth with disabilities with a focus on ADHD and learning disabilities. Students will read about normal child and adolescent development in these areas, and theories and research that purport to explain why children and youth with disabilities have altered self-perceptions, and often experience challenging relationships with their peers and families.


APD3238 H

Students will develop full thesis proposal including first three chapters of their thesis in rough draft form, a draft ethics review form, ensure internal consistency among research question(s) and research


APD3238 H

This course focuses on theoretical issues and practical approaches associated with assessing the language development of school-aged students who learn English as a second or an additional language in K-12 curriculum learning contexts. These school-aged students represent various groups of language learners, including immigrant children, indigenous language-speaking students, and second- or third-generation children who enter the school with fluent oral proficiency but with limited literacy skills in a language used as the medium of instruction at school. Students in both Master’s and Doctoral programs whose research interest and professional work are related to these populations may benefit from taking this course. In this course, students will engage in discussions about the complexity of assessment and tension arising from the multiple roles educators are asked to play in assessing language learners. Students are expected to develop assessment competencies required to develop the ability to design, implement, and critically evaluate assessment.


APD3238 H

Cognitive diagnostic assessment (CDA) is a relatively new measurement approach to assess specific knowledge structures and processing skills that students have mastered in order to provide diagnostic feedback about their strengths and weaknesses. The CDA approach combines theories of cognition of interest with statistical models intended to make inferences about students’ mastery of tested skills. This is a doctoral-level seminar course. In this course, we will focus on cognitive theories underlying diagnostic assessment design, the construction of cognitively rich items, psychometric models used to estimate skill profiles, and the use of skill profiles in the context of teaching and learning. Throughout the course, we will discuss philosophical, theoretical, practical issues concerning diagnostic assessment and modeling focusing on what makes the CDA approach distinct from other approaches.


APD3238 H

This course will involve an exploration of contemporary issues concerning literacy development in second language learners, with a particular emphasis on immigrant students. The course will explore cognitive (within-child), developmental, contextual, and instructional frameworks that are important to consider with regard to literacy development in L2 contexts. Theoretical frameworks focusing on universal and language specific considerations and on child development will be explored. Approaches to the study of “transfer” and their applications will be examined, including the effect of spoken and written language typologies and inter- language transfer. Factors that enhance L2 learning or that place L2 learners at risk will be examined, as will be instructional, diagnostic, and intervention issues concerning the intersection of L2 learning and learning disabilities. A discussion of advanced relevant methodological and statistical approaches will be integrated.


APD3238 H

This is the introductory course for the Phd. (flex-time) program in Early Learning. This experience is designed to ensure that the students in the cohort become a “learning community” that enables individual progress throughout the program through group support and the expertise and experience that each student brings to the group. Key to the study of early learning and related issues is the interplay of research, practice and policy and the cross-cutting importance of equity and dealing effectively with diversity.


APD3238 H

This course will provide an overview of assessment and treatment issues relevant to domestic violence, child emotional, physical and sexual abuse and child neglect. We will begin with a consideration of the incidence and impact of family violence. We will then cover a variety of interventions including PCITT, ITTM, Caring Dads, Partner programs. Also included will be a review of the systems in which children and families affected by family violence are involved including the education, legal, police and child protection systems.


APD3240 H

This practicum course introduces the student to the work of clinical assessment. Questionnaire and projective tests are used to assist in developing a picture of the emotional experience and the social environment of the child/adolescent. These factors are integrated with measures of cognitive ability and academic skill development to obtain an overview of psychological functioning. This half-credit course is scheduled on alternate weeks for the academic year. Open to School and Clinical Child Psychology students only. Prerequisites: HDP1216 or equivalent and HDP1218 or equivalent and permission of the instructor.


APD3241 H

This course supports and monitors the development of the Ph.D. students' clinical skills (assessment and intervention) in the field placement. Placements are typically in clinical settings. Seminars are scheduled on alternate weeks for the academic year. They focus on issues related to diagnosis, intervention and clinical practice. Note: Open only to School and Clinical Child Psychology students. Students are expected to consult with Dr. Link to arrange their practicum placement in the year prior to taking this course or as soon as they are accepted into the program. Pre-requisite: 1218 or equivalent and permission of the instructor.


APD3242 Y

This is a 1600 hour placement completed in the third or fourth year of doctoral study. Pre-requisites: HDP3241H and permission of instructor.


APD3243 H

This optional practicum course is an additional practicum course that is available to School and Clinical Child Psychology (SCCP) program students at the PhD level. Students take it as an optional course beyond their program requirements. The course exists entirely to support students’ development of their clinical skills. Students may register in this course any time that they commence a field placement experience under the supervision of a registered psychologist, providing that the placement is unpaid. Students may register in this course multiple times to permit a broad variety of assessment, intervention and supervisory experiences. Students may register for this course only with the permission of the course instructor. There are three restrictions on enrollment: 1) There is a signed agreement between the supervisor and the students with regard to the new skills that the student will acquire. 2) For each registration, the student must remain in the placement for a minimum of 100 hours to ensure that the supervisor has had ample time to observe and evaluate. 3) The total of clinical hours accrued in this open practicum course must not exceed 500 hours


APD3252 H

Description as for HDP2252.


APD3253 H

Description as for AEC1252.


APD3255 H

The aim of this course is to introduce students to family therapy concepts and interventions for use in the practice of school and clinical child psychology. Structural, strategic, narrative and transgenerational models are considered through discussion of readings, videotape analysis and practical exercises.


APD3258 H

A course designed to permit the study (in a formal class setting) of a specific area of Counselling Psychology not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session timetables.


APD3258 H

This course will present a critical examination of current theories and etiological perspectives on psychopathology. Students will be expected to acquire an in-depth understanding and knowledge of the defining characteristics of major clinical/psychological disorders as well as current diagnostic systems and practices.


APD3258 H

The Early Stages of the Oedepies Complex. In this Part modifications of the Oedepies theory, its object relations, and development will be presented. Melanie Klein's Psychoanalytic Technique with children and adults will be discussed.


APD3258 H

This course covers Melanie Klein's development of the Depressive Position with an emphasis on understanding the object relations of this position, its main anxieties, emotional development and main psychological defence mechanisms. Case examples involving depressive reactions, manic defences, and


APD3258 H

The goal of this seminar is to facilitate the research process of students who conduct thesis work on topics which examine the relationships between body and culture and the impact of these relationships on self and body experience as well as on body practices. The course, hence, focuses on research that is located at the intersection of psychology and sociology.


APD3260 H

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding and working knowledge of the defining characteristics of major clinical/psychological disorders as well as current diagnostic systems and practices. Students will develop skills in synthesizing clinical material and formulating/making differential diagnoses based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders (DSM-IV-TR). The course will also provide some opportunity to critically examine current theories and etiological perspectives on psychopathology with attention to gender and cultural issues. The course material will include video recordings for illustration of diagnostic issues and clinical syndromes as well as for practice purposes. [For Ph.D. students in Counselling Psychology only.]


APD3268 Y

This course requires the completion of at least 2000 hours of internship under the supervision of a registered psychologist. Students will register in the course once the placement has been arranged and approved by the course instructor. Placements are generally expected to fulfil the criteria of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centres (APPIC). The internships may be served in a variety of settings and will normally involve instruction in psychopathology, training in differential diagnosis and assessment, case conceptualisation, treatment planning, a variety of psychotherapeutic approaches, case management, and other related tasks. All students must have a formal diagnosis and assessment component as part of their internship hours. It is expected that students will involve themselves in such activities as diagnosis and assessment, case conceptualisation, treatment planning, psychological interventions, consultations with other professionals, report writing, case conferences, and other activities relevant to professional training. It is also generally expected that, where possible, students will have contact with clients reflecting a range of diversity (e.g., clients who derive from various cultural, ethnic, social or linguistic groups and/or who bring other types of minority issues, such a gender identity or disability). Students are expected to find placements at training sites accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) or the American Psychological Association (APA), or equivalent. Note: For Ph.D. students in Counselling Psychology only.


APD3269 H

This course will familiarise doctoral students with current issues and debates concerning the theory and practice of counselling and psychotherapy in a multicultural society. The course seeks to define, redefine and locate multicultural counselling and psychotherapy research within the broader economic, social and political contexts of health care provision and practices (particularly in Canada). Through a post-colonial critique of psychiatry, clinical and counselling psychology, psychoanalysis, psychotherapy and counselling, the course attempts to raise questions regarding the theory, practice and research with ethnic minority clients. The course also offers a critical examination of the concepts of multicultural, multiethnic, cross-cultural, inter- cultural and other nomenclatures, particularly assessing the epistemological and ontological histories and complexities in relation to psychological frames of thinking and feeling. Particular emphasis will be given to understanding the relationship of qualitative and quantitative research in this field. The course will also respond to significant developments within the wider context of ‘discourses of the other’, for example, feminist research methods, research and class, disability and sexual orientation will form part of the discussion in seminars. The course is appropriate for students considering a dissertation proposal in multicultural counselling and psychotherapy. A weekly seminar will focus on research methods and methodologies, the design and structure of the research, sampling procedures, ethical issues, empirical constraints and production of new knowledge/s. Students will review, analyse and redesign representative studies in multicultural counselling literature which will eventually lead to a doctoral thesis proposal.


APD3270 H

All students completing an Ed.D. in Counselling Psychology for Community Settings will be required to complete the doctoral internship course. This course requires the completion of at least 500 hours of internship under the supervision of an experienced psychotherapist or counsellor approved by the Counselling Psychology Internship Coordinator. Ed.D. students in the Counselling Program have been completing this 500-hour internship requirement since the inception of this program. We wish to ensure that the completion of this requirement appears on the student’s transcript as a completed course requirement. Students will register in the course once the placement has been arranged and approved by the course instructor. The internship may be accomplished on either a full-time or part-time basis. The internships may be served in a variety of settings and will normally involve case conceptualisation, treatment planning, counselling interventions, consultations with other professionals, report writing, case conferences, and other activities relevant to professional training. It is also generally expected that, where possible, students will have contact with clients reflecting a range of diversity (e.g., clients who derive from various cultural, ethnic, social or linguistic groups and/or who bring other types of diversity issues, such a gender identity or disability).


APD3271 H

This optional practicum course is an additional practicum course that is available to Counselling Psychology (CP) program students at the PhD or EdD level. Students take it as an optional course beyond their program requirements. The course exists entirely to support students’ development of their clinical skills. PhD students may register in this course any time that they commence a field placement experience under the supervision of a registered psychologist, providing that the placement is unpaid. Similarly EdD students may register in this course any time that they commence a field placement experience under the supervision of an appropriately trained professional psychotherapist, providing that the placement is unpaid. Students may register in this course multiple times to permit a broad variety of assessment, intervention and supervisory experiences. Students may register for this course only with the permission of the course instructor. There are three restrictions on enrollment: 1) There is a signed agreement between the supervisor and the student with regard to the new skills that the student will acquire. 2) For each registration, the student must remain in the placement for a minimum of 100 hours to ensure that the supervisor has had ample time to observe and evaluate. 3) The total of clinical hours accrued in each registration in this open practicum course will not normally exceed 500 hours.


APD3272 H

(*Parallel course to DPE Research Pro-seminar on Human Development and Applied Psychology - HDP 3200H). This introductory course aims to provide students with the importance of the dynamic relationship among and between research, practice and policy while surveying the developmental psychology literature and the role of formal education in early human development. Attention will also be paid to the importance of evidence-based leadership and communications in the process of impacting public policy.


APD3273 H

(*Course meets the requirements for DPE Research Methods course with content tailored to Early Learning). The course will provide students with the essential knowledge and skills to conduct all stages of the research process using qualitative, quantitative and mixed-methods approaches. The topics discussed in this course include formulation of research questions, working with the literature, research design and design of the data collection instruments, methods of data collection, quantitative and qualitative data analysis, interpretation of the results and report writing.


APD3274 H

(*Parallel course to DPE Research Methods and Doctoral Thesis Preparation in APHD – HDP 3226H). Building on the research methods course, this course will support students in developing a rough draft outline of the first three chapters of their theses. It will enable students to gain a broader understanding of various research methods/data analysis; coherent to the thesis development with clear alignment of the over-arching research question, sub questions, methodology(ies), results and analysis. It will also provide students initial understanding of related materials including the ethical review process and formation of thesis committees. NOTE: Students who have previously taken HDP3226H are not allowed to take this course. Open to students in the PhD flexible time program in DPE. By permission of instructor.


APD3275 H

Available to non-cohort DPE PhD students with permission from Instructor). This course will provide access to some of the most important thinkers in the world. Interviews of these experts will take place; annotated bibliographies for each expert will be developed; and related written and electronic material will be contributing to the ongoing development of an "electronic book" produced by the professors and students. Students will act as "interview producers" preparing all the necessary background research and questions required for each interview. Students will also lead online video conferencing seminars.


APD3286 H

In this course we will focus on brain systems involved in human emotion and self-regulation and track their development from birth to adulthood. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which experience modifies corticolimbic systems, leading to the consolidation of individual differences in temperament and personality. We will then explore the implications of these processes for atypical development and developmental psychopathology.


APD3297 H

This course will focus on current knowledge of various low incidence disorders (those typically represented in one percent of the population or less), especially conditions that are first diagnosed in infancy or childhood. We will discuss both biological and psychological factors playing a role in the etiology and discuss characteristic profiles for specific disorders. We will also consider potential interventions for prevention and treatment of the various disorders. Disorders to be considered include (but are not limited to) mental retardation, autistic disorder, Rett's disorder, Asperger's disorder, tic disorders, selective mutism, pica, enuresis, stereotypy and feeding disorders. For covering course material, the problem-based learning model


APD5284 Y

The purpose of this course is to explore, from a multidimensional perspective, assessment and intervention issues and techniques arising when learners in second language or multicultural contexts experience learning difficulties. Through readings, classroom discussion, case studies, and client-work, the course is intended to help students become better aware and better prepared for work with individuals in culturally and linguistically diverse settings. Students are expected to integrate and apply such diverse areas as second language acquisition, learning disabilities, cognitive and affective functioning, and to consider alternative assessment and intervention practices. Note: Open to doctoral students in School and Clinical Child Psychology only; others by permission of


CIE1001 H

This course serves as the basic core course for the Institute's graduate studies concentration in comparative, international, and development education. It focuses upon the various theoretical conceptions of the socioeconomic development process and the role of formal and non-formal educational programs within that process. The basic purposes of the course are to introduce students to the comparative literature regarding education in advanced and developing nations, to evaluate the various ways in which comparative data may be used, and to examine the relative utility of various theoretical perspectives for understanding formal and non-formal educational policy problems common to many societies. CIDE students only or by permission of instructor.


CIE1002 H

Supervised experience in an organizational setting related to comparative, international, and development education, under the direction of a CIDE faculty and a professional mentor. The practicum will include not fewer than 40 hours of field placement over a period of one semester. There will be three assignments: 1) Development of a proposal that includes main learning goals, identification of a field site, and selection of a field based mentor; 2) Completion of the practicum itself (40 hours of on-sight work); 3) A final "portfolio" assignment that should include some combination of a short reflection paper on knowledge gained during the practicum, and evidence of any work completed during the practicum itself. The practicum is intended to provide students with practical experience and an opportunity to apply skills and knowledge gained from participation in the Comparative, International and Development Education Collaborative program. Arrangements for the practicum placement and selection of a CIDE supervisor are the responsibility of the individual student. The course will be open to students who have completed the core CIDE course, CIE 1001, and at least one other CIDE course. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL6797 are prohibited from taking this course.


CIE1005 H

International projects and programs to support the development of education initiatives at preschool, primary, secondary, tertiary, nonformal/adult education levels are often funded by national governments, nongovernmental organizations, universities, foundations, and international aid agencies. Effective participation in the design, planning, implementation and management of these projects can benefit from knowledge, competencies and skills in the growing discipline of project and program management. This course will cover the body of knowledge of project and program management as defined by the Project Management Institute (PMI), the leading international organization in the field. The course will include specific units on the key knowledge areas and processes of project and program management with a particular focus on the challenge of managing culturally diverse project teams in widely dispersed locations and time zones. The course will also address the links between strategic planning in education, and the development of related projects and programs to implement the strategies, as well as the leadership attributes necessary to ensure projects' and programs' success.


CIE1005 H

This course will be a special topics course on particular issues of interest to students studying international, comparative and development education. It will offer an opportunity for CIDE faculty to pilot courses that may become part of the regular course offerings of the CIDE collaborative degree. It will also offer an opportunity for visiting scholars and fellows to offer a course on a specialized field of study in the area of


CIE1005 H

Gender issues and gendered practices in education have global relevance and have received sustained scholarly and policy interest in northern and southern societies, as well as in the work of major international organizations such as the World Bank, the OECD, and various United Nations’ agencies, bilateral donors, and transnational civil society organizations. This course will provide students with an opportunity to critically and comparatively explore different theoretical (e.g., feminist, womanist, Women in Development, Women and Development, Gender and Development, social change, education etc.) and discursive frameworks (e.g., human capital, human rights, human capabilities), policies and practices (e.g., Education for All, United Nations Girls’ Education Initiative, affirmative action, single-­-sex education initiatives, feminist pedagogy etc.) that have constituted and shaped the broad and interdisciplinary field of gender and education over the last century. Given that the emphasis in this course is on “gender” as a socially constructed, performed, and contested identity(s), we will critically and comparatively investigate the educational opportunities, experiences and outcomes for girls, boys, women and men, from early childhood to adulthood. Critical attention will also be given to the intersections of gender, race, class, age, and sexual orientation (among other categories of social difference) in relation to educational access, survival, output, and outcomes.


CIE1006 H

The course aims to: (i) Explore national and Transnational Perspectives on Democracy, Human Rights and Democratic Education in an Era of Globalization drawing on experience and scholarship; (ii) Provide opportunities for in depth engagement both with leading scholars acting as faculty and with students from other universities; and (iii) Build global professional networks among students and faculty. Students are expected to: (i) Engage with key concepts relevant to democratic education such as: democracy, citizenship, human rights, antiracism, discrimination, equalities; (ii) Interrogate transnational research and scholarship on Transnational Perspectives on Democracy, Human Rights and Democratic Education in an Era of Globalization, using a variety of perspectives including sociology, political science and pedagogy; (iii) Critically evaluate and compare different national and international approaches to democratic citizenship education; (iv) Apply understandings of democracy and human rights to educational contexts; and (v) Develop and implement policies and programs for democratic education. Based on a seminar mode, each school of education will suggest a number of faculty/professor as guest speakers in the area broadly defined as Transnational Perspectives on Democracy, Human Rights and Democratic Education in an Era of Globalization. From the pool of the professors, the U of T course director and collaborating faculty from of the other two institutions will select 3 to 4 guest speakers for the course on each offering. This course will be offered on-line to ensure synchronous delivery and participation of students across three different time zones: Toronto, London and Melbourne, each of the 12 sessions will take 2 hours only without break. At OISE, the classes will start from 4-6pm (until November 2) and from 3-5pm (after November 2); In London, UK and Melbourne their times will be adjusted accordingly. Each guest speaker will be offering a brief lecture up to 45 minutes highlighting key issues around the topic of their scholarship. The rest of the class will be based on various forms of critical dialog and discussion (individual, group and whole class active learning activities). The speakers will also provide 2 to 3 readings (one from their publications and two from other scholars’ works), which will be distributed prior to the session and will be available on the online forum. Based on the primacy of dialogue, each topic/session is expected to ensure that the participants’ personal knowledge, the readings, and the instructors’ knowledge are brought into synthesized and integrated learning outcomes. Instructional variety (seminars, pair/group discussions, lectures, guest speakers, Video-recordings) and intellectual challenge are the key elements in the course’s pedagogy. In addition, reflection, cooperative learning, inclusive classroom ethos, critical thinking, social skills development, a culture of encouragement, and reciprocal sharing and learning are a must for each session.


CTL1000 H

Ce cours fait partie des cours requis pour l'obtention de la maîtrise. Il est également requis pour les étudiant(e)s du doctorat du programme CSTD ne l'ayant pas complété plus tôt pendant leur programme de maîtrise. Le but de ce cours est d'appliquer la théorie et la recherche à l'étude des programmes d'enseignement. Le cours (1) fournit un langage propice à la conceptualisation ; (2) examine les principaux thèmes traités dans la littérature ; (3) fournit un cadre qui porte à réfléchir aux changements à apporter aux programmes d'enseignement ; et (4) aide les étudiant(e)s à développer un esprit critique et analytique approprié à la discussion des problèmes rencontrés dans les programmes d'enseignement.


CTL1000 H

This is a required course for master's students (and doctoral students who did not take it in their masters programs). The aim of this course is to apply theory and research to the study of curriculum and teaching. The course (a) provides a language for conceptualizing educational questions; (b) reviews the major themes in the literature; © provides a framework for thinking about curriculum changes and change; and (d) assists students in developing critical and analytical skills appropriate to the scholarly discussion of curriculum and teaching problems.


CTL1002 H

This course defines and illustrates methods for completing important curriculum development tasks such as (a) identifying appropriate course and unit objectives; (b) developing useful growth schemes; (c) developing effective teaching techniques; and (d) constructing practical assessment strategies. Particular attention will be given to problem-solving skills.


CTL1007 H

This course theorizes and operationalizes teacher development in a social and cultural structure: teacher book clubs. The course organizes teacher book clubs as communities of learners to socially and interdependently explore the construction of knowledge and relational learning, the related concept of communities of learners and, narrative as an heuristic for making sense and developing meaning. By integrating the three theoretical orientations, the course seeks to help teachers more fully understand how they learn, think, and develop their professional knowledge and identity. The class is organized into book clubs so that the collective membership, through their own practices and theorizing, develop a praxis for including communities of learners in school settings.


CTL1011 H

In this course we will identify ways that systems of oppression and oppressive educational practices manifest themselves in school settings - for example, within interactions between teachers and students; administrators and students; students and students; students and the curriculum; teachers and the curriculum; administrators and teachers; teachers and parents; parents and administrators - and we will discuss how we can use these spaces or locate new ones to do anti-oppressive educational work in school settings. Emphasis in the course will be placed on integrating anti-oppresive educational theory with anti-oppressive educational practice. We will attempt to link our discussions of practice to theory and our discussions of theory to practice. Note: Students who have taken CTL7009H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1011 H

Ce cours identifiera comment les systèmes d’oppression et les pratiques éducatives oppressives se manifestent au sein des milieux scolaires – par exemple, dans les interactions entre personnel enseignant et élèves, personnel administratif et personnel enseignant, élèves et élèves, élèves et le programme scolaire, le personnel enseignant et le programme scolaire, le personnel enseignant et les parents, les parents et le personnel administratif – et nous abordons comment nous pouvons nous servir de ces espaces ou en créer des nouveaux par le biais des pratiques éducatives axées sur l’anti-oppression. Nous tenterons de lier nos discussions de la pratique à la théorie et nos discussions de la théorie à la pratique. Le cours abordera des stratégies d’anti-oppression liées à la différence sociale en milieu scolaire, notamment le genre, la classe sociale, la race, l’identité sexuelle, l’âge, l’handicap, la langue, la nationalité et d’autres distinctions qui influent sur la participation des acteurs scolaires et leur approche à la participation.


CTL1012 H

This course will examine how appropriate curriculum for the education of girls and young women has been defined and delivered in Canadian schools.


CTL1014 H

This course serves as an introduction to the strategies and techniques utilized in the evaluation of curriculum programs. The focus will be on the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses associated with various strategies. Students will work through evaluation problems associated with particular curriculum programs and instructional techniques.


CTL1016 H

This course provides for practical experience of as well as understanding of innovative practices in cooperative learning (CL). We explore rationales for and current developments (synergy, shared leadership). Topics include: What is CL (principles, attributes); how to organize CL (structures and strategies); how does CL work (basic elements, types of groups); teacher and student roles; benefits (positive interdependence, individual accountability, social skills, cohesion); evaluation (forms and criteria); obstacles and problems; starting and applying CL in your classroom (teachers' practical knowledge; collegiality; parental involvement); independent learning and collaborative inquiry; Ministry and Board requirements; and resources and materials Group (response trios) projects and joint seminars.


CTL1018 H

Experiential learning for students new to qualitative inquiry is provided through a broad introduction to qualitative approaches from beginning to end. A range of approaches relating to students' theoretical frameworks are explored. Thesis students are encouraged to pilot their thesis research.


CTL1019 H

In this course candidates will formulate a personal policy on student assessment, develop authentic assessment tools appropriate to their teaching assignments, and assess the quality of authentic assessment strategies. Particular attention will be given to performance assessments, portfolios, self-evaluation, cooperative assessment, student beliefs and attitudes toward assessment, measurement of affective outcomes and professional standards for evaluating student assessment practices.


CTL1020 H

This course will critically analyze a number of curriculum models and will explore instructional strategies currently used to program for high ability students in a variety of learning environments. Specific reference will be made to program differentiation within a regular classroom setting. Previous courses in the education of high ability students is not required.


CTL1024 H

This course will examine the foundations of educational thought from the perspectives of Jacques Derrida, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Luce Irigaray, Hélène Cixous, Michel Foucault, Roland Barthes, Gilles Deleuze, Julia Kristeva, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jean Baudrillard. Educational implications and applications of poststructural philosophy will be stressed in relation to the discursive and non-discursive limits of the scene of


CTL1026 H

A critical review of current approaches to analysing teaching and an examination of theoretical literature on the concept of teaching. The course involves reflection on one's own teaching. Students should be currently teaching or have access to a teaching situation. This course is most suitable for primary and secondary teachers.


CTL1027 H

Reflective practice is one means through which practitioners make site-based decisions and through which they continue to learn in their professions. This course will critically examine the research and professional literature concerning the meaning of and the processes involved in reflective practice. Additionally, as professional development is often associated with reflective practice, the course will also identify and examine professional development strategies which could facilitate reflective professional development. Students will critique these models by utilizing the concepts from the reflective practice literature. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL4001H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1028 H

This course concerns observing and giving feedback to teachers; it is experiential and requires that students be able to observe and work with a colleague who is currently teaching. The focus is on developing the skills of in-depth, systematic analysis of classroom teaching and the skills of sensitive, informed, one-to-one feedback. The course is particularly relevant to those with supervisory or professional development responsibilities. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL4002H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1029 H

This course critically examines the various conceptual and structural approaches to teacher education, including an inquiry-based, transformative orientation. Participants engage in their own inquiries, exploring the ways in which they construct professional knowledge in their own lives, and in which other professionals in transition participate in their professional development. Theoretical perspectives, research metholologies and research findings are discussed for the purposes of deepening our understandings of our current teaching and research practices, and of engaging in the ongoing construction and reconstruction of professional knowledge.


CTL1031 H

The literary text is used as a vehicle for reflection on issues of language and ethnic identity maintenance and for allowing students an opportunity to live vicariously in other ethnocultural worlds. The focus is on autobiographical narrative within diversity as a means to our understanding of the "self" in relation to the "other". The course examines the complex implications of understanding teacher development as autobiographical/biographical text. We then extend this epistemological investigation into more broadly conceived notions of meaning-making that incorporate aesthetic and moral dimensions within the multicultural/anti-racist/anti-bias teacher educational enterprise. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL4007 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1032 H

This course examines how knowledge is developed, explores the relationships among different kinds of knowledge (e.g., moral, scientific, religious, aesthetic), and identifies the various philosophical bases of such school subjects as English, history, and math. It examines the relationship between issues about knowing and issues about teaching. For example, the questions of what and how we should teach are addressed from the standpoint of different kinds of "knowing." The course is oriented toward secondary school but is not confined to any particular subject-matter specialty. It is not assumed that students will have a background in philosophy.


CTL1033 H

This course will focus on the dynamics of multiculturalism within the individual classroom and their implications for teacher development. It is intended to examine how teachers can prepare themselves in a more fundamental way to reflect on their underlying personal attitudes toward the multicultural micro-society of their classrooms. Discussions will be concerned with the interaction between personal life histories and the shaping of assumptions about the teaching-learning experience, especially in the multicultural context. The course will have a "hands-on" component, where students (whether practising teachers or teacher/researchers) will have the opportunity to become participant-observers and reflect upon issues of cultural and linguistic diversity within the classroom.


CTL1036 H

This course will explore the view that teachers are "thoughtful practitioners", the primary agents of schooling. It will focus on the empowerment of teachers through school-based inquiry and through a more adequate understanding of the teacher's abilities and role. A small research study in a teaching context (school or preservice) will be required in this course. Assistance will be given in research methodology for the study. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL4012 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1037 H

In this course we explore differences in the ways "Knowledge", "Teaching", and "Learning" are constructed and understood in different cultures, and how these affect how teachers learn and promote learning, with particular emphasis on multicultural settings. An underlying theme is how one can best bring together a) narrative, and b) comparative/structural ways of knowing in order to better understand teacher development in varying cultural/national contexts. The choice of particular nations/regions/cultures on which to focus in the course responds to the experience and interest of the students and the availability of useful literature regarding a particular geo-cultural area with respect to the basic themes of the course. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL4013 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1038 H

This course examines the nature of educational change and its impact on the implementation of curriculum. How change affects teachers and how new curricula affect classroom practice, form the central focus of the course. Three basic approaches to implementation, the fidelity perspective, mutual adaptation, and curriculum enactment, are used as a framework to examine the research on implementation and identify factors which enhance and hinder successful change efforts. The role of professional development and strategies for effective professional development practices in support of implementation constitute the third


CTL1040 H

This course is organized around the various components of program planning and evaluation for education and the osicla and health sciences; needs, evaluability, process, implementation, outcome, impact, and efficiency assessments. Data collection methods such as the survey, focus group interview and observation are introduced.


CTL1041 H

L’objectif général de ce cours est de développer chez les étudiantes et les étudiants les outils qui faciliteront la lecture critique de la recherche empirique en éducation. Les concepts de base, les méthodes et les problèmes pertinents à la recherche seront abordés en fonction des thèmes suivants: les étapes d'un processus de recherche, la formulation d'hypothèses, la conception et l'élaboration des instruments de recherche, les méthodes de cueillette de données, l'interprétation des résultats et la rédaction de rapports de


CTL1041 H

Basic concepts, methods, and problems in educational research are considered: discovering the periodicals in one's field, steps in the research process, developing research questions, design of instruments, methods of data collection and analysis, interpreting results, and writing research reports. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL2007H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1042 H

An overview of the kinds of instruments used for collecting educational data: classroom tests and various item types; norm-referenced and criterion-referenced standardized achievement tests; group intelligence and aptitude tests; attitude and self-report scales; observational systems, including performance assessment and classroom observation; questionnaires and surveys; interview protocols; reliability theory and item anlysis; and validity. The course will focus on selection criteria for commercially available instruments, and on criteria for use in refining researcher-designed instruments. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL2009 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1043 H

A review of research and issues in using alternative assessments in classroom and accountability testing, in competency testing and quality assurance, and in program evaluation, for education and the social and health sciences. These alternative assessments include performance, authentic, portfolio, self, peer, group, and indivdualized assessments. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL2010 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1045 H

The course studies survey research design and questionnaire development. Topics include single and multiple waves research designs, sampling strategies, data collection methods (mail, telephone, computer administered, and individual and group interviews), non-response issues, questionnaire construction and validation, and sources of errors in self-reporting. Course content relating to the use of questionnaire as a form of data collection applies to research designs other than survey research. Teaching and learning will be conducted through reading, lecturing, class and internet discussion, and take-home and in class individual or small group


CTL1046 H

This course studies methods of evaluating training. Topics covered by the course include training models, practice analysis, Kirkpatrick’s 4 level training outcome evaluation model and its variants, Return on Investment (ROI) analysis, and measurement and design issues in training evaluation.


CTL1047 H

This course examines the concept of self-assessment and its relationship to learning and other psychological constructs, construction and validation of self-assessment measures, psychometric properties of self- assessment, how learners assess their learning, and how teachers and professionals in social and health services assess the quality and effects of their practices. The course emphasizes practice as well as theory and research. Some of the topics include methods of self-assessment, cognitive processes, psychometric issues and sources of bias in self-assessment, correlates of self-assessment, learner self-assessment, and


CTL1048 H

Working within a broad discussion of methodology and the problems of theory and praxis particular to a ‘global’, postmodern, and neoliberal era, this course invites students to work through methodological dilemmas, choices and experiments within the context of their own research projects and in conversation with a variety of qualitative methodologists. Readings will propose critical, creative, and collaborative solutions to a range of contemporary qualitative methodology concerns in the field of education today. In particular, the problematics of gender and race, the impact of neoliberal politics on workers and learners, the tensions of local and global, the competing epistemologies of art and science, structural and post- structural, the ethical relations between researchers and research participants, the challenges of ‘representation’, the struggles over claims to truth are some of the subjects to be addressed in the discussion of research design and methodology.


CTL1060 H

This course examines the linkages between education, both formal and non-formal, and the social development of nations, with particular focus on the process of educational policy formation for both developing nations and developing sub-areas within richer nations. The course aims to acquaint students with the main competing "theories" or conceptualizations of the development process and, through examination of a representative set of recent empirical studies and "state of the art" papers, to develop an understanding of the relationships between educational activities and programs and various aspects of social development, with an overall focus on problems of social inequality. The overarching objective is to help develop a better understanding of how, in confronting a particular educational policy problem, one's own theoretical preconceptions, data about the particular jurisdiction, and comparative data about the problem at hand interact to produce a policy judgment. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL6002 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1062 H

This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn about the arts-based research methods of performed ethnography and research-informed theatre. Performed ethnography, also known as performance ethnography and ethnodrama, involves turning the findings of ethnographic research into a play script that can be read aloud by a group of participants or performed before audiences. Performed ethnography can be seen as one kind of research-informed theatre. Other examples of research-informed theatre we will look at in this course include autobiographical theatre, community theatre, verbatim theatre, documentary theatre, tribunal theatre and history theatre. Note: Students who have taken CTL1799H Special Topics: Performed Ethnography and Research Informed Theatre are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1063 H

Taking as a starting point a conception of pedagogy that centres relational encounters, this course seeks to consider the question of how to enter into relationships with others that seek to transform the very terms that define such relationships. The course explores how theconcept of solidarity has been used to both explain the nature of social relationships between groups and individuals, as well as how it has been mobilized as a strategy for political work. In both counts, solidarity plays a key pedagogical role because it seeks to either sustain or challenge particular social arrangements. The course takes education and educational experience as a particular site for thinking through solidarity as both explanation and strategy, and considers a range of educational situations, including the classroom, to consider the complexities of solidarity as ethical encounters in pedagogical relations.


CTL1064 H

Applied theatre is a growing field of pedagogy and research in the educational landscape. This course will examine the research of, and different approaches to, applied and socially engaged theatre. Practitioners engaged in forms of applied theatre, such as drama in education, theatre for development, Verbatim theatre, participatory theatre etc. often believe creating and witnessing theatrical events can make a difference to the way people interact with one another and with the world at large. The ‘social turn’ in theatre is understood politically, artistically, and educationally to be in the service of social change, although there is certainly no single nor consistent ideological position that supports the expansive use of theatre in classrooms and communities. Theatre has been consistently used in formal and informal educational settings as a way to galvanize participation and make learning more relational, or more a student/participant-centred rather than teacher/facilitator- centred proposition. In addition to exploring the educational value of applied theatre in a range of contexts and through a variety of interventions and intentions, the course will also contemplate the ethics and poetics of representation in performance and in research.


CTL1065 H

This course will focus on matters of equity, inclusion, and school reform as these pertain to differences of sexual orientation and gender identity among students in elementary and secondary schools. Course content and instruction will focus on understanding and addressing educational and schooling issues confronting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and queer (LGBTQ) students. It will also explore strategies and resources for challenging homophobia, heterosexism, and transphobia in classrooms and schools. We will examine the ways homophobia, heterosexism, and transphobia intersect with multiple identities, other forms of oppression and our history of white settler colonialism. We will also examine curriculum materials and community support services that promote sensitivity, visibility and social justice.


CTL1099 H

This course examines how creative practices can be employed to generate innovative research in the hunanities and social sciences. Course participants will analyze current debates on representation, rationale, and ethics, and in particular they will examine how arts-based practices/processes can move educational research towards more critical, democratic, and participatory forms of research by attending to issures of


CTL1104 H

The examination of current topics or problems in play, drama, and arts education as related to curriculum studies. Issues will be identified from all age levels of education as well as from dramatic play, each of the arts disciplines, and aesthetic education as a whole. Students will address one specific topic through self- directed learning and present the results in an appropriate form. Topics vary from year to year depending upon interests of course members.


CTL1105 H

The course examines a variety of narrative and arts-based approaches to research and professional practices. Narrative is explored both as a fundamental form of experience and as a collection of methods used for the study of experience. Course participants will engage in narrative, self-study research, in the review of completed narrative and arts-based theses and dissertations, and in the creation of practical


CTL1106 H

This course examines the nature of spirituality. After exploring various conceptions of spirituality the course then examines how it can be part of the school curriculum in a non threatening manner. More specifically, the course explores the nature of the soul and how the soul can be nourished in the classroom through approaches such as imagery, dreams, journal writing, and forms of contemplation. The arts and earth education are also examined in this context. Finally the role of the teacher will be explored.


CTL1110 H

This course will focus on curriculum that facilitates personal growth and social change. Various programs and techniques that reflect a holistic orientation will be analysed: for example, Waldorf education, social action programs, and transpersonal techniques such as visualization and the use of imagery in the classroom. The philosophical, psychological, and social context of the holistic curriculum will also be examined.


CTL1115 H

The course will focus on teacher education and the construction of professional knoweldge in teaching from holisitc perspectives. Beginning with an exploration of the various conceptual and structural alternatives to initial teacher education, the course then examines holistic, arts-based and narrative orientations to learning to teach and to career-long teacher learning. The connections between professional renewal, curriculum and school renewal, and educational research are explored.


CTL1116 H

This course is designed for elementary school teachers interested in experiencing math teaching as a creative and deeply satisfying endeavour. Through class discussions, reflection activities, creative group investigations, selected readings and a final (usually classroom-based) project, participants will be able to explore topics from among the following: holistic math learning environments; linking math with real life; creative problem-solving; open-ended problems; integrating math with other disciplines such as fine arts, social studies and language arts; journal writing, use of children's literature and oral communication activities; authentic assessment; linking assessment with instruction.


CTL1119 H

It has been well documented that many adults experience mathematics anxiety, possibly due to the traditional way they have been taught math in their own schooling. This course utilizes a holistic approach in helping elementary teachers to reconstruct their foundational math knowledge and overcome their anxieties. Utilizing reform-based approaches, participants will work in small groups on selected mathematics problems and hands-on explorations at an appropriate level of difficulty. Journal writing, group reflection and guided visualization activities will be used to help participants become aware of, and start dealing with their emotional and cognitive blocks in relation to mathematics. Such work opens the door to accessing one's mathematical intuition and creativity. A discussion of how the strategies used in the course, or reported in the literature, can be adapted for mathematics-anxious students will also be included.


CTL1202 H

This course examines what mathematics should be taught, how to define and increase students’ understanding of mathematics, classroom discourse and student engagement in elementary mathematics. The intent of the course is to provide a gounding in mathematics education.


CTL1206 H

This course involves a study of theories of learning in the context of science education, a survey of research relating to children's understanding of concepts in science, and an exploration of strategies for more effective science teaching.


CTL1207 H

A detailed study of issues in the history, philosophy, and sociology of science that have significance for science education, an examination of the philosophy underpinning the STS movement, and a consideration of some of the theoretical and practical problems surrounding the implementation of science curricula intended to focus on environmental, socioeconomic, cultural, and moral-ethical issues.


CTL1208 H

This course aims to illuminate contemporary international debate in science and technology education and to provide some insight into the nature of curriculum change through a critical analysis of episodes in science curriculum history.


CTL1209 H

The course focuses on the design of effective strategies for exploring students' personal frameworks of meaning in science and addresses issues of contemporary international debate about science and technology education, including the "Science for All" movement, the "new" psychology of learning, the language of science and technology education, politicization of science and technology education, the role of laboratory work, computers in science education, and issues in environmental and health education.


CTL1211 H

This is an active research-based course in which participants will sharpen and develop their understanding of issues and professional practice in science, mathematics and technology education. Working within a mutually supportive group of practitioners, they will subject their current practice (e.g., teaching) to critical scrutiny and appraisal, plan and attempt alternative curriculum perspectives and practices, and evaluate these in action (e.g., in teaching). The particular focus for research will be determined by individuals or groups of individuals in the course, in consultation with the instructor. Class members need to be active in their work - e.g., currently working as a teacher, consultant, etc. - in order to carry out their projects. This course may be best taken after a few courses in a Masters level program, which may provide students with some theoretical perspectives to use in their action research. Although prior research experience would be helpful, it is not a


CTL1212 H

This course will address some key issues in the philosophy and the sociology of science and their implications for science education at the elementary and secondary levels. Attention will also be directed towards (i) a critical appraisal of the role of the history of science in science education , and (ii) a consideration of pseudosciences and their role, and the distortion and misuse of science for sociopolitical goals. Course members will have the opportunity to explore ways in which lab work, computer-mediated learning, language activities and historical case studies can be used to present a more authentic view of science, scientific development and scientific practice.


CTL1214 H

This course deals with issues of gender bias, Eurocentrism and other forms of bias and distortion in science and science-technology education. It seeks a generalized approach to equity issues and examines ways in which border crossings into the subcultures of science and science education can be eased for all those who currently experience difficulties.


CTL1215 H

This course will focus on theoretical and practical perspectives and current research on teaching and learning science and technology in school and non-school settings. Consideration will be given to classroom environments, as well as science centres, zoos, aquaria, museums, out-door centres, botanical gardens, science fairs, science hobby clubs, and media experiences. In particular, the course will focus on the nature of teaching and learning in these diverse settings, representations of science and technology, scientific and technological literacy, and socio-cultural interpretations of science and technology.


CTL1216 H

This course will focus on the role of the teacher leader in developing the teacher as learner in the context of science, mathematics and technology education. Topics will include the nature of teacher's work, the construction of teacher's knowledge, forms of teacher inquiry and reflection, providing feedback on teaching and the social organizational conditions of schools, which support teacher leadership and learning. During the course, participants will be required to interview a colleague, and to arrange access to a classroom or instructional setting to conduct some action research on their own leadership by observing and providing feedback to another teacher, instructor, or colleague.


CTL1217 H

This course focuses on curriculum issues associated with integrating school science, mathematics and technology. Participants will examine the contemporary literature on curriculum integration. Topics include the history of curriculum integration and school subjects, theoretical and practical models for integration, strategies for teaching in an integrated fashion, student learning in integrated school settings, models for school organization, and curriculum implementation issues. During the course, participants will be required to interview a colleague, and to arrange access to a classroom or instructional setting to conduct some action research on their own integrated teaching practices.


CTL1218 H

This course explores the fundamentally cultural nature of all learning, but specifically learning of mathematics, science, and technology disciplines. The course is roughly split into three major sections. We begin with a brief overview of cultural-historical approaches to understanding learning and cognition. These theoretical frameworks begin with the assumption that cognition is fundamentally social and cultural, always grounded in activity, practices and communities. Secondly, we will focus on empirical research on mathematical, scientific and technological thinking in various contexts, ranging from elementary school mathematics classes to grocery shopping to carpet laying to theoretical physics. Finally, using the theoretical and empirical work as a foundation, we will study approaches to instruction based on the assumption that all learning is cultural.


CTL1219 H

Various approaches to making mathematics meaningful for, and accessible to intermediate and senior level students will be examined in the light of recent developments in the field and the Ontario mathematics curriculum guidelines. Throughout the course, we will focus on the question ‘making mathematics meaningful for whom,’ so an equity focus will pervade each week’s readings and discussions. Topics may include: Streaming and school structures, the use of open-ended problems, identity issues, building on community knowledge, classroom discourse, and assessment.


CTL1220 H

This course is an introduction to sociocultural theories of learning, including both historical and contemporary views on how culture, society and history influence the nature of learning. We will begin with Vygotsky and activity theory, and then consider a broad spectrum of current views that draw on this work.


CTL1221 H

The role of science education in positively impacting life conditions globally is perhaps the most intriguing and urgent problem for science education. In this regard, a recurring theme in local and international deliberations on science education is the role of school science in social, economic, and cultural conditions, that is, in everyday life. This course will facilitate a systematic analysis of the role of school science in everyday life along five themes: The context for the issues that pertain to science education and social economic development; Emergent constructs for school science; How people learn and knowledge transfer; The realities of science teaching and learning; The notion of knowledge, school science, other sciences, and social economic development; and, Historical reflections and critique of the science education endeavor.


CTL1222 H

In this course we will explore teaching and learning about environmental education (EE) through science, mathematics and technology education. Environmental education is a particularly timely topic given the recent changes to the Ontario curriculum and the renewed interest in environmental issues nationally and internationally. Central to this course is a commitment to a teaching and learning continuum that includes the use of schools, school grounds, the local and broader community, and outdoor education centres. All of these 'places' become contexts in which educators can explore environmental education. In this course, we will attempt to link our discussions to the theory and practice of EE education. Specifically, we will examine the notion of environmental literacy and citizenship, current changes in Ontario curriculum and policy, the relationship between EE and nature, sustainable development and social justice, place-based education, outdoor education, and EE Indigenous knowledge. The course also examines the philosophical and ideological orientations and competing frameworks that underpin the EE movement in Canada and elsewhere, and identifies some of the theoretical and practical problems surrounding its implementation. This course can be offered through face to face or on-line delivery (or a hybrid).


CTL1302 H

This course is an introduction to the study of contemporary media and their relation to educational practice. The approach will be a critical one, analysing the overall cultural formation promoted by contemporary media as well as exploring their implications for schooling - in particular, how they impinge upon the social relations of the classroom. Part of the course will therefore include a look at both specific media practices (newspaper press, advertising, television, rock videos) and practical curricular strategies that respond to them. The emphasis is on understanding the media as powerfully educative forms in their own right, as well as having complex relationships with official school knowledges.


CTL1304 H

La notion de « culture » provient de plusieurs disciplines depuis le début du 20e siècle. Les « études culturelles » représentent une synthèse récente et une re-évaluation critique de quelques unes ces approches, en faisant surtout ressortir les retombées pour les professionnels de l'éducation dans le domaine des sciences humaines. Le cours abordera les enjeux générés au sein de cette tradition, surtout en reprenant des textes clés, incluant les médias populaires, les films et les vidéos de langue française, pour examiner les versions structuralistes, ethnographiques, féministes et postmodernes des études culturelles afin de mieux cerner comment ces approches reformulent une pratique enseignante en ce qui se concerne de la culture


CTL1304 H

The study and concept of "culture" has emerged from a number of different disciplines over the past century. "Cultural studies" is a recent synthesis and critical re-evaluation of some of these approaches, one with important implications for educators in the area of the humanities. Through a discussion of key texts and issues generated within this tradition, the course examines struc- turalist, ethnographic, feminist, and postmodern versions of cultural studies in order to understand how these approaches reformulate an educational practice concerned with contemporary culture.


CTL1306 H

The course is designed to introduce students to qualitative methods of research in education. The intention is to examine the nature of qualitative research and its relationship to theory. Students will look at different ways of approaching qualitative research, and special attention will be paid to the concept of critical ethnography. Students will also study five specific research techniques: observation, interview, content analysis, life history, and action research.


CTL1306 H

Le cours a pour but d'initier les étudiantes et les étudiants à l'analyse qualitative dans le domaine de la recherche en éducation. Le premier objectif du cours est de se pencher sur la nature même de la recherche qualitative et sa relation avec la théorie. Différentes façons de concevoir la recherche qualitative seront donc examinées. Dans un deuxième temps, les étudiantes et les étudiants se familiariseront avec cinq techniques de cueillette de données: l'observation, l'entrevue, l'analyse de contenu, le récit de vie et la recherche-action.


CTL1307 H

Le cours a pour but de se pencher sur le rôle de l’école de langue française dans le processus de construction identitaire des élèves. Dans le contexte du cours, l’identité est conçue comme étant le résultat d’une construction sociale. Des concepts-clés tels que l’identité, l’ethnicité, la race, la culture, la langue et l’assimilation sont d’abord examinés. Par la suite, le cours se penche sur les politiques et les programmes existants dans les écoles de langue française en Ontario, dans le but de faire une analyse critique de la contribution de ces dernières au processus de construction identitaire des élèves.


CTL1307 H

The course is designed to examine the contradictory role of the school as an agent of linguistic and social reproduction in a school system where students are from diverse linguistic and cultural origins. In this context, the majority-minorities dichotomy will be critically examined. The course will focus particularly on how school contributes to the students’ identity construction process. In this critical examination, identity will be understood as a socially constructed notion. Key-concepts such as identity, ethnicity, minority, race, culture and language will be first analyzed. The process of identity construction will then be examined within the educational context of Ontario.


CTL1309 H

Le cours veut permettre aux étudiantes et aux étudiants de comprendre comment l'école, par ses programmes, son matériel scolaire et son personnel enseignant, contribue à reproduire les rapports d'inégalités qui s'établissent entre les hommes et les femmes dans la société. L'analyse s'intéressera au rôle de l'école en tant qu'agent de socialisation ainsi qu'aux efforts gouvernementaux en matière d'égalité entre les sexes. Par la suite, une analyse de contenu du matériel scolaire utilisé dans les écoles de langue française de l'Ontario


CTL1312 H

Preparation for ‘democracy’ and citizenship is ostensibly a central goal of public education: What does this citizenship imply, who is heard in ‘public’ decision making, and how might active democratic citizenship be ‘taught’ and learned? Diverse individuals, cultures, and nations understand democracy in different ways, and political space is gendered: This course examines contrasting understandings of and approaches to political (governance), social (inclusivity), and transnational (peacebuilding) citizenship, democratization, and citizenship education, drawn from comparative international and Canadian research and cases, especially in school settings. Themes include conflict and controversy, critique, cultural/ gender/ sexual diversities, human rights, justice, development and peacebuilding. Emphasis is given to curriculum, conflict management, and governance in public elementary and secondary schools in various cultural contexts. Participants will learn to analyze and assess educational experiences, in light of theory, research, and their own democratic citizenship education goals.


CTL1313 H

This course is designed for practising educators to develop and enhance their knowledge of how gender is produced in our educational system. It examines the different stages of the educational system: elementary, secondary, community college and university. The classroom is the focus because it is the central work setting of educational institutions. What happens in the classroom is not simply the result of what a teacher does but involves interactions between and among students and between teachers and students. The classroom has its own dynamic and is also interconnected to outside relationships with parents, friends, educational officials etc. The course has as its main objectives to examine the dynamics of inequality in the classroom and to discuss and develop strategies for change. While the primary focus is on gender inequality, course readings also draw on resources that make visible the intersections of gender with other inequalities based on race, class and sexual orientation.


CTL1318 H

This seminar examines how young people may be taught (and given opportunities), implicitly or explicitly, to handle interpersonal and social conflict. The course examines the ways conflict may be confronted, silenced, transformed, or resolved in school knowledge, pedagogy, hidden curriculum, peacemaking and peacebuilding programs, governance, discipline, restorative justice, and social relations, from Canadian and international/ comparative perspectives. The focus is to become aware of a range of choices and to analyze how various practices and lessons about conflict fit in (and challenge) the regular activities and assumptions of curriculum and schooling, and their implications for democracy, justice, and social exclusion/ inclusion. Participants will become skilled in analyzing the conflict and relational learning opportunities and dilemmas embedded in various institutional patterns or initiatives to teach or facilitate conflict resolution and transformation and to prevent violence.


CTL1319 H

This course present and examines various international and comparative perspectives on religious education within and across Buddhist, Christian, Hinda, Islamist, and Jewish faith communities. We will critically and comparatively engage in the policies, practices, and research on religious education in public and faith-based schools in Canada and internationally. No previous knowledge or prerequisites in religious education is necessary.


CTL1402 H

In today’s heterogeneous classrooms, teachers diversify their techniques of teaching, the content of lessons and their systems for evaluating student progress. The greater pupil diversity, the more teachers must adapt instruction. In this course, we will examine adaptive instruction at a macro(teaching methods) and micro- level (student-teacher interaction). Questions to be examined: What are the teacher’s responsibilities for adapting instruction? What is an adapted or modified program? Is differential instruction of students discriminatory or essential? How might modified outcomes be evaluated and reported.


CTL1405 H

This course presents an overview of education and schooling before the massive intervention of the modern state. It is concerned with those forms of educational communication that formed the background for contemporary educational systems. Note: Students who have previously taken HSJ1400 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1406 H

Why is the North American school system as it is? What were the options for change and what are the options for change? Drawing chiefly on North American scholarly literature, this course explores the origins of the state mandated educational systems in the context of traditional patterns of socialization and formal schooling, and changing social, political, and economic conditions. Note: Students who have previously completed HSJ1401 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1407 H

This course is directed at those students interested in exploring the deep connections between education and social change in Canadian history. Before 1941, the majority of Canadian families lived outside of cities. This course will examine institutional structures, popular responses, and community involvement, and the ways that these factors interacted as state-run compulsory schooling was slowly accepted. It invites students to explore the vital, but relatively unknown, relationship that existed between education, social protest, and the search for reform in rural Canada in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings in this course will allow students to explore the ways that various people, kinds of people, and organizations, both rural and urban – First Peoples; recent British, African, and eastern European immigrants; educational bureaucrats and revolutionaries; social reformers; settled farm families and itinerant miners – used various kinds of education to encourage, resist and direct social reform in rural Canada. Note: Students who have completed HSJ1404 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1408 H

This course is primarily designed for those with little or no background in historical research. It examines a variety of ways in which cinema is relevant to the study of education and contemporary society. Students will be introduced to the interpretive questions of evaluation, representation, and understanding. Note: Students who have previously taken HSJ1405H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1423 H

This course is directed at those students who want a deeper historical understanding of the changing relationship between one of Canada’s oldest institutions - the family - and the growth of the modern world in general, and the educational state in particular. Although Canadians usually associate the family with the personal and private aspects of their lives, the institution of the family has also been at the centre of Canada’s economic, political and cultural structures for hundreds of years. This course will examine the changing and varied relations among many different kinds of parents, children, and the larger social formations within which they lived, with particular emphasis on the dynamic, often vexed, relationship between schooling and family life in the wider contexts of Canadian history. NOTE: Students who have previously taken HSJ1423H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1424 H

This course provides an examination of how faith groups, often at odds with one another or the state, have shaped and continue to shape the Canadian school system, its organization, curriculum, and culture. Note: Students who have previously taken HSJ1424H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1426 H

This course explores the changing dimensions of gender relations in Canada from the late 18th to the 20th century. It will examine selected social, cultural, economic, and political developments, shifting meanings of femininity and masculinity in these developments, and their effect on formal and informal forms of education.


CTL1427 H

This course will examine historical literature that looks at the different ways in which historical commemorations and historical memory have been forged, the hegemonic meanings of the past created by elites, and the contestation of those meanings by those often formally excluded from these processes: women, members of ethnic and racialized groups, and the working classes. We will look at areas such as state commemorations and the creation of 'tradition', the development of museums, historical tourism, and the designation of monuments and battlefields as sites of national memory. The course will conclude with an exploration of current debates over the place of 'history' in the schools and universities. NOTE: Students who previously took TPS/1461/HSJ1427 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1428 H

This course explores how immigration and immigration policy have shaped and continue to shape the Canadian social, economic, political, and linguistic reality with special reference to education. As schools are a primary place of encounter between immigrants and the Canadian receiving society, the class will examine the often-differing agenda of immigrants and educators hoping to meet the needs of immigrants and their children.


CTL1429 H

This course explores issues of ethnic and racial identity as factors influencing Canadian civic culture and the educational system in particular. Special attention will be paid to the changing nature of ethnicity in Canda and the social, linguistic, economicand political challenges ethnic and racial identity represent to keepers of the Canadian gate and educators in particular. NOTE: Students who have taken HSJ1429 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1430 H

This course explores the ways in which gender relations have been an integral part of colonial and imperial expansion and national identitites, from the mid-18th to the mid-20th centuries. We examine both how gender relations helped structure these historical developments and how gender relations were subject to change in various colonial contexts (including 'settler societies' such as Canada). The course readings explore the uneven and historically contingent ways in which processes of colonial and national expansion created new forms of gender asymmetry in both colony and metropole. Note: Students who have previously taken HSJ1430H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1448 H

This course examines a range of themes in the history of education and popular culture, drawn primarily from nineteenth and twentieth-century Canadian history. Topics that will be covered include the impact of popular forms of amusement and education: theatre, tourism, public parades and festivals, and commercial exhibitions and museums. We also will explore the relationship of various levels of the state and of capitalism to popular culture and the relation of "high" culture to mass culture. This course will pay attention to the influences of gender, race and ethnicity, class, and sexuality in shaping and, at times, challenging, particular forms of popular culture. Note: Students who have previously taken TPS/1448H/HSJ1448H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1454 H

Canadians, like other peoples around the world, have witnessed a breakdown in consensus about what history should be taught in shcools, and a heightened awareness of the political nature of deciding whose history is, or should be, taught. Debates about what to teach, and how, are appearing as strands within larger discussions about the social and political meaning and purposes of history, and 'historical consciousness' is emerging in a wide range of cultural activities, from visiting museums to watching the History Channel. Adults and children alike seem to be seeking answers to questions of identity, meaning, community and nation in their study of the past. Students in this course will explore through readings and seminar discussions some of the complex meanings that our society gives to historical knowledge, with particular emphasis on the current debates about history teaching in Canadian schools, and the political and ethical issues involved. This course was previously listed under TPS1461 - "Special Topics in History: History Wars: Issues in Canadian History Education". Note: Students who have previously taken HSJ1454H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1460 H

A seminar course required of all M.Ed. students in History of Education, normally taken at or near the beginning of each student's program. The course will both explore selected topics in educational history with special reference to historical research methods in use in the history of education and assist students in undertaking their major research paper. Note: Students who have previously taken HSJ1460 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1602 H

An overview of the uses of computers in education and consideration of critical issues of those uses; recommended as a first course in this area. Current practice and research in the use of computers to guide instruction are examined. Includes aspects of computer-aided learning: computers in the schools, computer- managed instruction, computer assisted instruction, internet resources, computer mediated communication, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence applications. Specific topics change each year. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken early in the student’s program.


CTL1603 H

This course examines the role that knowledge building can play in school and work settings. We will review the distinction between knowledge building and learning, analyze recent knowledge building literature, and discuss socio-cultural, logistical and design considerations when constructing an online Knowledge Building community. Students will visit and study existing Knowledge Building communities as one of the course assignments.


CTL1606 H

This course deals with the use of computers in schools as tools for students in curricula other than computer studies. The role that technology can play in school restructuring is examined. Also included is a discussion of issues related to teacher training and classroom implementation, and the ways in which technology applications can influence the curriculum content and process. The major emphasis is on determining the specific educational needs (of students, teachers, etc.) that computers can meet.


CTL1608 H

This course will examine the theory and research that underlies constructivist learning and its historical and philosophical roots. The educational applications that have developed out of these ideas, like problem based learning, collaborative learning and knowledge building will be explored in regards to how such concepts can inform and enhance the design of online environments and methods of teaching. We will look at different learning environments, both research projects and applications current in the field that instantiate various elements of these ideas.


CTL1609 H

A survey of the use of computers for human communication for educational purposes. Applications and issues of teaching and learning in the online environment, related to all levels of education, are examined. The course is conducted via OISE/UT's computer conferencing system.


CTL1612 H

The Virtual Library is a seven module course addressing students' information retrieval needs in a rapidly- changing technological environment. The course covers hardware and software requirements; access to online catalogues, online databases; electronic journals and theses; educational resources on the World Wide Web; bibliographic software packages and the new requirements for citing electronic publications.


CTL1797 H

Supervised experience in an area of fieldwork, under the direction of faculty and field personnel.


CTL1798 H

Specialized, individual study, under the direction of a member of the teaching staff, focusing upon topics of particular interest to the student. Although credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic. A student wishing to enrol in CTL1798 is required to complete, in typewritten form, an Individual Reading and Research Course form, including an appropriate bibliography, describing the rationale and plan of study for the course. This course proposal must be signed by the student's faculty advisor and the instructor with whom the course will be taken, and then submitted for approval to the department's academic programs standing committee.


CTL1799 H

A course designed to permit the study of a specific area of curriculum or instruction not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. (This course does not fulfil the purpose of CTL1798, which in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning is normally conducted on a tutorial basis.)


CTL1799 H

Mega-sport events have significant impact on local communities while they are organized on a transitional, global scale. Modern sport developed as Western European imperial and colonial projects in the nineteenth century. The course examines how contemporary sporting mega-events, specifically the 2015 PanAm Games in Toronto, are ongoing forms of colonialism within the context of globalization. The course will introduce students to debates and issues related to the PanAm Games and other mega-sport events such as gentrification and poverty, indigenous sovereignty, branding and media, the sport-military complex, racism and neocolonialism, sexuality and homonationalism, gendered regulation and violence.


CTL1799 H

Writing is integral to education. This course examines writing as a holistic process operating within an eco- system of literacy, learning, creativity, and health. Participants will work through an overview of the most significant research perspectives on the nature and practice of the writing process as articulated in disciplines including composition, discourse, psychoanalytic, neuro-scientific, activity, and systems theories. We will furthermore seek new theoretical perspectives from which to consider writing. We will analyze these theoretical frameworks in relation to our own experiences as practitioners and instructors in order to refine the models that inform our practices. Our objective is to become theoretically-grounded and reflective


CTL1799 H

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of recent sociological research an thinking about schooling and schools as organizations and institutions, and to develop applications to educational policy and practice in Ontario. Particular attention will be given to the inclusion of international perspectives.


CTL1799 H

Interest in citizenship, pedagogy and school communities has escalated worldwide in recent years as teachers, policy-makers, and researchers attempt to understand the complex issues related to youth learning about democratic citizenship and the processes involved. For some, this dimension of education is viewed as an opportunity to begin preparing young people for their understanding of, and involvement in, the civic life of their community/communities, from the local to the global. For others, it is viewed as a way of responding to a range of existing social concerns (e.g. civic illiteracy among youth). This course explores contrasting characterizations of citizenship education pedagogy in Canada and elsewhere. Perspectives and practices communicated and exhibited in school communities are explored and analyzed. Particular attention is given to the ways in which teachers translate varying theoretical perspectives into pedagogical practice as they address such themes as informed citizenship, civic identity, civic literacy, controversial public issues, and community involvement.


CTL1799 H

It has been well documented that many adults, and particularly teachers, experience math anxiety, possibly due to the traditional way they have been taught math in their own childhood. This course offers a multifaceted approach for dealing with teachers' math anxiety, based on holistic education principles. It will include math work for improving competence, utilizing reform-based approaches, as well as strategies for dealing with the anxious feelings and gaining confidence as math learner and teacher. Guided by the instructor, participants will work in small groups or individually on selected math problems and activities at an appropriate level of difficulty. Various journal writing, group reflection, relaxation and guided visualization activities will be used in helping participants become aware of, and start dealing with their emotional and cognitive blocks in relation to math. Such work should allow participants to improve their attitudes toward math and open the door to accessing their mathematical intuition and creativity. A discussion of how the strategies used in the course, or reported in the literature, can be adapted for math-anxious school children will also be included.


CTL1799 H

This course considers how adolescents construct and express their selves through writing. We will explore a range of adolescent diaries and memoirs, from our core text, The Diary of Anne Frank, to Marjane Satrapi’s Perspolis (2003), the story of the author’s coming-of-age during the Iranian Revolution. If, as Madeleine Grumet maintains, the goal of education is to return the child to him/herself, then considering writing the “self” is a critical project of the English classroom. These diaries provide a remarkable entry-point into the psychological, sexual and moral concerns of adolescence as they are excellent vehicles for studying critical literacy. How do we bridge the public/private realms by bringing what has been traditionally practiced as private writing into the public and social space of the classroom?


CTL1799 H

This course deals with a theme that is prominent in science curricula in many parts of the world; that is, empirical activities associated with knowledge building, dissemination and use in the sciences (and in fields of technology/engineering). This ‘process’ is explored in light of important theoretical perspectives, including: constructivism, knowledge duality, semiotics, actor network theory, capital theory, metacognition, and critical theory. Purposes of such activities in fields of science and technology and in science and technology education also are examined.


CTL1799 H

This course is open to both Master's and Doctoral students. The course focuses on theory, research and practices in self-assessment as a form of self-reporting used by teachers, educators and health professionals to examine their own practices and effects, and by students or learners to examine both process and product of learning. Some of the topics include types of self-assessment, self-assessment methods, cognitive processes, psychometric issues and sources of bias in self-assessment, current policies regarding teachers' and health professionals' self-assessment practices for self-directed learning and quality assurance, self- assessment and classroom action research, self-assessment and the use of portfolios, and effects of self-


CTL1799 H

This course focuses on issues pertaining to relationships amongst: the global economy, science and technology and science technology education. Curricular and pedagogical perspectives and practices that may counter problematic aspects of such relationships are presented. In addition to whole class course activities, students are required to prepare a research -informed course paper with regard to a specific issue of their interest that was addressed in the course.


CTL1799 H

This course puts into a broader theoretical and political perspective the issues of systemic racism, racial inequality and minority underachievement that face educators in schools and universities in Canada.


CTL1799 H

This course explores recent trends and challenges (and responses to both) in social studies, history, and social sciences education. It focuses on philosophical and conceptual approaches, curriculum issues, and evolving teaching practices in social studies education. Examples will be drawn from the social studies curriculum of Ontario, other Canadian jurisdictions and also from international curricula. The course will appeal to students with a general interest in these topics as well as those interested in these subject areas at the elementary and secondary school levels.


CTL1799 H

This course introduces students to the main theories and concepts used in poststructural methodology in educational research, and provides them with the opportunity to review exemplars of poststructural research projects and to apply the ideas to their own research. The course begins by situating post-structuralism within qualitative paradigms of inquiry in education. Students will explore major concepts in poststructural research such as post-foundational knowledge(s); discourse; subjectivity; research positionality; reflexivity; and representation. Then the course proceeds by looking at exemplary studies in areas such as postcolonial and indigenous education; sexuality and gender; disability and body studies; media and sport studies.


CTL1799 H

This course will critically examine current research on instructional strategies and its implications on effective teaching practice in elementary mathematics education. Implementation and integration of instructional strategies such as graphic organizers, critical thinking models and cooperative learning in the teaching/learning process will be explored.


CTL1799 H

The course focuses on the use and development of case studies of teaching as vehicles for teacher development. The approach, sometimes called case methods, will be situated within the broader subject of teacher learning. Both theoretical and practical aspects of various kinds of case use wil be covered. Participants will work with pre-existing narrative and video cases and will collaboratively develop and critique cases of their own teaching from a variety of theoretical standpoints. The potential of cases as research


CTL1799 H

This course examines the role that knowledge building can play in online learning environments. We will review the distinction between knowledge building and learning, analyze recent knowledge building literature, and discuss socio-cultural, logistical and design considerations when constructing an online Knowledge Building community. Students will visit and study existing Knowledge Building communities as one of the course assignments.


CTL1799 H

In this course we aim to come to a better understanding of the functioning of teachers’ practical repertoires by telling and listening to stories of teaching and learning in a wide range of contexts, spanning different nationalities and cultures, different institutional settings of varying formalities (from primary school to university teaching; from regular classrooms to accounts of Holocaust survivors). Students will engage in narrative inquiry to explore their own teaching repertoires in order to gain awareness and increased personal choice over what is usually only tacitly understood.


CTL1799 H

The term 'collaboration' has become commonplace in current Ministry of Education documents, such as Learning for All (2009), and Growing Success (2010) and the Toronto District School Board's Vision of Hope (2010). But what is collaboration, and what form does it take in a school? How is it built, or destroyed? The course will compare delivery models in traditional school cultures and those in which staff work as a professional learning community. Case materials, both from documented conflicts and participants' experiences will be used to show how individuals (administrators, teachers, resource and support staff) engage in a collaborative problem solving to resolve staff conflicts about roles and responsibilities, and align their vision of service delivery in order to share a collective responsibility for their students. Shared tasks include preparing IEPs, concduction school team meetings, generating and sometimes co-teaching curriculum, and deploying resources such as EAs and Special Education personnel. An important role in collaboration features the students themselves.


CTL1799 H

The focus of this course is on the creation of effective learning environments and the use of advanced teaching strategies and techniques that are responsive to the diverse learning styles and needs of learners. The theoretical foundation and practical application of a variety of teaching approaches will be explored and critically assessed within the context of sound curriculum design principles and processes, and the literature.


CTL1799 H

The philosophical, psychological, and social context of the holistic educator will be examined. This course will focus on approaches that facilitate the development of the whole person in the context of professional development. Various approaches and techniques that facilitate this objective will be explored including meditation, imaging and metaphor.


CTL1799 H

In this class students will survey a range of issues related to the arts in education. The course will have a broad and interdisciplinary focus and introduce students to relevant frameworks for conceptualizing a wide range of artistic practices in various educational contexts. From a consideration of various rationales for the inclusion of the arts in general education to the educational experiences of artists themselves, the course will seek to bridge the distance between contemporary arts and cultural theory and the integration of the arts in education through curriculum implementation and research.


CTL1799 H

This course is designed to assist students who are engaged in developing their Major Research Papers or Master’s theses. Students will examine a variety of research paradigms and methodologies, considering the questions that each is able to address. The claims of and distinctions between qualitative and quantitative methods will be discussed, and the benefits of both explored. Each participant will be expected to develop one or more research questions, to locate the literature in which the questions are situated, and to design a method to address each question.


CTL1799 H

The focus of this course is on integrating multiple instructional methods in the design of learning environments. This implies connecting instruction to assessment, curriculum, how students learn, change, and systemic change. Course participants will also inquire into the foundations of key instructional approaches and how those approaches play out through positivist and constructivist philosophies.


CTL1799 H

This course will research and examine practices that promote literacy learning for students, ages 8-13. By examining new Ministry initiatives and current research in the field, participants will investigate techniques for organizing programs that builds literacy growth for all learners in junior and intermediate classrooms. A central theme of this course will address the issue of reading and boys. Other topics include: Considering Our Goals for Reading, Wrting and Talk: Encouraging and Assessing Student Writing: Towards an Understanding of the New Literacies and Encouraging Struggling Readers. Choosing and using fiction, non-fiction and poetry sources will be highlighted throughout the course.


CTL1799 H




CTL1799 H

This course explores curriculum problems that educators encounter. Philosophic perspectives in the literature and current realities in the classroom will be examined. Challenges with respect to access, quality and funding in education will be identified and analyzed. How these challenges impact curriculum development and implementation and the problems they create will be discussed, and creative problem-solving strategies generated. Philosophical, ethical, political, economic and practical issues will be explored.


CTL1799 H

This course will examine new approaches to literacy that are both critical and culturally inclusive, and that draw on digital technology and multi-media to make meaning across the K-12 curriculum. Literacies are viewed in the plural as socially constructed and influenced by social, economic, cultural, and power


CTL1799 H

This course will focus on peripatetic research across a wide range of disciplines and historical precedents including anthropology, geography, cultural studies, philosophy, education, and art. Through overlapping themes such as: footprints and lines, marches and processions, derives and psychogeography, forays and tangos, the course will critically analyze historical and current walking research intersected with a series of led “walks” in the city and beyond.


CTL1799 H

To reach a state of complete physical, social, and mental well-being, an individual or group must be able to identify and to realize aspirations, satisfy needs and to change or cope with the environment. Health is seen therefore as a resource for living not the object of living. Interest in health should be critical because it represents capacity for growth. This course examines the links between health and learning, the determinants of health, models of health promotion, and the methods and manners associated with creating and maintaining healthy learning environments, i.e., places where learners and opportunities for learning


CTL1799 H

Working within a broad discussion of methodology and the problems of theory and praxis particular to a 'global', postmodern, and neo-liberal era, this course will invite students to work through methodological dilemmas, choices and experiments within the context of their own research projects and in conversation with a variety of qualitative methodologists. Readings will propose critical, creative, and collaborative solutions to a range of contemporary qualitative methodology concerns in a field of education today. In particular, the problematics of gender and race, the impact of neoliberal politics on workers and learners, the tensions of local and global, the competing epistemologies of art and science, the ethical relations between researchers and research participants, the challenges of 'representation', the struggles over claims to truth are the subjects to be addressed in the discussion of research design and methodology.


CTL1799 H

This seminar will focus on the use of online computer simulations to present business, medical and legal education approaches to case based training. While we may examine simulations of physical systems if student interest warrants it, the major focus will be on social simulations, such as simulated patients, simulated business problems, or simulated classroom teaching problems. Students should have completed EDT1503/CTL1602 or equivalent.


CTL1799 H

This course is designed to encourage students to engage how issues of war and other forms of organized violence are represented in narrative cinema. We will consider film as a complex visual and political medium through which ideas and images of gender and race, culture and identity, history, nationalism and imperialism, etc. are not only reproduced but often critically challenged. Although this is not a course in film theory, we will be addressing issues of narration and representation, truth and fiction, the ethics of spectatorship, the politics of spectacle, and the value and limits of film as critical pedagogy. The course is structured as a combination of film screenings and assigned readings, including film reviews where possible. The first class of each week will be a film screening and the second class will be a discussion of the film and reading assignments. Although I have selected particular films in order to address specific topics and problems, films by nature contain overlapping narratives (as does war itself). Thus each film we view will address more than the issue in the readings assigned for that particular week. The object is to discuss the films and readings broadly, critically and creatively.


CTL1799 H

Educational assessments are an essential part of the instructional and learning process. Educational testing has become a major concern of educators as it is increasingly used as a tool to evaluate the quality of education. These tests-driven educational reform efforts have generated much controversy today. There is an increasing recognition of the need to rethink assessment practice and redirect its role to teaching and learning. This course critically examines the status quo of contemporary educational assessment and helps students to reconceptualize the use of assessment for improving instruction and learning in the classroom. The emphasis throughout the course is on the practical, yet critical issues of assessment in education, related to the following areas: (1) Public debate over testing and assessments; (2) Relation of assessment to instruction; (3) Purposes of classroom assessment; (4) Issues related to accommodating the needs of exceptional students; (5) Use and misuse of assessment; (6) Equity and fairness issues in assessment; and (7) Use of assessment for educational research. The course encourages students to integrate their knowledge of and experiences with specific subject domains (eg., math, science, language arts, or second language education) into classroom discussions and course projects.


CTL1799 H

This course will examine how religion has impacted the Canadian and particularly the Ontario classroom from the 1867 political compromise that allotted provinces authority over education and legally enshrined public funding from Catholic and public (Protestant in Quebec) schools through to today. Among the topics to be examined are: the tensions involved in teaching religion as opposed to teaching about religion, the public school system’s struggle to accommodate secularism on one hand and ‘non-traditional’ faith communities on the other, the growth of private confessional private schools and the response to demands from these schools for public funding.


CTL1799 H

This course will address the practices and consequences of public memory through the study of various ways a culture shapes and reshapes its images of the past. Emphasis will be placed on how different forms of collective remembrance may be understood as both pedagogical and memorial. A variety of practices are considered incuding: history texts, film and video, computer based multi-media monuments and museums, visual art, and poetry.


CTL1799 H

This course focuses on issues of race, ethnicity, language, poverty and wealth, power and difference, housing, health, services, district and provincial politics and policies, and their consequences for teaching and learning in urban schools. We interrogate these issues of space, curriculum, and pedagogy from intersectional perspectives that emphasize the interlocking nature of identities and oppressions. Too often gender and sexuality, (in terms of masculinities, femininities, the range of sexual identities and behaviours, and erotic desire) are cast aside or considered an addendum to race and class in urban education praxis, in particular teaching, research, writing, and policymaking. In this course gender and sexuality will always be theorized in relation to race, class, ability and other social categories. The course will also take into account the questions and problems that participants bring from their school and classroom practice.


CTL1799 H

Various approaches to making mathematics meanigful for, and accessible to intermediate and senior level students will be examined in the light of recent developments in the field and the new Ontario mathematics curriculum guidelines. Topics may include: Diverstiy and equity in secondary mathematics education, connecting mathematics to real life, increasing students' understanding of mathematics, group explorations, problem solving and mathematical modeling, communicating about mathematics, integrating the use of graphic calculators and computer technology, authentic assessment.


CTL1799 H

Various approaches to making mathematics meaningful for, and accessible to intermediate and senior level students will be examined in the light of recent developments in the field and the new Ontario mathematics curriculum guidelines. Topics may include: Diversity and equity in secondary mathematics education, connecting mathematics to real life, increasing students' understanding of mathematics, group explorations, problem solving and mathematical modeling, communicating about mathematics, integrating the use of grpahic calculators and computer technology, authentic assessment.


CTL1799 H

The course focuses on the social, economic and political environment of the greater urban Toronto area. We will discuss issues of race, ethnicity, language, poverty and wealth, power and difference, housing, health, services, urban district educational politics and policies and their consequences for teaching and learning. The course will take into account the questions and problems that participants bring from their school and


CTL1799 H

This seminar course is directed at Master’s students who, out of general, scholarly or professional interest want to have the opportunity to explore in detail the research-based theory behind the recent and potentially revolutionary changes (2013) in the Ontario high school history curriculum. They will also develop in this course some practical pedagogical strategies for implementing the new curriculum effectively in the classroom. The new Ontario history curriculum is rooted in recent international and Canadian history education research arguing that understanding history better means more than simply knowing more facts; it recognizes that historical understanding means knowing how and what historians do as they examine and interpret meaningful evidence left over from the past. A series of Historical Thinking Concepts (Evidence, Significance, Cause and Consequence, Continuity and Change, Historical Perspective and the Ethical Dimension) are about to become new and important benchmarks of knowing and understanding history in Ontario schools, and indeed in most provinces and territories in Canada. Students in the course will have the opportunity to combine theory and practice exploring Historical Thinking and the new curriculum.


CTL1799 H

This course addresses theories of writing instruction and assessment that influence current classroom practice. Connections between theory and practice will be explored in terms of what it means to be a writer and a teacher of writing. Issues such as teaching of writing conventions, formal and informal assessment of writing, sociocultural influences on students’ writing, and the teacher’s role in guiding student writing will be


CTL1799 H

This course examines the role of school leaders in supporting instructional reform. The first half of the course focuses on specific strategies that formal leaders (e.g., the principal) and peer leaders (e.g. exemplary teachers) can use to bring about school improvement. The framework for this portion of the course is change agent theory. The second half of the course examines theories of leadership through case studies. Vignettes depicting situations that provide opportunities for school improvement or which threaten continued progress will be analyzed through a series of theoretical lenses.


CTL1799 H

This course is directed at those students interested in exploring the deep connections between education and social reform in Canadian history. More particularly, it invites students to explore the vital, but relatively unknown, relationship that existed between education, social protest, and the search for reform in rural Canada in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings in this course will allow students to explore the ways that various people, kinds of people, and organizations, both rural and urban – First Nations people; recent British, African, and eastern European immigrants; educational bureaucrats and revolutionaries; urban and rural reformers; settled farm families and itinerant miners – used various kinds of education to encourage, resist and direct social reform in rural Canada. Students will have the opportunity to read, analyze and discuss a range of educational materials from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, as well as the work of recent historians of educational and social reform in rural Canada.


CTL1799 H

This course will deal with two aspects of curriculum policy. First the meaning of "curriculum policy" - how it is developed, and who influences that development - will be analyzed. Secondly, the impact of that policy on classroom practice as it is translated by school boards, school staff, and parents will be examined. The roles and responsibilities of teachers, parents, and other stakeholders will be emphasized.


CTL1799 H

This course examines how creative practices (visual, performative, textual, and new media) can be employed to generate innovative research in the humanities and social sciences. Course participants will analyze current debates on representation, rationale, and ethics, and in particular they will examine how arts-based practices/processes can move educational research towards more critical democratic, and participatory forms of research.


CTL1799 H

This course will focus on the public pedagogies of history in Canada. Starting in the mid-18th century and ending in the early 21st century, it will examine the different ways in which British North Americans and Canadians remembered their pasts, whether in genres such as written narratives, the collection of objects and the formation of museums, performances such as historical pageants, or the shaping of lanscapes through monument building and other devices. The course is based on the rich Canadian historiography in this area and is also informed by a wide range of international sources. The course also pays attention to the significance of relationships such as gender, class, race and ethnicity, and region in these processes.


CTL1799 H

This course is intended for students interested in exploring inquiry as a research methodology and a stance on practice, a framework for investigating and addressing issues in schools, classrooms, and community-based projects. We consider how taking an 'inquiry stance' on practice (Cochrane-Smith & Lytle, 2009) can be a means for educators to constructively problematize conventional educational arrangements, interrogate how knowledge is constructed, used, and evaluated, and re-imagine the roles they might play in actualizing change in their work contexts. Over the course of the term, participants will read numerous imperical examples of practitioner research, as well as work that examines the range of features, intellectual traditions, and disciplines that shape the field. We will also work as a large group and in smaller inquiry groups to develop understandings of methods and methodologies of practitioner inquiry in support of designing research projects, including site-based studies, thesis proposals, and dissertations.


CTL1799 H

This course will examine the research of, and different approaches to, applied and socially engaged theatre. Practitioners engaged in forms of applied theatre, such as drama in education, theatre for development, Verbatim theatre, partipatory theatre etc. often believe creating and witnessing thetrical events can make a difference to the way people interact with one another and with the world at large. The 'social turn' in theatre is understood politically, artistically, and educationally to be in the service of social change, although there is certainly no single nor consistent ideological position that supports the expansive use of theatre in classrooms and communities. Theatre has been consistently used in formal and informal educational settings as a way to galvanize participation and make learning more relational, or more a student-centred rather than teacher/facilitator-centred proposition. In addition, to exploring the educational value of applied theatre in a range of contexts and through a variety of interventions and intenstions, the course will also contemplate the ethics and poetics of representation in performance and in research.


CTL1799 H

Examination, analysis and research on Canadian children's literature from the perspectives of child and curriculum development with a view to selecting and using literature to enhance and extend children's literary experience.


CTL1799 H

This course will be organized in an action research format. The principal focus is to explore, develop and evaluate curriculum materials and strategies for secondary school science that help students become more dependent and self-directed as learners.


CTL1799 H

This course explores how and to what purpose our universal, compulsory and publicly funded system of schooling developed and why it gradually took its present form. To do this the course examines what often- competing expectations of schooling different groups of stakeholders held in the past and what society’s expectations are today. Among the topics to be considered are: the roots of the public system, the role of science and testing, the received vs. hidden curriculum, and how race, gender and immigration have shaped the school agenda.


CTL1799 H

This course will analyse the conditions of secondary schools as they relate to the processes of change. Of particular importance will be the culture of secondary schools, the role of teachers and administrators, and the role of the school board culture in facilitating secondary school change. The primary goal will be to assist the candidates in developing analysis skills to assess the capacity of their schools in addressing significant change initiatives.


CTL1799 H

In mathematics education today, policymakers, teachers, and researchers all agree that it is critical to link research to teaching practices in our schools. This means conducting research that is directly relevant to the everyday dilemmas of mathematics teachers, and supporting teachers to adopt practices that research has shown to be effective. In this course, we draw from a recent publication by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, that outlines ten key questions that teachers put forward to guide researchers in their work. We will investigate each of these questions, and assignments will include further research on one or more of these questions. Topics include: assessment, curriculum, culturally relevant mathematics pedagogy, student thinking, effective algebra teaching, teacher professional development, influence of technology on mathematical learning, effective teaching with technology, interventions for struggling students, helping students engage in ‘productive struggle.’


CTL1799 H

This course explores the various roles of education within the historical context of the British Empire and will pay particular attention to the place of gender within education. We will examine both the experiential dimensions of education a wll as representation, as well as paying attention to both formal and informal eudcations settings: schools, the family, labour (free and unfree), imperial regulation, mobility and travel, the military, religion, and cultural texts. The course spans the early modern period to the mid-20th century and examines a number of colonial and metropolitan sites.


CTL1799 H

This course explores the role education might play in increasing student's capacity for knowledge creation, with emphasis on 21st century competencies, multiliteracies, and assessment. Knowledge creation and innovation have risen to high prominence given pressing social and economic concerns. Nations across the world, including those performing well on current-day assessments, are engaged in reforms aimed at preparing citizens for Knowledge Age work. New forms of engagement and assessment are required, to both drive and evaluate change. Innovative practices often do not show significant, positive advances over traditional practices, presumably because current-day assessments under-represent new-age competencies. We will explore the strengths and limits of innovative educational practices in light of 21st century competencies and multiliteracies, and we will design assessments that might be used to increase the


CTL1799 H

This course is directed at those students who are interested in exploring changes in history and social studies curriculum in the schools over time, and focusing on some of the political and social issues that continue to give history education particular – and sometimes extreme -- importance today. While the course focuses mainly on Canada, we will also explore the often-contentious nature of history teaching around the world. The course as a whole will consider the questions: What are the factors influencing what history gets taught, why, how and by whom?


CTL1799 H

This course will look at a variety of places where women’s educational experiences have taken place in Canada. In keeping with my background as a historian, I will be emphasizing the ‘historical’ aspect of the title, less so the contemporary. We will discuss the gendered nature of formal educational settings, such as schools and universities. Equally importantly-given that girls’ and women’s experiences in formal educational settings is a relatively recent historical phenomenon-we will examine the many informal ways and locations in which ‘gendered curricula’ have been taught and experienced: the family and household; religious and voluntary organizations; the workplace; and various levels of the Canadian state. This course will explore women and girls’ experiences in these settings, the moral and social regulation of women's lives, and the ways in which gendered identities have been shaped in the past. In discussing these areas, we will pay particular attention to the links between gender relations and those of class, race, ethnicity, religion, and sexuality.


CTL1799 H

Immigration is more than just the movement of persons across international borders for the purpose of permanent resettlement. It is also a process by which immigrant-receiving states have sought to benefit the national economic well being while managing and, as much as possible, immigration’s social and demographic impact. While the notion of how best to fit immigrants into the Canadian context has changed with time, schools remain a critical element in attempting to fold immigrants and their children into the larger society. This course examines the immigration process and how it is mediated by educational gatekeepers


CTL1799 H

This course explores teaching and learning about environmental education (EE) through science, mtathematics and technology education. Central to this course is a commitment to a teaching and learning continuum that includes the use of schools, school grounds, the local and broader community, and outdoor education centres. Environmental education is a timely topic as we re-examine the purpose of schooling, the notion of literacy and citizenship, and consider current changes in curriculum and policy. We will attempt to link our discussions to the theory and practice of EE education. Specifically, we will examine issues in the history, philosophy and sociology of EE that have significance for science, mathematics and technology education; for example, the role and status of knowledge (theory), the nature of inquiry, the role of action, and the ways in which teachers' implicit philosophies of science influence their design of teaching /learning acitivities, and so influence learning outcomes. The course also examines the philosophy underpinning the EE movement in Canada and elsewhere, competing EE frameworks, and identifies some of the theoretical and practical problems surrounding its implementation.


CTL1799 H

This course explores ways in which holistic learning can be supported and enhanced by computer technology. Computer-supported environments and resources which enable new types of holistic learning will be examined, e.g. Web resources for holistic or arts education, tools for creative expression, online communities of learners, collaborative projects among schools involving intercultural exchanges or connecting school children and professionals, etc. Course activities will include guest presentations, group work, discussion of readings, reflection, and hands-on projects. Students will be guided in online communication, researching Internet resources for holistic learning, designing a holistic learning experience and creating a computer based presentation or portfolio. Basic computer skills are required.


CTL1799 H

The visual arts as experience and language greatly influence the ways we understand the world. The Common Curriculum, new technological interfaces, as well as theories about thinking styles and the teaching- learning dialogue, all emphasize the vocabulary of creative/artistic approaches. This course examines, through theoretical discussions and practical experience, the place of the visual arts for teachers and learners.


CTL1799 H

This course examines movements in contemporary film and video as attempts to construct new identities and audiences, cinematic languages and practices of interpretation. Particular emphasis will be given to critical viewing of visual texts as a means to understand aesthetic and political strategies, but the course will also consider the theoretical underpinnings and the infrastructural and political environments that enable the production of these experiments. Among works to be studied are AIDS activist video; Third Cinema; feminist film; black British cinema; queer film and video; indigenous media; and diaspora media.


CTL1799 Y

This is not a course about how to be, or, how to become a leader. This course has been designed to offer participants an opportunity to study the nature of leadership, whether it is found in a person or an idea, the concepts and activities associated with leadership in educational settings, and the principles associated with effective leadership. One of the main focii in the course will be on the moral dimensions of leadership – what is the right thing to do? Participants will be better prepared to both analyse and guide the development of leadership within varied educational institutions.


CTL1799 H

The course explores ways in which holistic or arts-based learning can be supported and enhanced by computer technology. Computer-supported environments and resources, e.g. Web resources for holistic or arts education, tools for creative expression, online communities of learners, Internet-based collaborative projects involving school children and professionals or inter-cultural exchanges. Activities will include discussion of reading, reflective journaling, group work developing a holistic or arts-based learning experience and creating an individual project or online portfolio. Each group or individual will select their own focus area which will form the basis for their final project. "C2C" and "Blackboard" are used in this course.


CTL1799 H

The course aims at familiarizing doctoral and master's students with problems, methods and practices that are specific to mathematics education research. It pays careful attention to epistemological issues in research in mathematics education by engaging students in reading and discussion papers on mathematics education research and by focussing on how researchers address particular epistemological issues. It critically reviews relevant and literature in mathematics education, theories, research designs, and methodologies used in published mathematics education research during the last 5 years, and leads to identification of problems for which research is needed. The course also describes the complexity of conducting research in mathematics education and how different methodologies approach such complexity. It will also include collaborative activities of various kinds, such as doing mathematics, defining terms, developing criteria to annotate research, evaluating evidence, designing research instruments, desinging analytics protocols, and implementing those in research records. Group work will be encouraged throughout the course.


CTL1799 H

This course explores theoretical and practical implications of different ways of knowing in science and technology to science and technology education. The overall purpose of the course is to stimulate discussion, to broaden thinking and to encourage informed decision making on issues of culture and science and technology, among science educators in a broad range of educational settings. Readings are organized to draw on ideas from: (i) internally based interpretations of science and technology; (ii) externally based interpretations of science and technology; (iii) global interpretations of science and technology. The latter will focus on how various cultures around the world understand and explain natural phenomena. A fourth category of readings will provide necessary background for course presentations. For presentation purposes course participants will select a way of knowing that is not part of regular science and technology instruction, design an instructional strategy, select a suitable topic and deliver the topic to colleagues in class. .


CTL1799 H

This course will research and examine practices that promote literacy learning for students in the elementary division. by examining Ministry initiatives and current research in the field, participants will investigate techniques for organizing programs that build literacy growth for all learners. Choosing and using fiction, non- fiction and poetry sources will be highlighted throughout the course.


CTL1799 Y

The course focuses on the social, economic and political environment of the greater urban Toronto area. We will discuss issues of poverty and wealth, power and difference, housing, health and services, urban district educational politics and policies and their consequences for teaching and learning. The course will take into account the questions and problems that participants bring from their school and classroom practice.


CTL1799 H

Motivational variables such as students’ interests and goals have considerable impact on their academic performances. This course focuses on the multidimensional nature of motivational forces such as interest, achievement goals, task value and self efficiency. Only by acknowledging and studying the interaction of these variables will we be able to help our academically unmotivated students. . .


CTL1799 H

In this course we will examine current theory, policy, and practice, regarding early literacy acquisition and development and the curriculum implications focussing on children’s early language and literacy development. We will explore the interrelationships between oral language development and early literacy development: early sources of literacy-related knowledge; and sources of variation in development, including maturational factors, sociocultural factors, home-school supports for literacy, and experience with more than one language/writing system. There is significant evidence to suggest that what happens in the early years regarding language and literacy is foundational in later literacy achievement and school success. There are many educators that need an opportunity to explore some of the recent research and theory, some of the implications of the new curriculum guidelines and policies, and to explore their own related robust questions. .


CTL1799 H

This course examines the articulations of knowledge, power and difference in local, school-based settings through the discursive paradigms of critical multiculturalism and anti-racism education. These paradigms pose a challenge to the euro-centric dominance in education and provide a critical methodology for educational and social change based on equity and inclusion. The course will further examine how issues of knowledge, power and social difference are complexly implicated within systems of oppression and domination related to race, class, gender, religion, language, disability and sexuality. These categories represent both sites of marginality as well as spaces for resistance and political mobilization. Broader implications that link knowledge, power and difference within a global context will be examined through anti- colonial discourses, globalization, environmental racism and indigenous knowledges. A new model for re- thinking schooling in a way that seeks to synthesize some of these local and global dimensions into an integrated context for teaching and learning, will be presented as a 'critical integrative framework for multi- centric education'. This new framework links indigenous knowledges, spirituality, representation, community and language together in an attempt to create a new paradigm for delivering education in plural societies.


CTL1799 H

This course will investigate many dimensions of leadership in education. A historical perspective of education will be used to demonstrate how many of the present day leadership philosophies have evolved. The necessary personal qualities and professional skills of educational leaders will be illustrated through theory, case studies and role play. The course is intended to stay in the realm of real life situations. The influence of society on leadership will be discussed as well as the major influential social segments such as government, special interest groups, technology and social mores and norms. Case studies and specific present day issues will be studied.


CTL1799 H

This course examines various issues of teacher education, some are longstanding criticisms (e.g. program is disjointed) while others are more recent concerns (e.g. defining a knowledge base for teachers). Specific topics will be examined in light of the current context of education with an effort to understand the complexity of becoming a teacher. Some topics to be considered are: history of teacher education, admissions, credentialing and certification, knowledge base for teachers, research on teacher education, developing a pedagogy of teacher education, preparation of teacher educators, and professional standards. Through analysis of the literature and discussion, we will consider the possibilities for a renewal of teacher education.


CTL1799 H

This course focuses on issues pertaining to relationships amongst: the global economy, professional science and technology and science and technology education. Particular attention is paid to problematic aspects of neo-liberalism and neo-conservativism. Curricular and pedagogical perspectives and practices in science and technology education that may counter problematic aspects of such relationships are presented. In addition to whole class course activities, students are required to prepare a research-informed course paper with regards to a specific issue of their interest that was addressed in the course.


CTL1799 H

This course explores the fundamentally cultural nature of all learning and cognition. The course is roughly split into three major sections. First, we explore sociocultural, situated, and cultural-historical approaches to understanding learning and cognition. These theoretical frameworks begin with the assumption that cognition is fundamentally social and cultural, always grounded in activity, practices and communities. Secondly, we will focus on empirical research on mathematical thinking in diverse contexts, ranging from elementary school mathematics classes to grocery shopping to carpet laying. Finally, using the theoretical and empirical work as a foundation, we will study approaches to designing instruction for culturally diverse groups of students.


CTL1799 H

This course explores 1) research on students' conceptions of the nature of science, 2) conceptual change models that guide studies on students' conceptions, 3) the effectiveness of new teaching strategies designed to address conceptual change learning and 4) studies on students' and teachers' conceptions of learning and teaching. Central questions that will guide discussions throughout the course include: What are conceptions? What should we make of students' conceptions? Are students' conceptions something to be exchanged, or is it enough to recognize that how you think about scientific phenomena differs from how others think about them? Do cognitive models of learning offer sufficient explanations for students' conceptions and how to change them? How can we organize educational practice in a way that deals effectively with students' conceptions?


CTL1799 H

There has been a volley of new policy initiatives in the funding and resource provisions to students with disabilities in Ontario. We will examine these changes in light of similar initiatives in international contexts, analysing and comparing implications for legal, political, social and educational directions.


CTL1799 H

This course explores historical and contemporary issues in the study of disability. There are three central themes. First and generally, through an examination of texts produced by writers with a variety of disabilities, students will be challenged to examine their own and society's views of disability by comparing their views with those reported by the insiders. Second and more specifically, an examination of society's historical and contemporary treatment of persons with disability will provide the impetus for further challenges to students' views of disability. Through the exploration of society's stigmatization and devaluing of persons with intellectual disability, students will develop a deeper understanding of the social role valorization of people with disabilities. Finally, this course seeks to promote a greater awareness of the experiences of people with disabilities and to contribute to social change by performing acts of advocacy that arise from these challenges to our beliefs. .


CTL1799 H

This course forms part of a summer institute on Anti-Racist and Feminist Studies to be held at OISE/UT. The two key visiting lecturers for this course are Chandra Talpade Mohanty and Philomena Essed, both eminent international feminist scholars in the field. The purpose of the course is to examine the many issues which arise in response to analyses of anti-racist feminist studies/practices. Key themes addressed include: transnational feminist theories, globalizing processes and women's work; female citizenship and social exclusion; postcolonial feminism and women studies; the future configuration of anti-racism as it relates to women's transnational identifications and diverse affiliations; and issues of difference and identity politics. This course touches on the aforementioned issues, and provides historical, critical, and epistemological perspectives on the development of antiracist feminist practices and their connections to a) educational praxis, and b) multiple social movements. In short, the course is designed to engage in dialogue about diverse anti- racist feminist theoretical frameworks and their application to education in the broadest sense. .


CTL1799 H

This course will begin with an examination of the theory and research that underlies constructivist learning and its historical and philosophical roots. Concepts like situated cognition, distributed cognition and constructivist learning theory will be examined. The educational applications that have developed out of these ideas, like problem based learning, collaborative learning and knowledge building will be explored in regards to how such concepts can inform and enhance the design of online environments and methods of teaching. We will look at different learning environments, both research projects and applications current in the field that instantiate various elements of these ideas. .


CTL1799 H

This course is a sequel to CTL1116. Various holistic approaches for the elementary math curriculum will be examined, focusing on classroom implemention issues, procedures and techniques. Strategies for dealing with various issues will be developed, keeping in mind the reality of Ontario elementary schools. Class members will normally be expected to conduct a classroom-based project involving the implementation of some new approach(s) or technique(s) with their students. Prerequisite: CTL116, or permission of instructor.


CTL1799 H

This course explores theoretical underpinnings and practical implications of student-directed, open-ended scientific investigations and invention projects in the context of elementary and secondary formal and informal school settings. In addition to readings, seminars, lectures, and class exercises, students will be expected to direct an open-ended scientific investigation or invention project of their design.


CTL1799 H

The intersections between the construction of self and the understanding of others in arts education projects will be the focus of this course. We will examine, in particular, the implications of drama education practices as they ask students to understand their particular gendered, cultural, sexual, racial, ethnic, and class-based identities in relation to the broader social world around them. Exploring pedagogical actions in relation to recent research in feminism, drama and arts education, this course will examine the philosophical underpinnings of the arts' and especially drama's potential as education and in education to build support networks in classrooms which favour participation of all individuals at their highest potential. .


CTL1799 H

This course involves utilizing cultural studies to re-examine, critique and present a supplement and/or alternative to multiculturalism and anti-racism, two discourses that are dominant in addressing socio-cultural difference and social justice in Canadian and American education and societies. Emphasizing American critical multiculturalism and Canadian anti-racism, the course renders multiculturalism and anti-racism "floating signifiers" and cultural studies a bridge between and/or an alternative to these traditionally discrete


CTL1799 H

Taking as a starting point a conception of pedagogy that centres relational encounters, this course seeks to consider the question of how to enter into relationships with others that seek to transform the very terms that define such relationships. The course explores how the concept of solidarity has been used to both explain the nature of social relationships between groups and individuals, as well as how it has been mobilized as a strategy for political work. In both counts, solidarity plays a key pedagogical role because it seeks to either sustain or challenge particular social arrangements. The course takes education and educational experience as a particular site for thinking through solidarity as both explanation and strategy, and considers a range of educational situations, including the classroom, to consider the complexities of solidarity as ethical encounters in pedagogical relations.


CTL1799 H

This course is a sequel to CTL1799H: Special Topics in Curriculum: Expressive Writing: Practice and Pedagogy. It examines and offers advance practice in nonfiction, expressivist prose with a range of specialized purposes. Students will explore conceptions of genre and the way genre shapes and is shaped by the social context of communications. The course considers rhetorical devices and figures of speech, such as metaphor and irony, and the way these formal elements influence meaning and the way their application depends on a community of understanding. The course draws from a range of theorists from Aristotle to Rorty, Bazerman, and Fish. Prerequisite: CTL1799H: Special Topics in Curriculum: Expressive Writing: Practice and Pedagogy.


CTL1799 H

Le cours propose l'intégration de l'évaluation à la situation enseignement - apprentissage. Il analyse le paradigme mesure - évaluation - décision en se penchant sure la typologie psychométric des tests, la théorie de la généralisabilité, les évaluations à grande échelle, les évaluation alternatives comme le portfolio. Les activités du cours porteront sur l'élavoration et la gestion des épreuves, la notation des résultats, la clarification des approches d'évaluation, l'appréciation des compétences langagières.


CTL1799 H

A recurring theme in local and international deliberations on science education is the role of school science in social, economic and cultural conditions, that is, in everyday life. This course will facilitate a systematic analysis of the role of school science in everyday life along five themes: Emergent constructs for school science; Science learning and needs in everyday life; Attempts to change school science and living conditions; Research findings and theoretical speculations regarding the transfer of school knowledge to everyday life; and, Synthesis of ideas for school science and the search for optimal living conditions.


CTL1799 H

This course addresses theories of writing instruction and assessment that influence current classroom practice. Connections between theory and practice will be explored in terms of what it means to be a writer and a teacher of writing. Issues such as teaching of writing conventions, formal and informal assessment of writing, sociocultural influences on students' writing, and the teacher's role in guiding student writing will be


CTL1799 H

This course will examine the pedagogical, strategic and socio-political dimensions of curriculum innovation in the classroom and in the school. In particular, we will focus on the experiences of elementary and secondary school students and teachers as they simultaneously engage in curriculum change and school reform.


CTL1799 H

This course will serve as an introduction to assessment theory. The development of assessment theory from its roots in psychometric theory to the broader range of assessment practices in use today is examined. Topics will include traditional classroom assessment, alternative assessment, large-scale assessment, assessment as inquiry, and accountability. Issues of reliability and validity for both traditional and alternative methods of assessment are considered. Under alternative assessment, attention will be given to innovative strategies such as self-evaluation or portfolio assessment. Emphasis will also be given to current provincial


CTL1799 H

This graduate seminar will explore recent developments in the theory and practice of feminist art, focusing specifically on its liberatory and pedagogical potential. Topics to be explored will include: the 'male gaze' and the feminist oppositional gaze; the role of the spectator in creating meaning and 'getting the message'; feminist art as activist art; gynocentric aesthetics versus feminist rejections of aethetics; and the role of the museum or gallery and documentary film in education. The work of feminist artists and theorists such as Anna Deavere Smith, Coco Fusco, the Guerrilla Girls, Adrian Piper, Barbara Kruger, Monika Treut, bell hooks, and Lucy Lippard will be considered. The course will also include visits to Toronto museums and galleries such as Power Plant and A-Space and the viewing of films such as Julie Dash's Daughters of the Dust.


CTL1799 H

This course examines the production and use of curriculum through the curriculum cycle of development, implementation, and evaluation. The theoretical underpinnings of major models associated with each component of the cycle are studied to identify their effects on the final curriculum and how it enhances the education of the student. Students will learn how to identify, adapt, and apply different approaches for each aspect of the cycle to achieve particular curriculum characteristics and/or to enhance the effectiveness of particular curricula. The knowledge and skills required by practitioners for each component of the cycle will


CTL1799 H

The conjunction of social norms, imagination and the experience of narrative worlds is as important in curriculum as it is in teaher education. Concerns about electronically fabricated media "realities" and their curricular implications provide the background for the course. The following themes structure the course content: 1) The fictionalization of reality. 2) Aesthetically shaped life worlds. 3) The crisis of social recognition. 4) Moral imagination. 5) Encounters of ethos in informal curricula, attending to multicultural dimensions of the encounter. 6) Judging moral dimensions of experiential and fictional narratives. 7) A social imagination curiculum, for students and teachers. It makes contributions to a field that is highly relevant and controversial


CTL1799 H

‘Knowledge building environment’ has an attractive 21st Century, knowledge society ring to it, but how is a knowledge building environment different from a learning environment and what makes it an environment rather than a tool? This course addresses these questions, providing answers that suggest that a fully-realized knowledge building environment is substantially different from a learning environment, incorporating different forms of support to accomplish a different level of process, and playing a role in a different kind of education or workplace culture. In this course we will explore the strengths and limits of educational environments for knowledge building and engage in design work aimed at advancing education for a knowledge society.


CTL1801 H

An examination of the different forms of research that makes central the practitioner's agenda about his/her practices. Alternatives include action science, action research, and participatory research. Emphasis will be placed upon history, ideology, and methods associated with each alternative. Conceptual analysis will be integrated with collaborative research in a field setting.


CTL1808 H

This course addresses the content, structure and strategies of recent innovations in preservice teacher education programs. Specific innovations in instruction, field-based activities and school-university relationships are critically examined in relation to changing and sometimes competing conceptions of teaching, learning to teach, and teacher education programs.


CTL1809 H

A seminar on narrative and story telling in the study of educational experience. Narrative is explored both as a fundamental form of experience and as a collection of methods for the study of experience. Narrative traditions in literary, philosophical, psychological and professional literatures are studied. Review of published theses and dissertations. Students should bring practical research agendas. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL4801 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1810 H

Critical examination of current qualitative paradigms of research on teaching. The course requires fieldwork research, which serves as the basis for seminar discussions. Students will have the opportunity to develop and present research ideas. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL4802 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1811 H

This course focuses on supporting graduate students at both the Master’s and Doctoral levels who are preparing research proposals, theses, dissertations, and for the comprehensive exam. The course aims to advance the research, writing, and exam preparations for its members and at the same time create an academic community. It examines students’ “works-in-progress” with the goal of improving and advancing their research. Course topics will include: defining the research question; framing the study; choosing an appropriate research methodology; gathering the data; analyzing the data; and writing the thesis. Through examination of various studies, students will deepen their understanding of the process of conducting research. One emphasis of the course will be research on teaching and teacher education. Each week, students will spend part of the class working in small groups with others who are at the same stage of the doctoral/master’s journey. The course will include: feedback on their work, time to discuss aspects of the research process, and an opportunity to present their work in a friendly, supportive environment.


CTL1812 H

Current educational literature reflects increasing attention to the practical and philosophical significance of ethical decision-making as a central aspect of the professionalism and accountability of teachers in their role as moral agents. This course will examine, through in part the use of case studies, some of the ethical complexities, dilemmas, and controversial issues that arise within the overall context of the school. It will raise questions about ethical concerns that occur as a result of teachers’ daily work with students, colleagues, administrators, and parents. The course will consider the nature of professional ethics in education and associated concepts of the moral climate of schools. It will explore theoretical and empirical knowledge in the field of applied educational ethics and the moral/ethical dimensions of teaching and schooling.


CTL1816 H

Intended for doctoral graduate students, the objective of the seminar is to do a critical examination of existing offical discourses on minority education. The notion of minority students’ inclusion is firmly inscribed in the official discourse in North America and in many countries around the world. From a critical theory standpoint, the course will emphasize the analysis of inclusion and other key concepts in the discourse on minority education with reference to society’s power structure, as well as social justice and equity issues. This critical examination will bring students to consider how the inclusion of students from diverse racial, ethnic, and linguistic backgrounds is claimed to be accomplished in schools. To attain the objective of the course, official discourses will be examined through existing educational policies and reforms, teachers’ training and


CTL1817 H

This course examines various issues of teacher education, including the longstanding criticisms (e.g. program is disjointed) while others are more recent concerns (e.g. defining a knowledge base for teachers). Specific topics will be examined in light of the current context of education with an effort to understand the complexity of becoming a teacher. This course will systematically examine the current research on teacher education. We will consider teacher education both within Canada and internationally. We will systematically work through various topics by reading widely, discussing issues, and trying to determine ways to reform and renew


CTL1818 H

In this class students will survey a range of issues related to the arts in education, including philosphical and theoretical issues, justifications and approaches to the arts in schools, the role of the arts in communities, as well as contemporary media and popular culture. The course will have a broad and interdisciplinary focus and will introduce students to relevant frameworks for conceptualizing a wide range of artistic practices in various educational contexts both within and beyond schools. From a consideration of various rationales for the inclusion of the arts in general education to the educational experiences of artists themselves, the course will seek to bridge the distance between contemporary arts and cultural theory and the integration of the arts in education through curriculum implementation and research.


CTL1819 H

In this course, we examine multiple and multicultural books. We examine the multicultural literature (what we read) as well as critically analyzing (how we read) these texts. Critical (indications of class, race and gender relations); multicultural (acknowledges the diversity in cultural experiences) analysis and social action/justice (what and how we act on these analyses) will guide our work together. The new knowledge constructed will inform how we create and develop critical perspectives and practices with students in the schools.


CTL1822 H

This course will examine conceptual, theoretical, and methodological considerations of urban school research. The arts generally- and theatre/drama in particular- will be used as a conceptual and methodological lens that informs questions of curriculum, subjectivity, space, diversity, policy, and youth culture in the study of urban schools. Studies of children/youth and youth culture and conceptions of arts/theatre practices and pedagogies in schools will be examined. Discussions of research problems in school-based research, and methodological and design choices in the development of school-based research projects will be a particular focus. Two of the primary goals of the course are: to expand students' qualitative research interpretation skills by examining the work of other school-based researchers and to help students formulate and articulate their research designs and methods for their own projects.


CTL1825 H

This course examines the role contemplation can play in teaching. Specifically, the concept of contemplation is explored in relation to reflection, personal narrative, and personal mythology. Students will also examine the thought and biographies of various contemplatives (e.g., Emerson, Huxley, Merton, and Steiner). The course provides opportunities to explore various modes of contemplation. Finally, contemplation will be linked with teaching and how it can allow teaching to become a more fully conscious act.


CTL1840 H

The course will consider topics relevant to the teaching of mathematics, science, and technology with a view to increasing the participation of women in these areas. We will review critically research on gender issues, on approaches to teaching mathematics and sciences, and on psychological and social factors related to the participation of women in mathematics and science.


CTL1841 H

A critical examination of current theoretical perspectives and research methods in science, mathematics and technology education. The course is designed for those contemplating a thesis in this area. Participants will have the opportunity to present seminars on their research interests.


CTL1842 H

Mixed methods research is drawing increasing attention from educational researchers who seek richer data and stronger evidence for knowledge claims than does any single method used alone. This course is aimed to provide both theoretical and practical foundations for mixing different research methods. In this course, students will discuss various conceptualizations and frameworks of the mixed method research including various designs employing both quantitative and qualitative inquiries, sampling strategies, analysis, synthesis, and representation of findings. The students will participate in both collective and independent mixed-method research projects to develop competencies in mixed research methods.


CTL1843 H

A comparison of evaluation models and a study of related technical issues and topics such as outcome-based evaluation, mixed methods, measurement of change, validity typology, impact assessment, logic modeling, training evaluation, multilevel analysis, cluster evaluation, and meta-analysis and meta-evaluation. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL2803 are prohibited from taking this course. Prerequisite: CTL1040 (previously CTL2006) or equivalent, or permission of instructor.


CTL1844 H

A seminar dealing with theories and practical constraints in the implementation of evaluation strategies in field settings. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL2810 are prohibited from taking this course. Prerequisite: CTL1843 (previously CTL2803) or equivalent. Note: Practicum CTL2997 and Seminar CTL1844 may not both be taken for credit in fulfilling the requirements of the eight half-courses in the Ed.D. program in Evaluation.


CTL1845 H

An examination of the technical issues that arise in using performance assessment in the classroom, in large- scale assessment programs, and in program evaluation. Topics addressed include definition and conceptualization, scoring rubric construction, evidential and consequential validity, generalizability, bias and fairness, comparability, and standard setting. Prerequisites: CTL1042 (previously CTL2009) or equivalent, or permission of instructor.


CTL1846 H

Assessment is an integral part of the instructional and learning process. We are also aware that assessment is increasingly used as a means to drive educational reforms and evaluate the quality of education by holding educators accountable for students’ learning outcomes. This test-driven educational reform effort has caused a great deal of controversy in modern society across continents. This course is intended for those interested in developing critical assessment literacy. The course readings and activities will focus on both theoretical underpinnings and issues associated with educational assessment practices in a large context and on the practical demands and challenges of various assessment activities in and outside of classroom. Throughout the course, we will learn about alternative assessment approaches that can serve teaching and learning. Students are encouraged to bring their own subject domains (e.g., math, science, language arts, or second language education) to classroom discussions and course projects. Through this course, students will be able to: - critically evaluate various assessment initiatives that impacted educational practice in instructional planning, theories of cognition and learning, program evaluation, and policy. - have a better understanding of uses of assessment for different purposes and contexts; - select and discuss alternative assessment approaches for teachers in light of current curricular expectations; - have systematic knowledge about core concepts (e.g., validity, reliability, washback, norm- vs. criterion- referenced testing) underlying educational assessment; - develop knowledge and skills for improving classroom assessment;


CTL1847 H

The course is designed to develop and extend the data analytic skills that students began to acquire in other research methods courses and to learn how to synthesize and communicate research findings to a wide range of audiences. The course is applied rather than statistical in the sense that students will learn basic principles and techniques through the instructor’s modeling in class and then apply these new techniques to real-life problems using publicly available educational data or their own data. Students will participate in lab sessions in which they will learn computer skills (e.g., NVivo, SPSS, EXCEL, R) necessary for data analysis. The course is designed to serve doctoral students who have taken introductory research methods courses. Students who completed data collection or currently collect data for their theses are welcome to the course. Students pursuing the MA degree need to contact the instructor to receive permission to take the course. My instructional goal is to ensure that students completing the course successfully should be able to: • Identify and carry out the appropriate analytic technique for organizing the given data to answer the research question; • develop a critical understanding of the assumptions and limitations associated with specific data analytic techniques; • feel competent in analyzing most types of educational data; • understand the standards of educational research and apply such an understanding to real data analysis and synthesis; • Develop the abilities to evaluate the quality of inferences and interpretations from data analyses as a way of building validity claims; • Interpret research findings substantively and communicate them to not only academics but also practitioners.


CTL1861 H

An ethnography - of a community, classroom, event, program - seeks to describe the set of understandings and specific knowledge shared among participants that guide their behaviour in that specific context. The value of ethnography as a research method lies in its holistic view of the particular culture, cultural situation or cultural event under study. Critical ethnography is fundamentally concerned with questions of education and inequality. It seeks not only to describe conditions of inequality, but also aims towards creating change in the conditions it describes. In this course we will inquire into the concerns of critical ethnography and learn about conducting and writing critical ethnography by reading and discussing studies that explore the relationship between education and ethnicity, gender, class, race and minority languages.


CTL1863 H

This is an advanced-level doctoral seminar designed to permit students to explore in considerable depth a few currently controversial issues with respect to the role of educational activities and programs in national development, with particular focus on developing nations and developing areas within richer nations. The particular issues chosen for analysis in any given year are selected by the students. Students are expected, through seminar presentations, to identify the key arguments or "positions" with reference to a controversy of interest to them, and to analyse and evaluate those positions using both relevant theory and available empirical data. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL6800 are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL1864 H

This course is designed for prospective or practising researchers who wish to use comparative data in their work. Problems in both the acquisition and the use of such data will be considered. Topics will range from the practical problems of gathering data in a foreign country to the analytic tools available for analysing large volumes of data from many countries. Particular attention will be paid to (a) the special analytical problems faced when using comparative data, and (b) the use of comparative data to test propositions and to develop theory in education.


CTL1899 H

The proseminar half-course will be organized into three-hour sessions. These sessions will often involve two parts, which may be organized in any order from week to week. First, some classes will feature a member of the CSTD faculty who will be asked to introduce her or his research to the invited students and to speak to the question of how her or his work is situated within curriculum studies. Invited faculty will be able to choose one or two readings for that week, in order to give students an introduction to their work prior to the class. Second, each class session will focus on a topic of interest to doctoral students related to academic work in general and doctoral work in particular. The course will introduce students to the details of being a PhD student in CSTD and will provide a forum for exchanging resources and ideas among students. In tandem, the proseminar will provide students with an introduction to academic life in general, including issues such as conferences, publications, teaching experience, academic job markets, etc.


CTL1921 H

Knowledge Building Environments (KBEs) have two principal objectives: (a) to upgrade the conceptual quality of what is learned; and (b) to increase participants’ abilities to monitor, control, and improve their own knowledge. In this course students will examine different approaches to KBE development and will participate in an online network devoted to advancing designing and use of KBE.


CTL1923 H

Leading edge computer technologies that support mobile and ubiquitous knowledge construction will be studied. Implications for mind, education and technology will be examined in addition to the practical applications in schools and other educational settings.


CTL1926 H

This doctoral level seminar adopts an innovative format where students become a knowledge community and explore a set of themes related to the course topic. We try to uncover the implications for learning and instruction in the classroom, on the street, in the museum, online, or anywhere else that learning may happen. We make connections to the theoretical foundations from the learning sciences, media theory, human- computer interaction, architecture, information science, and other disciplines. Each week, we explore a new theme, building on course content left from previous years. In exploring these themes, the class adopts media practices that characterize various knowledge media - from wikis to social tagging, to immersive environments. We explore these practices during class, and discuss the relevant issues and opportunities. Students work in teams to define a "Design idea" that applies ideas from the course to define a potential application that would serve a particular knowledge community. Note: CTL1926 is cross-listed as KMD2003. As a result, enrolment in both courses is limited to 10 students per course. Students who are enrolled in CTL1926 may not be enrolled in KMD2003


CTL1997 H

Supervised experience in an area of fieldwork, under the direction of faculty and field personnel.


CTL1998 H

Description as for CTL1798.


CTL1999 H

This class will explore both foundational and current literature on theories of mathematics education. It will highlight theories from philosophy and social sciences that continue to influence the teaching of mathematics. This includes recent developments in areas within mathematics education such as types of research frameworks, computer as a mediating tool, the role of algorithms in enhancing mathematical thinking, proof and proving. The course will also discuss the integration of theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools.


CTL1999 H

This course provides an introduction to models of innovation in education, with emphasis on the education for knowledge creation. Most constructivist models of education favor social-constructivist learning, which has its roots in the work of Dewey, Vygostky, and Piaget. There is a tendency to compare these innovations with a stereotypic traditional “transmission” approach (lecture, recitation, fact learning, seatwork, etc.) rather than comparing nearer neighbors. Yet there are fundamental differences within the broad family of social- constructivist approaches – from models based on guided discovery to knowledge creation. If education is to progress we need to examine these differences. Toward that end students will be positioned to identify environments and technologies that foster knowledge creation and advance theories, pedagogies, and technologies to better support that goal. The Institute for Knowledge Innovation and Technology (IKIT) holds weekly research meetings and students can join meetings in person, by video conference, and/or work online.


CTL1999 H

The proliferation of narrative activities in schools and universities is evident. Yet their specific curricular qualities and their different functions with regard to teaching and learning are rarely considered. This course will address these issues. An analytical framework will be presented to explore various types of narrative curricula conceptually, with a view to different kinds of engagement required by teachers and students. We will examine change processes involved and outcomes that can be expected. A range of practices will concern us, involving the use of cases, experiential narratives, accounts by Holocaust survivors, as well as the narrative curricula resulting from media consumption. Throughout the course, we will emphasis conceptual analysis along with the life experiences of course participants. Experiential responses to readings, speakers and class presentations are expected.


CTL1999 H

Educational assessments are an essential part of the instructional and learning process. Educational testing has become a major concern of educators as it is increasingly used as a tool to evaluate the quality of education. These tests-driven educational reform efforts have generated much controversy today. There is an increasing recognition of the need to rethink assessment practice and redirect its role to teaching and learning. This course critically examines the status quo of contemporary educational assessment and helps students to reconceptualize the use of assessment for improving instruction and learning in the classroom. The emphasis throughout the course is on the practical, yet critical issues of assessment in education, related to the following areas: (1) Public debate over testing and assessments; (2) Relation of assessment to instruction; (3) Purposes of classroom assesssment; (4) Issues related to accommodating the needs of exceptional students; (5) Use and misuse of assessment; (6) Equity and fairness issues in assessment; and (7) Use of assessment for educational research. The course encourages students to integrate their knowledge of and experiences with specific subject domains (eg., math, science, language arts, or second language education) into classroom discussions.


CTL1999 H

The course is designed to develop and extend the data analytic skills that students began to acquire in other research methods courses and to learn how to synthesize and communicate research findings to a wide range of audiences. The course covers qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods data analysis approaches to complex educational, psychological and social phenomena. The course is applied rather than statistical in the sense that students will learn basic principles and techniques through the instructor’s modeling in class and then apply these new techniques to real-life problems using publicly available educational data or their own data. Students will participate in lab sessions in which they will learn computer skills (e.g., NVivo, SPSS, EXCEL, R) necessary for data analysis. The course is designed to serve doctoral students who have taken introductory research methods courses. Students who completed data collection or currently collect data for their theses are welcome to the course. Students pursuing the MA degree need to contact the instructor to receive permission to take the course.


CTL1999 H

How can technology enhance learning and instruction? How do students learn from technology? What new opportunities does it provide teachers? This course examines the challenges and opportunities of technology, with an emphasis on math and science education. We will define a set of criteria that can be used to critique technology products or programs. We will examine current issues from research concerned with pedagogical frameworks, assessment, gender and cultural equity, teaching practices, and systemic reform.Throughout the semester, students will participate in the design, peer review, and revision of a lesson that integrates technology effectively. Students will work collaboratively on this design project, reflecting on issues of pedagogy, assessment, and lesson planning. Each week in class, students will present a technology product or program and critique it according to our criteria. Students will read research papers concerned with technology-based innovations, and take turns leading the class in activities and discussion relevant to the readings. Course materials, announcements, and interactions will be coordinated through an online community, including weekly electronic discussions of engaging topics.


CTL1999 H

This course explores literature, art, film, and video as a media of cultural memory in regard to historical events of mass violence and social suffering. Consideration will be given to pedagogical frameworks for initiating cultural pedagogy. Such frameworks include: the relation of cultural memory to practices of historiography (what is the evidentiary ground of cultural memory), the politics, ethics and pragmatics of representation (what is to be remembered, why, and how), the importance of materiality and form (how do aesthetics and media shape practices of cultural inheritance), and the dynamics of cultural inheritance (how do identification, transference, and trauma enable and limit historical understanding and social possibilities). These elements of cultural pedagogy will examine in the context of responses to events associated with state sponsored violence including genocide, partition, colonization, slavery and internment. This course will be of interest to those studying how cultural practices are implicated in the function of the past in the present, and in particular, in regard to how one might take into account the enduring legacies of various forms of social violence. .


CTL1999 H

This class will explore both foundational and current literature on discourse in K-12 math/science classrooms. Readings will focus on both discourse as a classroom phenomenon and discourse as an analytic tool for doing research in classrooms.


CTL1999 H

This course will introduce students to some of the key philosophical works of Hannah Arrendt and explore their implications/significance for the study of pedagogy, politics, culture and democracy. A central aim is to highlight the role that an Arrendtian vision of political philosophy and social life might bring to larger questions about the constitution of feminist ethics, pedagogy, and learning. A secondary aim of the course is to work at the level of feminist theory much more substantially as it relates to education and the work of Hannah Arrendt. This will require developing some theoretical links between identity work, social narration, political life and philosophical accounts of 'becoming' politically responsible that are fundamental to more ethically oriented feminist theories.


CTL1999 H

This advanced research methods course addresses all stages of research - from planning, to data collection, to analysis, to writeup - for projects that draw on videorecordings of naturalistic human interaction as a major data source. The course will give students experience with actually collecting and analysing video data, and students will have opportunities to develop and present research ideas.


CTL1999 H

Testimony has become pervasive in North American culture. It is offered for various purposes in courtrooms, books, documentary film and video, museums, schools, on television, radio and over the internet. Testimony has become central to learning about/from history. This course explores not only what and how testimony


CTL1999 H

A course designed to permit the study (in a formal class setting) of a specific area of curriculum or instruction not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. (This course does not fulfil the purpose of CTL1998, which in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning is normally conducted on a tutorial


CTL1999 H

This course explores the theory and practice of mixed research methods in education and social science and discusses various conceptualizations and frameworks of the mixed method research inquiry including design, analysis, synthesis, and representation. Students will participate in both collective and independent mixed- method research projects to develop competencies in mixed research methods.


CTL1999 H

If interpretation pervades all knowledge, understanding becomes the key curricular issue, rather than the transmission of facts and truths. We examine some of the profound consequences of such a view for curriculum studies and inquire into our own experience in that area. We ask, what are the curricular "conditions for understanding" and how do we develop interpretive competence, especially in a multicultural society.


CTL1999 H

The topics for this course are the research issues and the analysis methodologies appropriate to the kinds and volumes of data collected in telelearning research and practice, including full-text transcripts, usage and access logs, questionnaires, and tests. The design and assessment problems will be considered within and across a variety of learning scenarios and telelearning technologies. The analytic goals may be assessment of student learning over the network, evaluation of course design and effectiveness, review and improvement of telelearning technology systems and monitoring and improving information flow. The summarization data visualization and the applications of latent semantic analysis.


CTL1999 H

This course will explore the fragmented and individuated nature of self within the broader framework of western culture, specifically addressing the social construction of the dichotomy between child and adult. This dichotomy will be investigated by drawing on personal experience, conducting research, and reviewing the research literature in relation to identity, learning and teaching. Through narrative inquiry with the focus on text analysis through hermeneutics, participants will conduct research into the recursive and aesthetic nature of learner/teacher identities. .


CTL1999 H

An exploration of how one can recognize and act in regard to the words, feelings, and actions of others in ways that take account of the historical specificity of other people's experience. The purpose of the seminar is to deepen and conceptually sharpen how this problem can most usefully be stated, understand the issues and contradictions embedded in this problem, grasp how these are manifested in practices of pedagogy across a variety of sites of education, and to consider how attempts have been made to "work within" and "work through" the dynamics which set the terms of this problem. Participants will be asked to address how the problem of "understanding others" bears on their own research, writing and teaching.


CTL1999 H

This seminar-style course draws upon the views of space, time, matter, relationship, change, consciousness and nature of leading-edge scientists such as D. Bohm, Dana Zohar, Ilya Prigogine, Rupert Sheldrake, James Lovelock, Lyn Margulis and Fritjof Capra to explore the emerging quantum worldview and the implications for curriculum, learning processes, and the dynamics of change in formal and non-formal learning communities. The parallels between the quantum worldview and Eastern mysticism/philosophies will also be examined as will the potential of overlooked learning modalities suggested by those parallels. The course will be of particular interest to students whose principal interests lie in the overlapping fields of environmental, global and holistic education and transformative learning.


CTL1999 H

This course will engage in the study of various critical and theoretical approaches to the interpretation, analysis, and teaching of literary narrative as fiction and non-fiction prose. Underlying concerns are: the relation of the reader’s experience of the text to the text itself, the relevance of critical theory to analyzing and reflecting on the sources of that relationship, and an exploration of addressing and mobilizing these consideration in the interpretation, writing, and teaching of narrative texts as forms of literature.


CTL1999 H

This seminar-style course will consider the moral and conceptual dimensions of environmental issues by examining a range of environmental and humane philosophies that extend the domain of moral concern beyond the human. Some of the topics to be examined include: what constitutes moral standing, foundations of environmental ethics, obligations to non-human living beings, anthropocentrism, ecocentrism, biocentrism, deep ecology, animal liberation philosophies, ecofeminism, social ecology, environmental justice, the ethics of sustainability, indigenous and non-western perspectives on environmental ethics, eco-spirituality and ethics. Each topic will also be thoroughly explored in terms of the implications for curriculum, learning and teaching, and for the goals, ethos, relational dynamics, and other aspects of formal and non-formal learning communities.


CTL1999 H

This course conceptualizes teaching as an art and craft and seeks to understand the anatomy, dynamics, critique, and improvement of teaching from the standpoint of different guiding metaphors of aesthetic criticism. It offers a view of teaching that is highly systematic and detailed, but goes beyond standard mechanistically grounded views of teaching and its critique.


CTL1999 H

This course will critically examine the theoretical concepts of leadership in relaitonship to the social and organizational context in which curriculum is developed, implemented, and evaluated. The curriculum cycle involves a wide range of roles within the school system, from classroom teacher to Director of Education. Instructional (Sheppard), transformational (Leithwood), moral (Hodgkinson), and participative (Yukl) approaches to leadership must all be utilized within the cycle and by different roles. The variations in conceptual leadership frameworks will be explored in relation to various models of curriculum development (Schwab, Walker), implementation (Hal & Loucks, Leithwood), and evaluation (Provus, Stake, Eisner). Recent educational reforms in organization and curriculum and the leadership required to implement and sustain these reforms will provide a futher focus for the integration of leadership and curriculum theory.


CTL1999 H

This course will consider how queer theory might alter our ways of thinking about and experiencing bodies in education, in curriculum and in schools. Has queer simply become a code word for "lesbian" and "gay" identity in education? What does queer mean if not identity? What and who are queer bodies in schools? Who gets to decide? We will start the course by tracing the emergence of queer theory during the 1990s. Some queer theories were critiqued for placing too much emphasis on texts and Eurocentric theory while not paying enough attention to issues of race, to feminist knowledge, to everyday experiences of the body. In response, we shall place queer theory in conversation with critical race theories, feminist-poststructuralism and materialist theories. Recent examples from North American curriculum, schooling and education will illustrate these mutations in queer theory. Theses examples will include narratives about teachers and students' bodies, as well as ideas about reading practices and queer pedagogy.


CTL1999 H

Course participants will meet in a computer conference setting to identify, express, discuss and clarify their perspectives on an important research topic in educational technology, such as the side effects of educational technology, or philosophical perspectives on educational technology. Emphasis will be placed on drawing connections between the theoretical knowledge base and the world of practice, in articulating and examining perspectives and goals, and in critically analyzing other participants' reports.


CTL1999 H

The purpose of this advanced seminar is to give doctoral students an opportunity to continue their engagement with theoretical questions related to curriculum studies beyond the introduction offered in the Foundations course. As the title suggests, the course seeks to engage questions, explore puzzles, and elucidate the range of debates that enliven contemporary curriculum studies. To do this, the class will explore some of the most recent published works, considering multiple perspectives on a given topic, as well as exploring the various genealogies that animate these contemporary issues. Students will engage both contemporary accounts of ongoing debates as well as historical texts that inform these debates. In order to take the course, students must have already taken CTL1000, and preference will be given to students who are close to completing their course requirements. The course will be geared toward doctoral students. Students in other programs may request permission from the instructor and must demonstrate evidence of a solid background in curriculum studies.


CTL1999 H

With significant reduction in resources in the academic institution, the goal of the course is to examine the ongoing need for staff development in the changing academic environment and to explore possible innovative ways that respond to future needs.


CTL1999 H

This half-course colloquium will be open to all new and returning doctoral students. While not required, new doctoral students will be strongly encouraged to participate, and current doctoral students will be invited as well. The objectives of the Colloquium are to begin socializing doctoral students into academic work in the areas of Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development, and to introduce them to the work of CSTD faculty on the ways in which faculty situate their work within curriculum studies.


CTL2799 H




CTL2799 H




CTL2999 H

A course designed to permit the study, (in a formal class setting) of specific areas of measurement and evaluation not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. (This course does not fulfil the purpose of CTL2998, which is normally conducted on a tutorial basis.)


CTL3000 H

Foundation course for the Second Language Education Program, also open to students from other programs. The course is offered for students particularly concerned with issues of second language instruction, education for minority populations, and pluralism in education, defined in terms of language, culture (including religion), or ethno-racial origin. The emphasis is on study of major foundational writings that have shaped current thinking about these topics and on deriving implications for reflective teaching practice. Registration preference given to SLE students.


CTL3001 H

This colloquium provides opportunities to become familiar with ongoing research, research methodologies, and curriculum activities in second-language learning and teaching.


CTL3002 H

This course deals with current theory and practice in second and foreign language methodologies - their role and implications on language learning and teaching. A comprehensive survey and analysis of language methodologies will be conducted both from a historical perspective and in epistemological terms. The course will introduce the student to several of the fundamental concepts of second language teaching. The latest developments in the field and the new perspectives opened by the research will play a major role in the course.


CTL3003 H

This course deals with current theory and practice in the development of the second language curriculum -- the planning, needs analysis, objectives, content, structure, and evaluation of second language programs for preschoolers to adults. The course is not an introduction to language teaching methods, but rather assumes that participants have taken such a course previously and/or have significant language teaching experience, which they now wish to consolidate -- by studying fundamental issues, current theory and research, recent publications and curriculum initiatives -- to develop their professional knowledge and capacities in this area.


CTL3004 H

The language awareness movement is based on the belief that a place should be found in the curriculum for exploring the nature of language: its rule-governed structure, its variety and its universal characteristics, the way it is acquired by native speakers and second language learners, its role in society, and its role in creating, sustaining, and enhancing power. The aim of the course is to consider (i) language awareness in first, second, and foreign language education; (ii) the special need for language awareness in L2 contexts; and (iii) the role of language awareness in teacher development.


CTL3005 H

This course will consider current topics relevant to the teaching of second and foreign languages. Specific topics will vary depending on the students' interests, but will normally include curriculum planning and syllabus design, classroom-oriented research, the teaching of reading, writing, and oral communication skills, error analysis, pedagogic grammar, and testing.


CTL3007 H

This seminar focuses on discourse and discourse analysis, and their application to the field of second language education. We will review various trends in discourse analysis, such as pragmatics, ethnomethodology, conversational analysis, interactional analysis, critical discourse analysis. We will consider language and discourse from the perspective of political economy and the construction of identities. Attention will also be paid to gender, gender performance and sexuality as identity constructs, as these are interrelated with language use and language acquisition.


CTL3007 H

Ce cours a pour but d’explorer une conception élargie du langage et de la communication basée sur le discours et l’analyse du discours. Les interactions humaines et sociales se construisent en grande partie au moyen du discours, à travers sa production, sa circulation, sa diffusion, sa légitimation, sa valorisation, sa consignation, sa mise en archives. Deux modes principaux permettent sa production : la parole et l’écrit. La parole inclut divers types d’activités, telles l’expression verbale, la conversation, l’interaction verbale, tandis que l’écrit suppose la production de textes de divers genres. Dans les sciences humaines et sociales, le discours constitue à la fois un mode d’accès à la connaissance et un contenu à étudier. En guise d’illustration, nous examinerons diverses applications de l’analyse de discours, en particulier lorsqu’il s’agit de comprendre la production discursive dans l’exercice d’activités de travail ou dans la construction de l’identité


CTL3008 H

Linguistic and cultural diversity have always characterized human societies and have usually played a central role in mediating power relations between dominant and subordinate groups. In recent years, theorists working within the framework of Critical Pedagogy have begun to describe how societal power relations are manifested in schools both through interpersonal interactions and the hidden curriculum. In particular, theory has focused on how language use and language learning interact with dimensions such as class, race, ethnicity, and gender in mediating power relations within the educational system. The course will focus on this body of theory and research and explore its applications to current educational issues related to minority students in both Canadian and international contexts.


CTL3010 H

This course examines theory and research in second language (L2) acquisition, including cognitive, linguistic, social, biological and affective variables that account for relative success in L2 learning. The role of instruction in L2 learning is also discussed.


CTL3011 H

This course examines bilingual education in its many forms. Particular emphasis will be placed on research questions and findings related to bilingual education in Canada - for English Canadians, French Canadians, immigrant populations, and Native peoples. Issues such as the effects of bilingualism on cognitive functioning, psycholinguistic abilities, and personality will also be explored.


CTL3011 H

Ce cours a pour but de familiariser les étudiants avec les théories sur le bilinguisme et avec les méthodes de recherche qui ont été développées pour en traiter, de façon à pouvoir prendre en compte ces connaissances dans la recherche, l'enseignement ou le développement de matériel pédagogique, que ce soit en milieu bilingue ou plurilingue, ou en rapport avec l'enseignement des langues. Il porte plus particulièrement sur l'individu faisant l’acquisition ou ayant recours à deux ou plusieurs langues. Il aborde également la question du bilinguisme sur le plan des interactions langagières au sein de communautés linguistiques, comme la famille, la ville, ou le monde du travail.


CTL3013 H

This course provides an overview of current practices and problematic issues in language assessment. Topics include approaches commonly taken to developing and using language assessment instruments and procedures, their evaluation, and their applications in specific educational contexts.


CTL3013 H

Ce cours fournit une introduction à cinq domaines de l'évaluation langagière des langues premières et secondes : la compréhension auditive, la compréhension de la lecture, l'interaction orale, l'expression écrite et la compétence langagière en général. À l'intérieur de chacun de ces domaines, les principaux instruments de mesure, l'usage approprié de ces instruments, et les questions clés sont étudiées. L'évaluation langagière en milieu minoritaire est un thème qui sera examiné plus particulièrement.


CTL3015 H

A seminar to examine research on literacy education in second, foreign, or minority languages in subject or medium of instruction programs. Psychological and social perspectives are explored in relation to commonalities among and differences between second-language teaching in various kinds of world contexts.


CTL3018 H

The study of language politics, language planning and policy-making focuses on how social groups, governments, and other bodies, are involved in language issues, such as language teaching. There are few countries in the world today where language does not give rise to political debates. The state is frequently involved in the way decisions are taken about the languages to be used and promoted in various domains of public life (e.g. education, justice, the media) and even about what "counts" as a language. This course aims at providing some understanding of works conducted in this field, the way in which they are developing and the problems they face. There will be an emphasis on practical examples of language planning and policy issues drawn from Canada and other countries, and there will be scope for students to nominate examples, topics or case studies for class consideration. The course is suitable for students interested in the wider policy contexts in Canada and overseas of language education and language issues.


CTL3018 H

Ce cours a pour objectif de mieux comprendre de quelle façon les interventions humaines sont réalisées sur les dynamiques linguistiques. Nous examinerons en particulier sur quelles bases idéologiques et politiques on en vient à élaborer des politiques linguistiques, quelles en sont les composantes et les principales étapes, et de quelle façon les politiques linguistiques se répercutent dans les pratiques langagières des acteurs sociaux. Idéalement, la politique linguistique devrait permettre à l'école une meilleure prise en compte du contexte qui lui est propre, de façon à harmoniser les rapports entre, d'une part, les langues de l'école, à savoir la langue d'enseignement et les langues secondes ou étrangères à enseigner (ou en d'autres termes la langue en tant que médium d'instruction et en tant que matière enseignée), et d'autre part, la réalité linguistique des élèves, incluant en premier lieu leur langue première pouvant correspondre aussi bien à la langue dominante, à une langue minoritaire, à une langue d'origine ou à une langue autochtone, et, en second lieu, leurs pratiques langagières axées autour du bilinguisme, de la dominance linguistique, de l'alternance et du mixage de codes. La version française de ce cours satisfait aux exigences de cours de CSTD.


CTL3019 H

The last forty years have seen extensive research in FSL education in Canada, largely as a result of the advent of immersion programs. The course will attempt a state-of-the-art assessment of research issues spanning aspects of program design, evaluation, and implementation of all forms of FSL education with particular attention being given to research methods (core, extended, immersion, and adult FSL).


CTL3020 H

This course focuses on second-language writing, with special attention to relations between research, theory, and practice. Topics include text, psychological and social models of second-language writing instruction and learning, ways of responding to student writing, and techniques for evaluating writing.


CTL3024 H

In this course the many dimensions of second and foreign language teacher education will be explored. The course will focus on four main areas including 1) the foundations of second language teacher education, 2) initial teacher preparation, 3) in-service education and on-going professional development as well as 4) activities and procedures for second language teacher education. Consideration will be given to the specific needs of different types of second language teachers working in either traditional or non-traditional learning environments with learners of different ages. The implications of responding to these diverse needs for second language teacher education will also be explored.


CTL3025 H

This course addresses the influences of community, home, school, and cultural heritage on (second) language acquisition and language use. Social and educational implications of language variation are addressed, particularly as they relate to language policy and social and linguistic change. Factors such as gender, ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic background are studied as they relate to language use and perception. The current status of different language minority groups is considered, and related cultural and pedagogical issues are raised. Students will acquire an understanding of basic concepts, findings, issues, and research methods in sociolinguistics as they relate to second and foreign language learning, teaching, and use. They will develop a sociolinguistic perspective for the teaching and learning of second and foreign languages and obtain experience in the use of sociolinguistic techniques for the description of language in society as it pertains to second language learning, teaching, and use.


CTL3026 H

This course examines theories, research methods, and substantive findings about second language speakers’ and learners’ pragmatic style and development. Themes to be explored include the relationship between pragmatic and grammatical development, the role of different learning environments (such as study abroad, EFL vs. ESL), options and effects of instruction, individual differences, institutional discourse, cross-cultural politeness studies, electronic communication, and the interrelation of social context, identity, and L2 pragmatic learning. Through the class, students will understand basic concepts, findings, issues, and research methods in interlanguage and cross-cultural pragmatics; develop perspectives on the teaching and learning of second and foreign languages as pertains to the acquisition of pragmatic competence; and investigate in detail a topic related to the field of interlanguage pragmatics.


CTL3027 H

Ce cours présente des modèles qui permettent la mise en oeuvre des principales composantes de la programmation comme: a) l'identification des résultats généraux et spécifiques d'un cours ou d'un module; b) la planification de projets à long terme; c) l'élaboration d'outils d'intervention par rapport à differentes stratégies. La résolution de problèmes constituera un élément important des composantes étudiées. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL1002H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL3028 H

An analysis of the components of literacy programs in the elementary years. The course will focus on reading and writing elementary education, and will use a wide range of methods and materials of instruction. Topics include: child- and teacher-centred philosophies, content area literacy, use of digital technology, and assessing growth in reading and writing. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL1003H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL3029 H

This course is designed to acquaint teachers with a broad spectrum of literature for children and young adults and to explore ways in which children’s literature can enhance students’ literacy and content learning across the curriculum. Please note that this course involves extensive online discussion, as well as face-to-face meetings, and a storytelling assignment. Exclusion: CTL1008H NOTE: Students who have previously taken CTL1008H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL3030 H

This course examines a number of theoretical perspectives on literacy, learning and instruction, exploring their implications for work with students in primary/junior/intermediate classrooms. Topics include reading comprehension, beginning writing instruction, use of media and technology to teach literacy, and sociocultural influences on literacy learning. Students will carry out an action research project on a literary-related topic. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL1009H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL3031 H

This course explores ways to bring children, cultural diversity and literature together in an interactive manner. Stories - whether traditional folktales or contemporary multicultural works - not only help define a child's identity and understanding of self, but also allow others to look into, appreciate, and embrace another culture. Class discussions revolve around an annotated bibliography of articles and books concerned with multicultural children's literature prepared specifically for the course and designed primarily for teachers in mainstream as well as ESL (English as a Second Language) and heritage language classes. The practical aim is for teachers to learn how to take advantage of the cultural diversity and interests that children of varied backgrounds bring to the classroom and to explore themes in folklore in order to open up the world of literature to all their students. The focus is to develop strategies for engaging students in classrooms in meaningful dialogue about diversity using the medium of personal interaction with the multicultural text. Throughout the course, we focus on how to encourage students to share their own cultural stories and "border cross" from one world to another. Particular emphasis is placed on the relevance of multicultural children's literature to minority students' self-esteem and literacy formation and to the school's relationship to minority and majority communities in addition to its relevance in confronting issues of human rights and social justice. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL1010H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL3032 H

This course addresses theories of writing instruction and assessment that influence current classroom practice. Connections between theory and practice will be explored in terms of what it means to be a writer and a teacher of writing. Issues such as the teaching of writing conventions, writing assessment, sociocultural influences on students' writing, and the teacher's role in guiding student writing will be examined.


CTL3033 H

This course explores the contributions that quantitative and qualitative research methodologies have made and continue to make to literacy research. The overall goals of the course are: (1) to acquaint students with literacy research methodologies, as well as exemplary literacy research studies that have employed these methodologies; and (2) to examine the types of questions for which various methodologies are well suited, together with standards for assessing the quality of literacy research that uses the methodologies. Case study research, discourse analysis methods, experimental and quasi-experimental design, ethnographic research, survey research, and formative and design experiment research methodologies will be examined. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL1805H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL3034 H

New Literacies: Making Multiple Meanings is a graduate seminar for masters and doctoral students interested in exploring issues and research literature in the field of literacy. This course takes up the notion that literacy is not singular, but multiple and ideological: diverse social practices that are embedded in local contexts. The course is designed as a collaborative inquiry into uses and associations that 'literacy' has in particular educational projects and contexts. Using a seminar format, we will look at theoretical and empirical literature as well as examples from practice to explore social functions of literacy in work, home, and school settings, with an eye toward how these conversations and ideas can be useful for researching, theorizing and teaching in our own areas of interest. We examine new and historical developments in New Literacy Studies, multiliteracies, multimodality, critical literacy, as well as practitioner and activist traditions and other works that considers literacy in relation to critical, social, political, technological, and educational factors.


CTL3035 H

This course focuses on critical literacy and the theories that underpin it. Throughout the course participants are asked to explore issues raised by critical literacy in relation to their own circumstances, particularly as these pertain to educational issues within society. This course challenges participants to develop critical questions with application to personal/professional contexts. Video clips of interviews with renowned scholars in literacy studies form the basis of this interactive course. Major questions discussed throughout the course are: - What is literacy? - What is critical literacy? - What is the history of critical literacy? - What is so critical about critical literacy? - What are the theoretical underpinnings of critical literacy? - How do critical literacies converge and diverge with multiliteracies? - What does critical literacy look like in practice? Graduate students will be asked to generate additional critical questions that contribute to individual or collective critical inquiry projects such as a critical literature review, a thesis research project or a curriculum analysis that investigates burning questions about critical literacies. Note: Students who have taken CTL1799H Special Topics: Critical Literacy in Action are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL3036 H

This course focuses on the pragmatics of expressive writing in a range of pedagogical settings. Students will experience the ways in which a range of styles and modes of expressive writing operate in various prose forms including personal narratives, arguments, evaluations, interviews, and reports. Students will consider the implications of this expressivist pedagogy for educational practice from elementary to post-secondary learning. Students will work both independently and collaboratively. Assessment will be portfolio-based.


CTL3410 H

The course will be built around a series of six two week class units. In the first class of each unit students will view a film after which, with the film still fresh in mind, they will have a first discussion of the film and issues it raises. For the next class students will watch a second film on the same topic from a short list supplied, read contemporary reviews for both films, read assigned monographs or articles related to the historical period or subject matter of the films and prepare a short critique based on the films and readings. The second class in each unit will then review the critiques and discuss the films in light of insight afforded by historians or other scholars. Students will also prepare a course paper. Note: Students who previously completed HSJ1410H are prohibited from taking this course.


CTL3797 H

An individualized course linking research and theory in SLE with practical fieldwork supervised by a professor. Credit is not given for the fieldwork per se, but rather for the academic work related to it. Academic assignments related to the field work are established collaboratively between the student and professor supervising the course, and evaluated accordingly, in a manner similar to an individual reading and research course (e.g., CTL 3998H). A student wishing to propose a Practicum course must prepare a rationale, syllabus, and bibliography for the course, and obtain the written approval of a supervising professor and of the graduate coordinator in SLE one month prior to the start of the academic term in which the course


CTL3798 H

Specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing on topics of particular interest to the student. While course credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic. A student wishing to propose an Individual Reading and Research course must prepare a rationale, syllabus, and bibliography for the course, and obtain the written approval of a supervising professor and of the graduate coordinator in SLE one month prior to the start of the academic term in which the course


CTL3799 H

This course will focus on theory, research and practice in the use of computer technologies in second language education.


CTL3799 H

Nearly all workplaces utilize and even require communication to get things done. Communication plays a central role in achieving business goals, accomplishing day-to-day institutional tasks, and maintaining smooth operations. In Canada and all over the world, workplaces are becoming more culturally and linguistically diverse. A huge proportion of workers utilize at least one language which is not their native language in order to carry out their work. In this course we will investigate a wide variety of questions and topics related to second language speakers and learners in the workplace. What is workplace communication? What impact do the following factors have on the conversations that occur in the workplace? - second language ability - sociolinguistic competence - intercultural communication - one's institutional role (e.g., employee, employer, supervisor, entry-level worker) - type of workplace (e.g., medical, legal, university, warehouse, construction, etc.) - types of speech events that occur We will use sociolinguistic tools to understand workplace settings and to investigate what makes for successful multicultural/intercultural workplace interactions.


CTL3799 H

This course examines the intersection of sociolinguistics, second language acquisition (SLA), and second language education (SLE). Students will become familiar with the distinctions between macro- and micro- sociolinguistics, interlanguage- and second-language-variation, and Type 1 and Type 2 variation and will gain an understanding of the ways in which sociolinguistics overlaps with and distinguishes itself from discourse analysis and pragmatics. Sociolinguistic examples used throughout the course will focus primarily on English and French as second languages and clear implications for SLA and SLE will be explored within each weekly


CTL3799 H

This fully online course offers a survey of the use and perspectives toward online technologies relating to language and literacies education. Applications and research of language and literacy based teaching and learning in the online environment, related to all levels of education, are examined and also we will be collaboratively developing one community of practice (CoP) within the course, as well as participating within another CoP of your choice (related to your professional or academic interests). I have found that this structure facilitates people’s integration and understanding of the material. Additionally, a goal of the course is for you to experience and reflect on the online experience as a learner, which can subsequently be useful for your future experiences either teaching or learning in online or blended contexts. The course is conducted online using a discussion environment built at OISE, called PEPPER. All the course material will be accessible through this environment, which also has a variety of other communication tools within it.


CTL3799 H

This course first surveys the recent history of TBLT, from its beginnings as an offshoot of communicative language teaching and ESP, through operational proposals for task design to motivate learning and interaction, and up to current cognitive processing proposals for researching (and implementing) decisions about task design, task sequencing, and learner profile analysis. The emphasis then moves to a description of research paradigms, and theoretical motivations for them, for researching the effects of TBLT on learning and performance using a variety of units of analysis. Finally, larger implementational curricular design decisions are considered, such as syllabus design and the design of criterion reference achievement tests.


CTL3799 H

Le but de ce séminaire est d’examiner, à la lumière de différents courants d’études sur les minorités, le cas spécifique des minorités francophones au sein des espaces nationaux et internationaux. Ce séminaire porte sur les thèmes du pluralisme, de la diversité et des processus de minoration au sein des instituions sociales (États, fonctionnariat, professions médicales et juridiques, associations, etc.) et éducatives (écoles, conseils scolaires, etc.) dans la francophonie. Il porte aussi sur les méthodes de recherche empiriques servant à étudier ces phénomènes en sciences humaines et en sciences sociales. Enfin, il inclut un volet pratique sur le travail scientifique.


CTL3799 H

William Shakespeare is the single most significant cultural icon in the literary tradition of the English-speaking peoples. Shakespeare is considered to be the corner-stone of “cultural literacy”; this is a position he was awarded in the 19th century when the Romantics and Victorians displaced ancient authority with the supposed voice of the people which sprang from the sullen earth of Warwickshire to sing hymns at Heaven’s Gate. Today, Ontario high-school students study his canonical writing. This course has three components: first, we consider the biography of The Bard; second, we study the emergence of his reputation in the 1760s and its skyrocketing importance since then; and, third, we look at the ways in which Shakespeare’s plays have been imbricated in the school curriculum as well as the popular culture of Ontario through school, amateur, and professional theatrical productions.


CTL3799 H

This course explores the roles that educational technology can play in teaching, learning, and conducting research in second-language contexts. Through exploration, experimentation, collaboration, and reflection, the course investigates the links between information technology - including multimedia applications and Internet- based communication - and second-language education. .


CTL3799 H

This course examines the nature and acquisition of the L2 lexicon, its interaction with the L1 lexicon, the roles of incidental and intentional learning, lexical learning strategies and the relative merits of various techniques for teaching vocabulary. In addition, there will be discussion of the concept of word, the multi-faceted nature of word knowledge; complementary and interacting aspects of receptive and productive vocabulary; corpus studies of vocabulary use in written and spoken discourse; and the assessment of general or specific lexical


CTL3799 H

This course is designed for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal educators and professional practitioners and examines Aboriginal (FNMI) perspectives on language, culture, and identity while looking at how this knowledge can inform teacher and professional practices to the benefit of all learners. In relation to developing cuturally relevant and responsive curriculum, pedagogies and professional practices we will explore some of the tangle historical, soci-cultural and political issues. We will also develop an understanding of FNMI peoples as a complete civilization (a complete way of being in the world) that inlcudes the complex interplay of various aspects of civilization such as culture, literacies, language, arts, architecture, spiritual practices, and philosophical themes. Educators and professional practitioners will come away with enhanced critical thinking skills and active engagement with the issues through discussions and hands-on learning opportunities in order to move forward and be able to create more inclusive, fulfilling learning environments in both urban and rural contexts.


CTL3799 H

This course is designed for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal educators and professional practitioners and examines Aboriginal (FNMI) perspectives on literacies grounded in understandings of Land (capital "L") while looking at how these literacies can inform teacher and professional practices to the benefit of all learners. In relation to developing culturally relevant and reponsive curriculum, pedagogies and professional practices we will explore some of the various literacies and ways to support literacy success in classrooms. We will explore culturally aligned texts, stories, and oral narratives together with symobllically rich themes that support literacies of land as living and emergent. Educators and professional practitioners will come away with enhanced critical thinking skills and active engagement with the issues concerning literacies through discussions and hands-on learning opportunities in order to move forward and be able to create more inclusive, fulfilling learning environments in both urban and rural contexts.


CTL3799 H

A course designed to permit the study (in a formal class setting) of specific areas of second language education not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. (This course does not fulfil the purpose of CTL3798, which is normally conducted on a tutorial basis.)


CTL3799 H

This courses explores the nature of language: its rule-governed structure, variety and universal characteristics; the way it is acquired by native speakers and additional language learners; its role in society, in creating, sustaining, and enhancing power, and in informal and institutional education. The aim of the course is to consider (i) language awareness and use in first, second, and foreign language education; (ii) the special need for language awareness in L2 contexts; and (iii) the role of language awareness in teacher development and program administration. Students will learn key linguistics and applied linguistic concepts related to language education: a) the basic building blocks of language - phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, discourse; b) language variation and language use, the notions of “Standard English,” dialects, registers, and languages of wider communication, pidgins and creoles; c) competence and performance; d) first and second/additional language acquisition; e) written and spoken language, literacy and orality. f) the importance of experience and observation; g) language practice in social settings; h) language learning and teaching; i) minority language education; j) language and culture.


CTL3799 H

This course introduces students to the history of literacy in Western Culture, beginning with the Ancients (especially the role of Christianity - "the religion of the book") and progressing to the creation of compulsory school systems in the third quarter of the 19th century. This course demonstrates how the advance of literacy was as much the result of social policies of surveillance and control as it was the product of individuals' yearning for intellectual freedom. The history of literacy cannot be reduced to a potted history of schooling since, prior to 1870, most people did not go to school and most literates acquired this skill outside a formal educational setting. The interplay between learning and living is at the heart of this course.


CTL3799 H

The use of film as a kind of "teaching aid" is steadily increasing at all levels of schooling. This course foucuses on how film depicts history - and also how film distorts history. It is important for teachers to know the difference between the study of history and its cinematic representation. Understanding film as both entertainment and a money-making business provides a way of investigating the construction of visual literacy. Viewing films, and discussing them in relation to these issues, forms the core of this course.


CTL3799 H

This course addresses the influences of community, home, school, other institutions, and cultural heritage on language acquisition and language use. Social and educational implications of language variation are adressed, particularly as they relate to langauge policy and social and linguistic change. Factors such as gender, ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic backgorund are studied as they relate to language use and perception. The current status of different language minority groups is considered, and related cultural and pedagogical issues are raised. Students will gain an understanding of basic concepts, findings, issues, and research methods in sociolinguistics as they relate to second and foreign language learning and teaching. They will investigate in depth a sociolinguistic topic, and will obtain hands-on experience in the use of sociolinguistic techniques for the description of language in society as it pertains to second language use,


CTL3799 H

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundation in the breadth of possibilities for researching the second language classroom. The course is structured to capture this breadth methodologically, theoretically, contextually in terms of program models, and in terms of research domain. As much as possible, the course pairs “how-to” readings with exemplars of second language classroom research. Based on the interests of students enrolled in the course, we can agree to adapt the syllabus at the beginning of the semester to narrow or shift our focus. By the end of this course, participants are expected to: - Articulate the relationship between theoretical perspective, research design and methods in the study of second language classrooms; - Use course and other readings to critique an exemplar of second language classroom research; - Formulate a research(-able) question of interest to the participant; - Use course and other readings to develop a research proposal.


CTL3800 H

The research on second-language teaching and learning in classrooms will be examined critically. Theoretical issues, research methodology, and substantive findings will be discussed with a view to implications for the conduct of future research, research directions, and teaching practices in second-language classrooms.


CTL3805 H

This course will examine several forms of linguistic diversity at the individual and community level as well as their impact on language and identity construction. Through the class, students will discuss and understand the emerging notion of plurilingualism as distinct from multilingualism and analyze it from three different scientific points of view: cognitive, sociological/sociocultural and pedagogical. The course will adopt a global perspective in investigating language diversity and its implications in different geographical areas and historical times. The course is at doctoral level but it is open to Master’s students (with permission of the


CTL3806 H

This course will examine aspects of second language learning (SLL) from the perspective of a sociocultural theory of mind. Key concepts from sociocultural theory, for example zone of proximal development (ZPD), scaffolding, private speech, and mediation will be considered as they relate to SLL. Relevant writings of Vygotsky, Leont’ev, Cole, Donato, Lantolf, van Lier, Wertsch and others will be read in depth.


CTL3807 H

For thesis students (M.A., Ph.D., or Ed.D) preparing to do empirical research on second language learning, instruction, and/or curriculum, this course reviews and provides experience with relevant techniques for data collection (e.g. focus groups, interviewing, verbal reports, observation, discourse analysis, questionnaires, tests); data analyses (e.g., coding, profiling, summarizing, reliability and verification checks, validation), and addressing ethical issues in research with humans.


CTL3808 H

This course examines theory and research on the role of instruction in second language acquisition. The central issues to be addressed are the extent to which different types of instructional input and corrective feedback contribute to second language acquisition (SLA). The extent to which different language features and proficiency levels interact with instructional input is also examined alongside other learner and teacher


CTL3997 H

An individualized course linking research and theory in SLE with practical fieldwork supervised by a professor. Credit is not given for the fieldwork per se, but rather for the academic work related to it. Academic assignments related to the field work are established collaboratively between the student and professor supervising the course, and evaluated accordingly, in a manner similar to an individual reading and research course (e.g., CTL 3998H). A student wishing to propose a Practicum course must prepare a rationale, syllabus, and bibliography for the course, and obtain the written approval of a supervising professor and of the graduate coordinator in SLE one month prior to the start of the academic term in which the course


CTL3998 H

Specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing on topics of particular interest to the student. While course credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic. A student wishing to propose an Individual Reading and Research course must prepare a rationale, syllabus, and bibliography for the course, and obtain the written approval of a supervising professor and of the graduate coordinator in SLE one month prior to the start of the academic term in which the course


CTL3999 H

In this course, students will either develop their thesis proposal or discuss the analysis and interpretation of data they have collected for their thesis. The student’s research must be embedded in Sociocultural Theory and/or Activity Theory and consider some aspect of second language learning. Readings will be assigned according to the interests of the students enrolled in the course.


CTL3999 H

This course will examine several forms of linguistic diversity at the individual and community level as well as their impact on language and identity construction. Through the class, students will discuss and understand the emerging notion of plurilingualism as distinct from multilingualism and analyze it from three different scientific points of view: cognitive, sociological/sociocultural and pedagogical. The course will adopt a global perspective in investigating language diversity and its implications in different geographical areas and


CTL3999 H

A course designed to permit the study (in a formal class setting) of specific areas of second language education not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. (This course does not fulfil the purpose of CTL3998, which is normally conducted on a tutorial basis.)


CTL3999 H

This Special Topics Course will offer graduate students a thorough understanding of the conditions in which research is currently being conducted in universities, governmental agencies, school boards, or other organizations. It will help them better situate their own thesis work as graduate students and their work as research assistants in funded research, and it wll igve them some background preparation for a future academic career. The course will be designed primarily for students in the Second Language Education program, but will hopefully also attract students from other programs. Weekly topics will draw from research policies in place at the University of Toronto and at other organizations, as well as from scholarly writings addressing these topics. Week 1: Research Types and Research Design. Week 2: Research Methodology. Week 3: Research Infrastructure. Week 4: Research Ethics. Week 5: Research Integrity. Week 6: Research Misconduct. Week 7: Intellectural Property. Week 8: Research Management. Week 9: Corporatization, Commercialization and Internationalization. Week 12: Research Impact, Knowledge Mobilization, and Social Responsibility.


CTL3999 H

The Practicum in College or University Teaching is intended to serve as a capstone experience for doctoral candidates. The practicum experience provides doctoral students the opportunity to apply and integrate knowledge acquired through coursework. In clarifying and broadening career goals, the practicum experience assists doctoral candidates in discovering, developing and refining necessary competencies and skills for their proposed career objectives. Doctoral students enrolled in the Practicum will participate in a mentored teaching experience and document this experience by preparing a teaching e-portfolio. Ideally each doctoral student would have a pedagogical mentor (the Practicum instructor) and, as appropriate and possible, a content mentor (a faculty member in the discipline). Details of the Practicum will be negotiable depending on the level of experience and particular circumstances of the doctoral candidate. The goal of the Practicum is to provide doctoral students with peer and pedagogical mentorship through a teaching and/or course development experience. Note: Masters students can enroll with the permission of the instructor.


CTL3999 H

This course focuses on the nature of academic language proficiency in both first and second languages and how it can be promoted in computer-supported learning environments. These environments include computer programs designed to support aspects of academic language learning (e.g. vocabulary knowledge) as well as networks of sister classes involved in collaborative projects. The course is offered through computer


CTL3999 H

The course focuses on the instructional implications of changes in both the nature of literacy practices brought about by new technologies and the increasing diversity of school populations with respect to language, ethnicity, culture, and religion brought about by global migration trends. These changes are captured by the term multiliteracies, which refers to the fact that literacy involves much more than the linear, text-based, reading and writing skills traditionally taught in schools and also to the fact that literacy practices are enacted outside the school context by students and communities in languages other than the language(s) of instruction. The course will focus on the theoretical underpinnings of multiliteracies pedagogy and on the classroom practices that are implied by research and theory in this area.


CTL7000 H

An introduction to education techniques and the role of the teacher in implementing, evaluating and designing literacy curricula for students in grades K to 10. Additionally, the course explores methods for curriculum planning and development including practical assessment strategies. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education.


CTL7001 H

This course will enable teacher candidates to analyze the interrelated legal and ethical conditions that shape the classroom context specifically and educational change generally. The Ontario College of Teachers regulations and professional misconduct policies and procedures will be studied. Topics include leadership theories, the legal context of education, parental participation, and the influence of collegial relationships with students, parents, community, government and social business agencies upon the classroom and the school. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7002 H

An introduction to education techniques and the role of the teacher in implementing, evaluating and designing mathematics curricula for students in grades K to 10. Additionally, the course explores methods for curriculum planning and development including practical assessment strategies. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7003 H

This course examines the conceptual basis underlying teaching methods, problems, and issues related to curricula on social studies and science. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T.in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7004 H

This first year course provides supervised experience in an area of fieldwork, under the direction of faculty and field personnel. Teacher candidates are placed in partnership schools in public and separate school systems and in other settings that use the Ontario curriculum. Teacher Candidates are under the joint supervision of a field teacher on site and an academic staff member at OISE. The teacher candidates will have one placement in each of their divisions. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7005 H

In this second year course, teacher candidates are placed in partnership schools in public and separate school systems and in other settings that use the Ontario curriculum. Teacher candidates are under the joint supervision of field teachers on site and an academic staff member at OISE. Teacher candidates may have experience in one or both of their divisions. They may be placed in special education, library or specialist classrooms in their last placement. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7006 H

This course is designed to develop teacher candidates awareness of and reflection about their own professional knowledge, beliefs, values, and skills as emerging teachers in relation to classroom-based and school-based research. The following four broad themes will guide the course in interwoven and complementary ways: (1) the teacher as a reflective professional oriented towards inquiry into educational theory and practice; (2) the teacher as a moral agent who appreciates the ethical demands, complexities, and responsibilities of the role; (3) the teacher as a critical analyst of educational research; (4) the teacher as a practitioner researcher knowledgeable of conceptual and methodological approaches to the study of teaching and schooling. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary


CTL7007 H

In this course, candidates will formulate a personal policy on student assessment, develop authentic assessment tools appropriate to their teaching assignments, and assess the quality of authentic assessment strategies. Particular attention will be given to performance assessments, portfolios/e-Portfolios, self- assessment and self-evaluation, cooperative assessment, student beliefs and attitudes toward assessment, measurement of affective outcomes and professional standards for evaluating student assessment practices. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7008 H

In Ontario, the regular education classrooms are currently the placement of choice for students with disabilities. This movement toward inclusive education has occurred for a variety of reasons: legal, educational, moral and philosophical. In this course, teacher candidates will consider special education from the perspective of the regular classroom teacher. From this perspective, special education is not “special” but is effective teaching that benefits all the students in the class. It focuses on adapting instruction to meet the diverse needs of the students in the class. The course will concentrate on how instructional assessment can be used to calibrate instruction to meet the needs of individual students, how to accommodate learner differences and how to collaborate with other professionals to meet the provincial requirements for inclusion of students in teaching, programming and assessment. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program. Students may not take HDP2280


CTL7009 H

Through this course, teacher candidates will identify spaces in which discrimination in education is found - for example, within interactions between teachers and students; administrators and students; students and students; students and the curriculum; teachers and the curriculum; administrators and teachers; teachers and parents; parents and administrators. Discussions will focus on anti-discriminatory education in school settings. Emphasis in the course will be placed on integrating theory and practice. Discussions of practice to theory will be linked. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program. Students may not take CTL1011


CTL7010 H

In this course, teacher candidates will explore theoretical and current issues in numeracy and literacy spanning kindergarten through grade eight. Integration with other subject areas and course work will be addressed. The experiences in this course are intended to help teacher candidates bridge theory and practice, and articulate personal beliefs and experiences related to literacy and numeracy. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7011 H

This course addresses issues and developmental changes in children and the factors involved in child development. Infancy, the preschool period, early school years, intermediate years, and adolescence are covered. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7012 H

In this course, teacher candidates will explore theoretical and current issues in secondary education spanning Grade 9 to 12. The course will also explore the issues surrounding Grades 7 and 8 and the transition into secondary schools. The experiences in this course are intended to help teacher candidates to bridge theory and practice, and articulate personal beliefs and experiences related to issues in secondary education. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7013 H

An introduction to education techniques and the role of the teacher in implementing, evaluating and designing arts curricula for students in grades K to 10. Additionally, the course explores methods for curriculum planning and development for visual arts, music and physical education. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7014 H

This course will explore the complexity of schools and place of the school in the community. Practical issues around lesson planning, unit planning, classroom management, and the class as a community are addressed. This course provides a practical and conceptual introduction to the teaching of students and will introduce student teachers to many of the philosophies, methods, and materials relevant to teaching. It provides opportunities to develop an understanding of the process of becoming a teacher, insight into the role of ethics in research, and to acquire the skills and attitudes to be a thoughtful and reflective practitioner. In these respects, this course enables the student teacher to build a foundation for continuing professional growth as an individual and as a member of the teaching community.


CTL7015 H

This course is paired with the 2nd year Practicum course (CTL7005H), and serves as a bridge between academic course work and practical experience. This course therefore attends to both theory and practice. Course goals include strengthening instructional skills, building a repertoire of teaching strategies, deepening understanding of the complexities of teaching/learning, and refining a vision of teaching. This course is designed to prepare the teacher candidate for a professional teaching/education career, whether that be employment in the public or non-traditional setting and/or post-graduate studies.


CTL7016 H

This course deals with the use of computers in schools as tools for students in curricula other than computer studies. The role that technology can play in school restructuring is examined. Also included is a discussion of issues related to teacher training and classroom implementation, and the ways in which technology applications can influence the curriculum content and process. The major emphasis is on determining the specific education need (of students, teacher, curriculum objectives or subject area) that computer technology


CTL7020 Y

This course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching English in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). Written, visual and virtual texts such as literature, media and technology define the content. Topics include teaching textual forms, writing processes, classroom language and media/technology. Teacher candidates will read, write, view, talk and represent their understanding of text to reflect on English/Language Arts practices and theories, as preparation for informed curriculum planning and implementation. The content, methodologies, evaluation and skill requirements in English/Language Arts will be linked to Ontario Ministry of Education guidelines. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7021 Y

This course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching History in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). A variety of teaching/learning strategies, assessment techniques and approaches to curriculum design will be explored. Adapting the history program to meet the needs of a diverse student body will be highlighted. Course methods include demonstrations, interactive sessions, small group activities and field studies. Assignments will require candidates to develop practical applications and to link theory and practice. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7022 Y

This course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching Mathematics in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). A variety of teaching/learning strategies, assessment techniques and approaches to curriculum design will be explored. Course methods include discussion of objectives, teaching methods, instructional materials, testing and evaluation, and selected topics from the Ontario Ministry of Education Guidelines. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7023 Y

This course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching Biology in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (Grades 7-12). The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts. Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and to creating an inclusive and motivating learning environment. Throughout the program, efforts are made to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools. This course is normally open only to students in the M.T. in Elementary and Secondary Education program.


CTL7099 Y

The Master of Teaching Research Project is designed to provide a deeper exploration of the interrelationships between educational theory, research, and practice. The overarching goal of this project is to engage students in an in-depth analysis of issues related to curriculum, teaching, and learning through systematic research. The MTRP has value both for students who are intending to pursue a career in classroom teaching, and for students who are planning to pursue doctoral studies. The Project involves the identification of a research problem, a literature review, data collection, data analysis, the construction of a formal report, which is published in a public online repository, and a formal presentation. As part of this process, students develop a variety of research-related skills, including the ability to formulate effective research questions, conduct interviews, review the academic and professional literatures, analyze data, and


HDP1241 H

Does early childhood education make a difference? Are "day care kids" different from those cared for at home? If there are differences, what are they? For whom are those differences, if any, meaningful? Are those differences, if any, lasting? How do we know? And, who cares? This course will explore these issues; we will examine a variety of early childhood programs, historical and contemporary, and the research and evaluation studies related to them. Students will select and critique a published evaluation study on aspects of early education/care, and design their own evaluative study of an element of an early education/care program of personal interest. ("Early childhood" = up to 9 or 10 years of age.)


HDP1260 H

A critical analysis of the Canadian legal system's interface with children and youth. Individuals who intend to work with children in educational, clinical, or community settings will develop a working knowledge of legislation affecting children, the interface between legal and developmental/psychological issues, children's rights, and risks and opportunities for children in the context of today's legal system. Domains include education, health, family law (custody and access; protection), and criminal law. Specific topics include Ontario's child protection system, the Young Offenders Act, special education, issues in custody and access assessment, children's and youths' understanding of the legal system, etc. Note: This is not intended as a law course, but to acquaint psychology and education practitioners with relevant legal issues.


HDP1290 H

This course is designed for graduate students from social sciences and education departments. The course is aimed at equipping students with preliminary knowledge and skills necessary for appraising and conducting causal comparative studies. A major emphasis will be placed on conceptualizing causal questions, comparing alternative quasi-experimental research designs, and identifying the assumptions under which a causal effect can be estimated from quasi-experimental data. Students will become familiar with statistical techniques suitable for evaluating binary treatments, concurrent multi-valued treatments, or time-varying treatments. These include propensity score matching and stratification, inverse-probability-of-treatment weighting (IPTW) and marginal mean weighting, regression discontinuity design, the instrumental variable (IV) method, and directed acyclic graphs (DAG), many of which are comparatively new to most social scientists. This course is a prerequisite for HDP1291 “Structural Equation Modeling”. HDP 1288 “Intermediate Statistics” or equivalent is a prerequisite.


HDP1291 H

This course is designed for graduate students from social sciences and education departments. Path Analysis uses simultaneous equations to represent causal relationships. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), also called Causal Modeling or LISREL, adds to this approach a strategy for modeling measurement errors. Although the primary goals were to detect or evaluate causality and, in the meantime, to account for measurement error in observations, more often than not, the estimated relationships are correlational rather than causal. This course introduces Rubin's causal model that sheds new light on SEM-type questions. A major emphasis will be placed on conceptualizing causal problems, comparing alternative research designs, and identifying the assumptions under which path coefficients are causal effects. In addition to learning the standard SEM techniques including path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and general structural equation modeling, students will be introduced to causal inference theories and techniques including propensity score matching and stratification, inverse-probability-of treatment weighting (IPTW), selection models, and the instrumental variable (IV) method. The course is aimed at equipping students with preliminary knowledge and skills necessary for appraising and/or conducting empirical research about causality. Note: Students who have previously taken CTL2011 are prohibited from taking this course. Prerequisite: HDP1288 or equivalent.


HDP1299 H

This course provides a comprehensive overview of language acquisition and development from before birth to adolescence. Topics covered include speech perception, word learning, syntax development, discourse, communicative competence, atypical language development, and theoretical explanations in developmental psycholinguistics.


HDP2283 H

The identification and the intellectual, social, and emotional development of gifted children and adolescents; educational programs in regular and special classes.


HDP2288 H

This course is designed to develop students' awareness of, reflection about, and evaluation of their own professional knowledge and skills in relation to classroom-based assessment and remediation of generic learning skill deficits in diverse student populations. Discussion of instructional and assessment methodologies will be followed by experience applying these methodologies to various content areas in the curriculum.


HDP3209 H

This course examines current research on psycholinguistics including syntax, semantics, and pragmatics with an emphasis on their relations to literate competence. Topics considered are language development, literacy development, writing systems and the role of linguistic processes in thinking and instruction.


HDP3224 H

This course will provide an advanced examination of proactive behavioral and cognitive-behavioral approaches used with children for the remediation of skill deficits associated with defiance, aggression, impulsivity, depression, and anxiety. Students will be required to develop treatment approaches to case presentations and/or develop clinical workshops for use with parents, teachers or other intervention agents. Note: Open to PhD students and SCCP. Others by permission of the instructor.


HDP3225 H

In this course we consider emotional, cognitive and behavioural development in children in the context of high risk environments. We examine recent theory and research on developmental trajectories or pathways. We consider within-family variations in development. High-risk environments include problematic family contexts, negative peer and community influences. Note: Open to students in the PhD program in DPE and SCCP. Others by permission of the instructor.


HDP3226 H

This course focuses on current research and methods in human development and applied psychology. The course emphasizes the integration of research methods, statistics, and research content. The focus is on the thesis preparation process. Students will develop research expertise through work on their own projects and will broaden their understanding of the field through seminar discussion. Prerequisite: One graduate course in quantitative analysis, and permission of the instructor.


HDP3229 H

After a review of theoretical perspectives on emotion, we will discuss cognition-emotion interaction and the development of this interaction over the lifespan. Contemporary approaches to modeling development will be introduced, along with some grounding in the neural basis of emotion. Emotional constraints on cognition and learning will be a key focus. Clinical implications will be discussed in relation to the development of personality and psychopathology.


HDP3230 H

In this course, we will explore how narrative is read and understood by people in schools and elsewhere, and how narrative is written, in fiction and other genres such as biography and autobiography. We aim to understand the psychological components of writing narrative literature and the psychological responses that occur during reading. We will also discuss empirical work on responses to literature, and on the effects of reading and writing.


HDP3282 H

This course examines current research and theory on the psychology of critical thinking and explores the philosophical and empirical foundations of the concepts of critical and rational thinking. The framework for the course will be provided by recent research in cognitive, developmental, and educational psychology. Individual differences and the development of critical thinking will be discussed as a context for evaluating educational efforts to foster critical thinking.


HDP3292 H

The purpose of this course is for students to refine their skills in psychoeducational assessment by assessing children with a variety of complex learning and social and emotional problems. Traditional psychoeducational assessment techniques are combined with a systemic approach to assessment of cognitive, educational and social/emotional functioning of children. Assessment is seen as embedded in a counselling process in which the children, parents and teachers are assisted to understand the nature of the children's difficulties, how they learn best, and their adaptive strategies for coping in the social milieu. Students will undertake two assessments over the course of the academic year using the facilities of the Counselling and Psychoeducational Clinic. Note: This course is intended for students in School and Clinical Child Psychology. Others by permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: HDP1216 and one of HDP1218, HDP5271, or HDP5284.


HDP5271 Y

This full-year course is designed to bring theory and practice together in the area of reading, spelling, and writing difficulties. A practicum component involves implementing a theory-based assessment and remediation model (with students of all ages), report writing, and consultation with teachers and parents. The course is intended to be useful in the training of psychologists. NOTE: This course is normally limited to students in the PhD program in SCCP and DPE. Others by permission of the instructor.


HDP5281 H

A survey of current empirical evidence and theoretical models of reading disability, focusing on basic research on reading disability deriving from cognitive and developmental psychology. Individual differences in reading acquisition will be discussed as a context for understanding reading disability. Students will conduct an in-depth analysis of a specific research problem relevant to reading disability and/or reading acquisition.


HDP5298 H




HDP5298 H

A course designed to permit study (in a formal class setting) of specific areas not already covered in the courses listed in the current year. For further information, see the course schedules available in early March.


HDP5298 H




HSJ1411 H

Each class involves two components: first, viewing a selected film (or a part of a film); and, second, discussing this cinematic work in relation to the main themes of the course – “Truth “?; “Power/Gender”; “Class Struggle”; and “Other-ness’. Students will be expected to contribute to the in-class discussions and to exhibit a knowledge with other films (from a list provided by the instructor in the course outline, handed out to all students in the first meeting). In addition, a bibliography of “suggested reading materials” (listed in the “Bibliography” and provided to students in the course outline at the first meeting) will be relevant to in-class discussions. In the course of the study-program, students will be expected to frame an essay-topic and to present the instructor with an essay-outline in order to complete the essay within the time-frame provided by the School of Graduate Studies – papers must be presented to the instructor no more than ten days before the grade-submission deadline so that the instructor has an opportunity to read and grade the essays of all the students in the class.


HSJ1416 H

This course analyses the interplay of gender, race, class, ethnicity and religion in the history of education in Ontario from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. The course is delivered through computer- mediated conferencing.


HSJ1419 H

Central issues in historical writing - theory and philosophy, bias and representativeness - are considered together with modes of presentation, forms and methods of research, and styles of argument. Students are introduced to the main issues in current educational history through an intensive reading of selected, exemplary texts. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which arguments are developed in social-historical studies on schooling and education. In this way, the influence of critical theory, discourse analysis, feminism, post-modernism, and post-structuralism on recent debates within the field is discussed with reference to the central problems of history of education. NOTE: TPS1419 is compulsory for all students in the M.A., Ed.D., and Ph.D. programs who will be developing a thesis topic in the History of Education.


HSJ1422 H

The history of the family as it relates to child-rearing and education in Great Britain, France, the United States, and Canada.


HSJ1432 H

This course investigates knowledge, knowing, and knowing subjects as they are represented in modern and postmodern educational theory and practices. The course is designed to facilitate educators' self-reflection on questions of learning and teaching, constructions of knowledge and knowers, and the implications of power/knowledge. Selected topics include: the impact of constructivism on teaching; problems of epistemic dominance and marginalization (Whose knowledge counts?); and representations of learning (styles; ability/disability).


HSJ1433 H

This course focuses on the tension between freedom and authority as it affects both education and society at large. Traditional and contemporary philosophical theories of freedom and authority provide a context for examining the competing claims of libertarians (or progressivists) and authoritarians in education. This course does not presuppose extensive background in philosophy.


HSJ1436 H

Recent debates in social theory, philosophy, and education regarding the meaning of modernity will be discussed. Theories of modernity and "post-modern" critiques of them will be reviewed. Experiences around the world of various types of crisis (human rights, ecological, cultural) may be considered.


HSJ1438 H

This course explores the theoretical and practical aspects of democratic approaches to pedagogy by critically discussing selected writings of some of the major 20th century philosophers of education and educationists (e.g., John Dewey, Paulo Freire, Jane R. Martin, A.S. Neill, Bertrand Russell, bell hooks, and Iris Young). The exploration of this topic will also include a critical discussion of case studies arising from real classroom contexts.


HSJ1440 H

This course is an overview of the field of philosophy of education. It focuses on selected major thinkers, such as Plato, Rousseau, Wollenstonecraft, Dewey, Peters, and Martin, with attention given both to classic texts and to contemporary developments, critiques, and uses of ideas from these texts. Emphasis is placed on the kinds of epistemological, ethical, and political questions that comprise the core of philosophy of education and that need to be addressed to the classic and contemporary literature.


HSJ1447 H

This course will address the philosophical problems arising from the use of modern technology and its implications for theories of education and educational practices. The primary focus of the course will be on the nature of the relationship between humans, society, and technology. Among the issues that may be considered are: the nature and validity of technological determinism as a model of explanation of personal and social change; technological causation; the conceptual distinctions (if any) between humans and machines; the social, political, metaphysical, ethical, and epistemological commitments involved in the introduction and use of technology in education; the distinctions between human understanding and artificial intelligence; problems arising from the use of computers in education; and related philosophical issues in education. The selection of topics will depend on the interests and backgrounds of the members of the seminar.


HSJ1452 H

This course consists of specialized study, involving regular preparation of papers and tutorials under the direction of a staff member, focusing on specialized topics of interest to individual students and faculty members that are not provided for in seminar courses. Practical field experience may be included as part of the course. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be related to a thesis


HSJ1453 H




HSJ1461 H

In this course, students will be presented with a series of readings and discussion materials on the history of various technologies that had a major impact on education. Specific topics may include the history of paper, the book, photography, radio and television, printing and reproduction machines, and of course, history of computer technology - all in how they relate to Education. .


HSJ1461 H

This course examines in depth a topic of particular relevance not already covered in the regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session schedules.


HSJ1461 H

This seminar will explore recent developments in the theory and practice of feminist art, focusing specifically on its liberatory and pedagogical potential. Topics to be explored will include: the 'male gaze' and the feminist oppositional gaze; the role of the spectator/spectatrix in creating meaning and 'getting the message'; feminist art as activist art; gynocentric aesthetics versus feminist rejections of aesthetics; and the role of the museum or gallery and documentary film in education.


HSJ1461 H

This course will examine Canadian engagement with the Holocaust, its aftermath, and the ways in which the Holocaust has historical impact on Canadian law, memory and educational and curricula thought.


HSJ1461 H

Notions of race have never been far from the centre of Canadian historical experience. This course will explore the historical origins and development of race as an idea and how race has been used to define community and order a society undergoing change. In these regards the course will focus on several periods in Canadian history during which issues of race played a particularly important role in defining citizenship and shaping the social, political and educational enterprise. Finally the course will discuss race in schools and strategies for examining race in the classroom.


HSJ1461 H

After decades of neglect, consciousness has emerged as the "hot topic" of the 1990s in philosophy of mind, psychology and cognitive science. But what is consciousness? What do the "new" theories of consciousness contribute to theories of learning? How is consciousness involved in imagination and emotion; and how are these implicated in learning? Is consciousness an evolutionary and/or developmental phenomenon? Where does consciousness fit in children's developing theories of mind? Must consciousness be conceptual in nature? Do computer-mediated learning environments distort a learner's conceptual consciousness of the non-computer world? Can a computational theory of mind account for consciousness? These are some of the questions to be addressed primarily in the context of 1990s literature. Final selection of topics will be determined by the participants' various research interests.


HSJ1461 H

This course will examine the history of racism and genocide in the twentieth century. By focusing on the social history and implications of the Holocaust, classes will explore how learning about the past can be utilized to promote critical thinking about the problems of racism and prejudice currently confronting society. Oral history methodology will be utilized as a means for exploring and teaching these events.


HSJ1461 H

Important and controversial issues - such as destreaming, back-to-basics, student evaluation, parental involvement in schools, school governance and teaching training - continue to dominate the contemporary schooling agenda. These issues are not new to Canadian education: in fact, debate over these crucial educational matters has raged for decades, and has occasioned dramatic changes in educational structures and practices in the past. This course will allow participants to select from a number of contemporary schooling issues of interest and explore some of the past conditions and connections, in order to develop further insights on the present-day debates.


HSJ1461 H

This course considers the work of major educational philosophers (Plato to Kant) and looks at their work in the perspective of the social and historical context in which it was written.


HSJ1461 H




HSJ1465 H

Applied ethics are philosophical questions that result from real-life moral situations, usually in specific domains such as medicine, business, and education. The institution of higher education (primarily universities) has always raised applied ethical questions, such as those regarding freedom of speech and research, compensation for intellectual work, choices in student admissions, obligations to the larger society, and academic integrity. Contemporary influences on higher education are also introducing a raft of new ethical quandaries: changes to the conduct and dissemination of research, free massive online courses, corporate university partnerships, restructuring of academic positions, rising tuition, and the dilution of degree integrity due to such phenomena as for-profit universities, just to name a few. This course will examine a number of these ethical issues using a blend of empirical and theoretical, academic and non-academic literature. No background in philosophy is necessary to take this course. It is expected that this course will be of interest to OISE students pursuing all graduate degrees in sociology/social justice, philosophy, higher education, leadership, and adult learning.


HSJ1465 H

This course investigates the origins and nature of consumerism as a prevalent ideology. Consumer goods and consumer values have taken a central place in modern society, and all too often the West has been more successful at spreading consumer goods and values than espoused values of democracy. Recent events clearly demonstrate the problematic political, economic, and educational implications of the prevalence of consumerism. In this course we explore implications of consumerism from the perspective of thinkers including Karl Marx, Max Weber, Martin Heidegger, John Dewey, Jane Kenway & Elizabeth Bullen, Susan Bordo, Vandana Shiva, bell hooks, Alex Molnar, Benjamin Barber and Jean Baudrillard. Topics include: consumerism as more than shopping but rather an entire ‘way of being-in-the-world’; the shift from the political importance of production to consumption; advertising and branding; the ‘McDonaldization’ of the world; distinctions between public/private and citizen/consumer; the symbolic/semiotic character of commodities. We then analyze the effects of ‘school commercialism’ as it redefines students as consumers and challenges the democratic aims of schooling.


HSJ1465 H

This course will critically examine popular approaches to character education and their diverse philosophical underpinnings within the broader literature on moral education. We will explore analyze their (often hidden) assumptions pertaining to the boundaries of the moral realm and how character fits within it, the possibility of moral knowledge and objectivity, the role of the teacher, the nature of learning in this area of education, and the implied conceptions of democracy. The assumptions will then be explored in practical terms of how character education raises difficult moral and political issues, such as the legitimacy of character education in a society with deep commitments to cultural diversity, dealing with controversial issues, the advisability of teacher neutrality, tensions between home and school, hidden curriculum, the danger of indoctrination, relation to political ideologies such as neo-liberalism, ways of facing/avoiding systemic social issues such as racism.


HSJ1465 H

Without any doubt Paulo Freire is considered as the most prominent philosopher of education and educator since John Dewey. His work and actions have influenced educational thought and practice in all parts of the world. This seminar focuses on aspects of his work, how it has been received and critiqued, and how it has been modified and applied. The seminar will be divided into three parts: (i)A critical examination of two of Freire’s major texts: Pedagogy of the Oppressed (his first major work) and Pedagogy of Freedom (his last major work) with a focus on the interconnection between epistemology, ethics, politics and pedagogy, and his criticism of neoliberalism. (ii) A critical examination of the major criticisms of his work: rationalist epistemology; lack of emphasis on race and gender; lack of consideration of ecological issues and Eastern thinking; limits of critical pedagogy; lack of consideration of the psychological components of liberation; his understanding of history. (iii) A critical examination of the application of his work. Notwithstanding criticisms, his work has been utilized in various areas and fields (pedagogy, science education, higher education, educational administration and leadership, spirituality and inter-faith, peace education, literacy, research, activism , engagement of ‘alienated youth’, health education) as well as modified to several contexts in various parts of the world. The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the major concepts in Freire’s work, some of the major critiques of his thinking, as well as the possibility of the application of his work to a variety of contemporary contexts. Following Freire’s major insight the seminar will focus on understanding, critical examination, and possibilities adopting a dialogical format of inquiry.


HSJ1465 H

This course examines in depth a topic of particular relevance not already covered in the regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session schedules.


HSJ1465 H

This course offers an overview of theories and philosophies of emotion and affect, focusing particularly on the shift from locating emotion in the individual to feminist and poststructural accounts that understand emotions in their cultural, historical, and political contexts. We will read key thinkers including Raymond Williams, Brian Massumi, Lauren Berlant, Sandra Bartky, Frantz Fanon, Eve Kosovsky Sedgwick, Arlie Hochschild, bell hooks, and Sarah Ahmed. Questions include: How have emotions, affect, and feeling been defined and theorized? How might theorizing emotion and affect inform new accounts of the public sphere and political philosophy, ethics, and epistemology? What is at stake in how we conceptualize emotions and affect in relation to subjectivity, public and private, race, class, gender, and agency?


HSJ1465 H

The course is an introduction to pragmatism as a philosophical approach and its use in addressing contemporary issues in educational theory and practice. It will focus on the work of four of the classical pragmatists of great and continuing influence on thought in a variety of fields - C.S. Peirce, William James, John Dewey and George Herbert Mead. Emphasis will also be placed on the meaning, or practical use, of a pragmatic approach to present day educational controversies.


HSJ1465 H

This course offers an overview of philosophical concepts of community and a pluralistic approach to the question of what is held “in common”. Within Philosophy of Education Studies, as well as within educational research, scholars and educators frequently invoke the concept of community. Yet only too rarely do scholars have the opportunity to explore conceptions of community within intellectual, philosophical, and historical/cultural traditions and the ethical and moral values associated with particular invocations of ‘community’. Students in this course will engage directly with the broad range of concepts of community within diverse traditions of the theoretical humanities. Topics will include: communities under empire; utopian communities; the Enlightenment community; communities of friends and enemies; communities and anti- colonialism; imagined communities; communities of the gift, expenditure, friendship, and affirmation; and communities of pleasure. Course aims include: situating diverse concepts of community in their historical moment; analyzing their pedagogical features; and examining in detail their contributions and limitations with respect to contemporary educational practices.


HSJ1465 H

With few exceptions, educators and educational theorists regard indoctrination as the antithesis of acceptable educational practice. Fearing charges of indoctrination, educators want to be clear about the distinctions between teaching and indoctrinating and philosophers of education have responded with hundreds of scholarly articles and books focused on clarifying this troublesome term. In spite of the term’s continuous use in educational and public discourse, scholars have not agreed on the work “indoctrination” is intended to do as a normative, conceptual tool. In this course we will explore the fractious discourse on indoctrination as it unfolded from the early days of John Dewey’s Progressive Education Movement to the present. We will “trouble” the discourse’s modernist/mainstream epistemology by examining its key features through lenses of emerging post-structuralist/feminist epistemologies, which notice the under-interrogated political and moral constituents of knowledge construction practices.


HSJ1465 H

This course is designed to facilitate a broad acquaintance with some contemporary themes in philosophy of education discourse. As such, it will function as a combination of an individual reading course and seminar format. Each student will identify a particular research focus and will read extensively for papers relevant to that focus published in the last (approximately) 15 years of the Philosophy of Education Yearbook and a list of relevant journals. Syntheses of the most interesting four papers and evaluative comments pertaining to their relevance to the student's interest will be shared electronically with other participants on a weekly basis. Participants will also meet on a weekly basis to discuss their findings, and, at least once in the year, to provide an overall synthesis to date. The course should be of particular use to students writing theses in the field of philosophy of education and needing to survey the literature in depth concerning their possible thesis topic. Permission of the instructor is required.


HSJ1465 H

This course examines diverse theorizations (e.g. continental and feminist philosophy, queer theory, critical disability studies) of how particular bodies are constructed as 'normal' and other constructed as 'deviant bodies'. Phenomenological and cultural/political forms of resistance to coercive normalization are analysed.


HSJ1465 H

This course considers some of the ways in which human nature and conduct are conceived in psychology and education and the consequences of action based on such conceptions. It could be considered a course in philosophy of mind as applied to educational theory and practice. The course begins by considering psychological thought in a very long run historical perspective. Teleological, mechanistic and evolutionary approaches to nature are compared in the light of their influence on psychological and educational theory. A second part of the course focuses on the mind/body problem and its practical ramifications in more modern work. A third part considers some conceptual issues relating to how individuals and specific forms of change, such as thinking, learning and developing, are conceived.


HSJ1465 H

This course will use ethical theory and philosophy of education to discuss the ways in which education is an ethical enterprise that both applies and challenges traditional conceptions of ethics. Rather than focus on specific ethical dilemmas faced by educators and educational policy makers or researchers, this course will consider questions about education and/as ethics in general, such as: How do ethical theories ground our concept of education? To what extent is education susceptible to classical explanations of ethical obligation or normativity? Is the purpose of education to create moral persons? What is the nature of the relationship between students and teachers? Texts will include works by major Western philosophers from Plato to Levinas as well as contemporary thinkers.


HSJ1465 H

This seminar addresses divergent philosophical approaches to understanding the relationship of bodies, minds, and emotions. The course examines the political, epistemological, and ethical implications of how bodies are imagined, experienced, and represented historically and in contemporary discourse and culture. Readings will draw on philosophies ranging from phenomenology and historical materialism, to post-structuralism and psychoanalysis.


HSJ1465 H

Conversations about knowledge, knowing and knowers are central to educational theory, practice, and research. Knowledge concepts (discourses), processes (games), evaluation (deconstruction), and knowledge dispositions (performances) are the mainstay of educational work. This course addresses these conversations by first articulating and, then, troubling, conventional wisdom on such matters as; truth claims and 'regimes of truth', the nature and limits of objectivity, reliability, indoctrination, constructivism, and the authority and situatedness of expertise and experience. In a postmodern era what counts as knowledge is virutally up for grabs. In an era of globalization the stakes as to what--and whose--knowledge counts are higher than ever. The aim of this course is to familiarize ourselves with some of these most compelling conversations regarding knowledge and knowers in order to appreciate the work we do as educators and learners, the benefits and burdens of producing knowledge, and the political ramifications of privileging some forms of knowledge (and knowers) over others.


HSJ1465 H

Globalization, while a comparatively recent phenomenon, profoundly impacts the context and aims of education. Is it advancing or undermining the democratic aims of education? How has this discourse shaped educational theories and practices, and political debates and philosophies? This course examines the relationship between education, democracy and globalization within a neoliberal, consumer-driven and market- oriented environment. We will aim to both broaden and focus the meanings of such key terms as ‘democracy’ and ‘globalization’ and compare contrasting theoretical conceptualizations and analyses. Topics will include: the impact of the knowledge economy, marketization as a dominant paradigm, cosmopolitanism, and global environmental educational movements. Students will gain a rich vocabulary and analysis of the effects of globalization on aims, processes and institutions of democracy and education, and will have opportunities to apply these debates to specific independent research interests. Readings will include, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, Benjamin Barber, Vandana Shiva, Francis Fukuyama, and Arundhati Roy.


HSJ1465 H

This course is a short and preliminary introduction to the writings of Karl Marx (also of Friedrich Engels, his lifelong collaborator), the roots of their work in the philosophy of the German romantic philosopher Hegel, and in Marx’s own early Hegelian period. The impact which this phase has had on the development of the critical school (Frankfurt school of social theory, Institute of social research- Horkheimer and Adorno, Marcuse, Habermas) will be considered. Contemporary themes will be integrated into the discussion (critiques of imperialism, Third world perspectives, Latin American liberation theology, and critiques of capitalist globalisation). Lenin’s and Rosa Luxemburg’s work will be considered, as alternatives and background to the debate.


HSJ1465 H

This course examines food as an area of social justice and philosophical education. In the most general terms, students will develop and enrich critical understanding of the social, cultural, political, and ethical contexts of food. The course will take an interdisciplinary approach in covering a range of topics, including: the hidden curriculum of school food; food democracy; the ethics and aesthetics of eating animals; sustainability; the organic movement; race, class, and gender; poverty and inequity; food marketing and advertising; globalization; urban revitalization through community gardening; and educational change through school gardening. In addition to examining these topics through a variety of sociological, philosophical, and literary texts, we will also critically analyze several food-related films. This course also entails a service learning component where students will conduct research at a Toronto area food bank, community garden, or a community food program with a social justice vision in order to learn how change can be carried out through the growth, preparation, distribution, and consumption of food.


HSJ1465 H

This course aims to take up the tensions that are generated as educators prioritize diversity and social justice mandates within institutional contexts (school classrooms, school board and ministry of education governance) that produce effects of power, (discipline, normalization and subjectivation) which are antithetical to diversity foci. Seminar discussions will privilege classroom settings/dilemmas and will be informed by scholarship drawn from philosophical (ethics, epistemology) feminist, anticolonial, queer and critical race theory


HSJ1465 H

This course will examine philosophical issues pertaining to the interrelationship of gender, ethical frameworks, and educational theory. Focus will be on recent feminist analyses of gender as a social construction, insights into how this contstruction is manifested and maintained, and critiques of and alternatives to mainstream ethical theory.


HSJ1465 H

This course examines the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze to explore connections and distinctions between his philosophical pedagogy and that of other post-structuralist thinkers. Through a wide range of Deleuze’s texts, including those co-authored with Felix Guattari, the course will map the development of his thought from structuralism and metaphysics to later works on ethics, immanence, and the history of philosophy. Readings by other key thinkers will form a backdrop to or critique of his work, including writings from Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, and post-colonialism. This overview introduces students to Deleuze’s unique philosophical project, its contextual development, and its value for rethinking questions of pedagogy, politics, and the contemporary world.


HSJ1465 H

This course examines the relation between literature and philosophy, in the context of the philosophy of education, through various literary texts, artworks and philosophic texts. In order to offer a wide theoretical perspective the course presents a selection of the most significant perspectives on this relation from Plato and Kant to the present day. The idea behind the theoretical study is to reflect upon the role that artworks and philosophic texts have played in traditional pedagogies and how they may be envisaged as animating a potential pedagogy. Through our diverse readings and engagements with aesthetic works, the course invites its participants to explore i) how ideas about literature and the arts have always been at the heart of the Western philosophic enterprise; ii) how artworks and literary texts have consistently been employed to bolster or to challenge philosophic schemas; and ii) how the friction and competition between artistic and philosophic reflections envisions a specific form of the master-disciple relationship.


HSJ1465 H

This course considers some of the conceptual and practical issues that have arisen in the attempt to develop a science of education. It focuses on theories of learning and development, in particular, although other areas are considered as well, such as the way teaching and schooling are understood and institutionalized. Prominent theories and approaches will be presented and considered critically with an eye to developing more coherent and practically adequate approaches to education.


HSJ1471 H

This course examines philosophical dimensions of contemporary critical issues in educational practice. Issues selected vary each session (examples are: standardization and a common curriculum; common schooling and school choice; teacher testing and professional learning; safe schools and "zero tolerance" policies; and controversial issues in the classroom). The aim is to integrate our understanding of these issues as they are being played out in practice and uncover and analyze some of the underlying philosophical questions and


HSJ1472 H

This new offering introduces students to key issues regarding teaching philosophy to a range of ages and in a variety of contexts. One course aim is to allow students to tie philosophical thought more directly to teaching and learning in schools in a way that allows them to improve both student learning and their own teaching. Open to graduate students and teacher candidates in all disciplines, attention will be devoted to pedagogical practices such as differentiated instruction and teaching learners of diverse abilities and ages as it relates to philosophicalthought. Literature from the Philosopy for Children (P4C) will be engaged and compared with strategies for teaching the adolescent learner. Candidates working in the publicly funded school system will also have an opportunity to explore topics and issues of particular relevance to their own educational aims and interests. Graduate students will be provided with opportunities to advance their own research through independent studies while benefitting from direct contact with teach candidates; teacher candidates will benefit from the expertise and research of graduate students. Course methods will include lectures, discussions, debates, small group activities, a library session, presentations on specific thinkers and foundational/reoccurring philosophical concepts and debates, and guest speakers from key areas of philosophical specialization. Important critizues of the philosophical canon from postmodernism, feminism, and postcolonialism will be raised throughout. A secondary aim of the course will be to allow teacher candidates to connect philosophy with their own approach to educational and cultivate a philosophy of education that will increase student engagement and learning.


HSJ1900 H

An examination of the possibilities, promises, and problems with which sociological perspectives can enliven and enrich the understanding of the educational process. This course provides an introduction to and integration of theoretical and practical aspects of sociology in education.


HSJ1900 H

Ce cours a pour but d'examiner les possibilités, les promesses et les problèmes avec lesquels les perspectives sociologiques peuvent animer et enrichir la compréhension du processus éducatif. Il fournit une introduction aux aspects théoriques et pratiques de la sociologie de l'éducation, et leur intégration.


HSJ1902 H

An introduction to basic research methods appropriate for teachers and other students of sociology in education. General consideration will be given to technical problems with emphasis on the underlying research process and its practical implications for schools.


HSJ1903 H

This course will serve as an introduction to the major concepts and issues in education from both a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach, that values social justice education. Students will be introduced to major questions and debates in educational theory and praxis, focusing specifically on issues that define the areas of emphases in HSSSJE: - Anti-racism, critical race theory and Indigenous studies - Feminism, gender, and queer studies - Cultural and philosophical contexts in education (including francophone studies) - Aesthetics, communication and media studies - Democracy, ethics, disability studies, and social class The course, which is normally taken in the beginning of a master level program in HSSSJE, will assist students to understand how a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach from the humanities/social sciences perspective that honors social justice education, contrasts with other disciplinary approaches and what this perspective contributes to the examination of major educational concepts and issues. Students will develop an understanding of the central questions, debates, and controversies from diverse intellectual traditions of the humanities and social sciences, and explore multi- and interdisciplinary studies in education, with a focus on history, philosophy, sociology and social justice education. ( Effective May 1, 2014, this course will be a required core course for all new HSSSJE students. )


HSJ1905 H

This course will provide practical training in qualitative sociological research in education. Stages of qualitative research (such as identifying a topic, organizing projects and writing proposals, gaining access, collecting data by in-depth interviews and participant observation, using documents, analysing data, and writing reports) will be covered. Students will do a small project using techniques of interviewing and participant observation. Issues such as ethics, working with school boards and other agencies, and feminist research will also be raised. The course is most suitable for students who have some background in sociology but who have not previously conducted ethnographic or other forms of qualitative research.


HSJ1906 H

The course will be offered as the final and culminating course for Masters of Education students in HSSSJE who wish to complete a project synthesizing their educational experience with their professional, intellectual, and/or community goals. The students will design, develop and conduct individual or group projects in social justice education. Depending on students’ goals and aspirations, projects may include (but are not limited to): • a research project similar in form & scope to a Major Research Paper; • a substantial literature review; • a portfolio; • a curriculum unit; • a website, blog or digital media project; • a policy intervention; • a documentation of alternative educational programs or practices; • the organization of a media, community or school event; • an artistic representation • or a project of the student’s design


HSJ1909 H

The premise on which this course is based is that social equity and environmental sustainability are necessarily and inextricably intertwined. After clarifying key concepts such as environmental justice, we will analyze the current unsustainable way in which Canada as a society, as well as the world as a whole, are organized, including climate change, water and food access and quality, energy generation and consumption, BMO,s, population growth. We will also explore positive examples of how to deal with these issues.


HSJ1911 H

Ce séminaire a pour but d'explorer, d'un point de vue sociologique et historique, et grâce à un ensemble de données théoriques provenant aussi bien de France, d'Angleterre que du Canada, la mise en place de l'éducation inclusive. Cette forme d'éducation, constituée dans le but de répondre aux "besoins" d'élèves désignés comme "spéciaux", eut son heure de gloire à une époque donnée, soit avant qu'émergent les courants d'intégration et d'inclusion scolaire. La situation des écoles de langue française en Ontario sera également analysée au regard de cette question.


HSJ1912 H

This course will introduce students to central approaches, themes and questions in the work of Michel Foucault. We will discuss the relevance and utility of his work by examining how a number of researchers in education have made use of it. Students will also be able to explore the implications and usefulness of Foucault's work for their own research.


HSJ1915 H

Learning not only takes place within the institutions of formal education, but through a myriad of practices of popular culture. Considering popular culture as inherently pedagogical, this course will address the learning that takes place through various everyday cultural practices and consider its implications for the work of educators. Practices to be considered include television, film, radio, digital media, musical performance, as well as aspects of material culture such as forms of dress, games, and toys.


HSJ1919 H

This course builds on the assumption that social justice and environmental sustainability are intertwined. It explores the interconnections among environmental problems and capitalism, patriarchy, racism, and other forms of domination. Participants will be encouraged to analyze the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of (in)justice in diverse contexts within frameworks that recognize the salience of social identities, including but not limited to class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and ability. Participants critically examine contrasting theoretical perspectives, practices, and examples of environmental justice advocacy and action. These investigations will assist course participants to deepen their understandings and hone their practical abilities to respond to social, economic, and environmental issues in multiple institutional contexts -- schools, workplaces, unions, social service agencies, NGOs, and so on.


HSJ1921 Y

The first half of the course provides a theoretical analysis of anti-racism and anti-oppression education and issues for students, educators, and staff interested in the pursuit of anti-racism and anti-oppression education in the schools. The second half focuses on practical anti-racism strategies aimed at institutional change in schools, classrooms, and other organizational settings. The intention is to ground theoretical principles of anti- racism education in the actual school practices of promoting educational inclusion, social change and


HSJ1922 H

This seminar reviews selected sociological theories and perspectives on race and ethnicity. The emphasis is on emerging debates and investigations on the interrelation of race, gender, and class in the construction of social and historical realities and identities. It explores the implications of these advances for curriculum and pedagogical practices.


HSJ1923 H

This course explores the extent of racialized violence, provides a theoretical approach for understanding it, and considers appropriate anti-violence strategies. How should educators respond to the world post 911? Are we in a new age of empire? What is the connection between historical moments of extraordinary racial violence and our everyday world? How do individuals come to participate in, remain indifferent to or approve of violence? This course offers researchers and educators an opportunity to explore these broad questions through examining historical and contemporary examples of racial violence and the law.


HSJ1924 H

This seminar explores the significance and implication of education (as broadly defined) to the discourse of modernization and development in Africa. The course begins with the interrogation of 'African development' from an African-centred perspective. There is an examination of various theoretical conceptions of 'development' and the role of education and schooling in social change. A special emphasis is on the World Bank/IMF induced educational reform initiatives and the implications ofr 'authentic'/alternative development. The seminar will attempt to uncover the myriad interests and issues about Africa, including contemporary challenges and possibilities. The course critically engages the multiple ways of presenting current challenges of 'development', the interplay of tradition and modernity, contestations over knowledge production in 'post- colonial' Africa, and the roles and significance of Indigenous/local cultural resource knowledges, science, culture, gender, ethnicity, language, and religion for understanding African development. Other related questions for discussion include social stratification and cultural pluralism, formulation of national identity, political ideology and the growth of nationalism, and the search for peace, cooperation and social justice. Although the course basically uses African case material, it is hoped our discussions will be placed in global/transnational contexts, particularly in looking at themes common to many Southern peoples contending with, and resisting, the effects of [neo] colonial and imperial knowledge.


HSJ1925 H

Ce séminaire examine diverses formes du savoir indigène et marginalisé dans des contextes locaux et globaux et les implications pédagogiques de ce savoir sur le changement éducationnel. Au départ, nous offrirons un bref aperçu sur le processus de production, d'interrogation, de validation et de dissémination du savoir dans divers contextes sociaux. Il existe présentement une critique à l'égard des conceptions théoriques liées à ce que constitue un savoir 'légitime' et comment un tel savoir est produit et disséminé sur les plans local et global. Ainsi, l'accent sera particulièrement mis sur la validation des épistémologies autres que occidentale et la contribution de ces épistémologies à travers des perspectives multiples et collectives de voir et interpréter le monde. Parmi les sujets étudiés, on compte: les principes et les formes du savoir indigène, les rapports de pouvoir, les différences sociales et, finalement, l'identité et la représentation dans le processus de production du savoir indigène. Nous nous pencherons aussi sur l'appropriation culturelle et l'économie politique de production du savoir; le savoir indigène et la science de l'éducation; le savoir indigène, la mondialisation et la modernité, le savoir indigène et le changement social. Afin de bien saisir les implications pédagogiques du savoir indigène, nous utiliserons du matériel pédagogique dérivé de plusieurs contextes sociaux de divers pays du monde.


HSJ1925 H

This seminar will examine Indigenous and marginalized knowledge forms in transnational and global contexts and the pedagogical implications for educational change. It begins with a brief overview of processes of knowledge production, interrogation, validation and dissemination in diverse educational settings. There is a critique of theoretical conceptions of what constitutes 'valid' knowledge and how such knowledge is produced and disseminated locally and externally. A special emphasis is on the validation of non-western epistemologies and their contributions in terms of offering multiple and collective readings of the world. Among the specific topics to be covered are the principles of Indigenous knowledge forms; questions of power, social difference, identity, and representation in Indigenous knowledge production; the political economy of knowledge production; Indigenous knowledges and science education; Indigenous knowledge and global knowledge; change, modernity, and Indigenous knowledges. The course uses case material from diverse social settings to understand different epistemologies and their pedagogical implications. This course is not open to students who have previously taken SES2999 "Special Topics: Indigenous Knowledge and Decolonization: Pedagogical Implications."


HSJ1926 H

How do we come to know who we are and how is this knowledge emplaced, raced and gendered? For educators, these questions underpin pedagogy. In focusing on the formation of racial subjects and the symbolic and material processes that sustain racial hierarchies, educators can consider how dominance is taught and how it might be undermined. Drawing on recent scholarship in critical race theory, critical geography, history and cultural studies, the course examines how we learn who we are and how these pedagogies of citizenship (who is to count and who is not) operate in concrete spaces--bodies, nations, cities, institutions. This course is about the production of identities--dominant ones and subordinate ones in specific spaces. It is taught from an educator's and a researcher's viewpoint. As an educator, the compelling question is how we might interrupt the production of dominant subjects. As a researcher, the question is how to document and understand racial formations, and the production of identities in specific spaces.The course begins by exploring the racial violence of colonialism, of periods of racial terror (lynching, the Holocaust), and of the New World Order (in particular, the post 911 environment, and the violence of peacekeeping and occupations) as well as state violence. In all these instances, law often has a central role to play in producing and sustaining violence. It is through law, for example, that nations are able to legally authorize acts of racial violence and legal narratives often operate to secure social consent to acts of racial terror. Through a feminist and anti-racist framework, we explore how racial violence is sexualized and gendered, and how it operates as a defining feature of relations between dominant and subordinate groups. The course examines how racial violence is linked to empire and nation building, and how individuals come to participate in these racial and gendered social arrangements.


HSJ1927 H

This course will tackle three broad themes: (1) migration, nation, and subjectivity; (2) globalization and its discontents; (3) empire and subalternity. It will engage with theoretical and empirical studies of discourses and structures that constitute the formations and relations of subjects, cultures, spaces, institutions, and practices. The analytical and methodological approach will be both disciplinary and inter-disciplinary, drawing from the fields of sociology, history, geography, anthropology, and education, while mobilizing insights from ethnic, feminist, queer, cultural, and postcolonial studies. The interpretive lens will be simultaneously panoramic, comparative, and focused that will attend to the shared and unique conditions of local-global, north-south transactions.


HSJ1929 H

The course offers interdisciplinary approaches to critical inquiries into the historical, socio-cultural, and political forces that shape our knowledge about peoples of Asian heritage in Canada and in the diaspora. It foregrounds the intersections of race and ethnicity with other indices of difference, such as gender, class, migration, sexuality, ability, language, and spirituality in local, national, and global contexts. It engages with theoretical, empirical, and methodological issues related to inquiries on Asian Canadians, and draws out implications for intellectual, educational, and policy arenas.


HSJ1930 H

This course explores histories of racism, displacement and legal disenfranchisement that create citizenship injustices for Indigenous peoples in Canada. It aims to highlight a set of decolonizing perspectives on belonging and identity, to contest existing case law and policy, and to deconstruct the normative discourses of law, liberalism and cultural representation that govern and shape current nation-to-nation relationships between Ongwehoweh (real people) and colonial-settler governments. The course is centered on exploring the possibilities, challenges and contradictions raised by resurgence strategies and reparation involving citizenship injustice from an anti-racist, anti-colonial and indigenous-centered perspective.


HSJ1931 H

What sets of intellectual and intercultural relationships exist between settler, diasporic, and Indigenous populations in Canada, and what possibilities, challenges, and limitations surround the building of these alliances in both theory and research? This course will examine these questions by exploring scholarly, theoretical, and research-based frameworks centred on the creation, maintenance, and rejuvenation of Indigenous-settler relationships and organizing. The objective is to engage with and assess these frameworks from a critical, Indigenous, and anticolonial perspective, and to understand the strengths, divergences and interconnections surrounding each of them. Through films, readings, group discussions, and guest speakers, emphasis will be placed on current and future research and mobilizing, considering in turn the implications for political, historical, and educational change.


HSJ1951 H

Récemment, plusieurs initiatives ont été mises en oeuvre pour donner une plus grande place à la participation parentale/ familliale/ communautaire dans l'éducation des enfants. Dans plusieurs pays, des réformes éducatives sont entreprises afin de rendre les administrations scolaires davantage responsables et redevables face aux communautés. En ce sens, la communauté, notamment par l'action des parents, est invitée à jouer un plus grand rôle à l'école. Cette situation est issue de la critique d'un modèle scolaire considéré trop uniforme, peu enclin à répondre à des situations particulières et inapte à remplir son rôle en ce qui concerne la transmission des savoirs de base jugés prioritaires. Certains voient dans cette «mise en marché de l'éducation», un simple rôle d'apparat pour les parents et le retour à un schéma compétitif entre les élèves. Prenant en compte ces tensions et représentations différentes au sujet des rôles des parents, de la communauté et de l'école, ce séminaire a pour but d'examiner, grâce à des textes riches aussi bien du point de vue théorique qu'empirique, la question à savoir comment le système en place pourrait mieux prendre en considération les visions et les attentes de multiples communautés de parents/tuteurs.


HSJ1951 H

This course investigates changing relations within and between schools and communities (however defined). We will review sociological and historical studies of community and discuss the ways in which different notions of "community" and forms of diversity have been employed by parents, teachers, administrators, trustees and others in struggles over the form, content, and outcomes of schooling. Students are encouraged to draw on their own experiences as parents, teachers, students, trustees and/or community activists.


HSJ1954 H

This course examines the processes through which certain groups are marginalized and explores some strategies for resistance. The first section explores: the meaning of subjectivity and its relationship to political practice, experience, knowledge, and power. Section two looks more closely at gender, sexuality and race, exploring here both the concepts we have used to understand domination and the practices of marginalization themselves. Section three considers three strategies of resistance: writing, cultural production, and politics.


HSJ1956 H

This course will analyse how cultural meanings are produced, interpreted, legitimated, and accepted and/or rejected in educational settings, including but not limited to schools. Critical perspectives from feminism, Marxism, and poststructuralism will be explored to consider how culture has been investigated and taken up in/through sociology, cultural studies, and studies of education and schooling.


HSJ1957 H

"Doing Disability" brings us to a central premise of disability studies--disability is a space of cultural practices done by and to people. From this premise, it follows that we are never alone in our bodies and so disability represents the material fact that bodies, minds, and senses always appear in the midst of people. Assuming that disability is done and re-done through everyday discursive practices, disability studies turns to a range of interdisciplinary work that enriches the potential to challenge our taken-for-granted understandings of social and political life. Theorizing how we do disability, even in the everyday of the (our) classroom, provides the occasion to critically engage contexts, such as education, mass media, and the built environment, as they intersect with issues of identity and difference; embodiment; narrative; the constitutive structuring of ordinary, agentive, viable, life at their opposites. Orienting to disability as a social accomplishment of everyday life is a way to examine how versions of what counts as human are culturally organized and governed. Made by culture, disability is a key space of practices where we might theorize culture's makings. In this course, we explore social models and theories of disability, so as to develop a critical understanding of disability's appearance in everyday life and to work to open ourselves to question how these new non-medicalized ways of knowing disability might influence pedagogical structures and practices.


HSJ1958 H

This course explores socio-cultural theories of the self and subjectivity. Turning to interpretive sociology, informed by cultural and disability studies, we will theorize the self as social and as located in educational scenes of its appearance, including its appearance in empirical studies that regard the self as a problem. Through lecture and seminar discussions, we will uncover taken-for-granted conceptions of the self-as-a- problem in education. The course aims to reveal the complex version of self as a cultural production while questioning individualized versions of self currently produced by dominant fields’ of inquiry in education such as developmental and epigenetic psychology.


HSJ1959 H

This course examines a range of arguments concerning the ways in which theories of culture, communication and education impact our understanding of the everyday world. The course attempts to survey literature which place discussions of culture, communication and education in the foreground. The course will attend to the ways in which culture, communication and education are not settled terms but are terms deeply implicated in how we maneuver the everyday social world.


HSJ1961 H

Exploring spirituality within the context of education will create new pathways of understanding for educators and students. By weaving spirituality into learning and knowledge creation discourse, educators and learners can foster spiritual growth while strengthening the connections between knowledge and the process of schooling. The main objective of this course, therefore, will be to create an educational space that develops students' spiritual interconnectedness in relation to learning, schooling and the community at large. Spirituality is very important in many people's lives, and valuing the spirituality of students means valuing their uniqueness as individuals, regardless of race, gender, creed, sexuality or ability. Spirituality has been silenced and marginalized as a discourse or embodied knowledge in the academy. The course will survey the literature that examines spirituality and knowledge production from a wide range of perspectives, such as from various Eastern, African, indigenous traditions, and from both religious and secular traditions. The course will examine the intersections between issues of spirituality and environment, health, colonialism, gender, sexuality, the body and so on.


HSJ1982 H

This course examines the impact of the changing situation of women in society on educational processes and curriculum. Gender is understood to operate together with a range of other 'diverse' identities such as race, class and age. Among topics covered are gender, biography, and educational experience; patterns of educational access and achievement; gender as an organizing principle in school and classroom practices and peer relations; teachers' careers; feminist pedagogies and strategies for change.


HSJ1989 H

Various discourses, theoretical frameworks and ideological proclamations have been employed to analyze, criticize and interrogate everyday lived experiences of black peoples. This course examines the multiple oppressions and social representations of black women using a black feminist theoretical framework. Part of the course will be devoted to black feminist theory -- a theory developed out of black women's experiences and rooted in their communities. The course will also examine the following issues among others: strands of feminisms with particular emphasis on feminisms as advocated by the visible minorities; the divergences and similarities of black feminisms; and the heterogeneous nature of black women's experiences. The course will be sociological and historical in nature and will examine the intersections of race, class, gender and


HSJ1992 H

In this course, we will debate some of the key questions raised by feminist poststructuralist writers. These include the nature of power and the subject; the workings of discourse; and the status and effects of knowledge. Detailed consideration will be given to feminist poststructuralist accounts of educational practice and feminist pedagogy.


HSJ2941 H

This course provides a theoretical examination of how social inequities are being (re)produced in everyday life, namely through education. It will focus on the work and influence of sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. It will also introduce students to scholars who have since used his concepts and methodology and/or have critiqued Bourdieu. Questions of inequities are being in vivo, unveiling complex processes of inequalities taking shape through the structuring of formal education as well as through race, class, gender and other interlocking systems of oppression.


HSJ2941 H

Ce cours étudiera la construction des systèmes de stratification selon la classe sociale et le sexe dans les milieux de travail, au foyer et dans la communauté ; l'on traitera aussi de l'influence que de telles formes de stratification peuvent avoir sur les processus éducatifs, ainsi que sur le rôle de l'école et des enseignants en reproduisant et en changeant ces formes sociales. On évaluera l'étendue des possibilités économiques et éducatives de même que la mobilité tant au Canada que dans d'autres sociétés industrialisées.


HSJ2942 H

An introduction to critical contemporary studies of relations between the realms of learning and work. Formal, nonformal and informal learning practices will be examined, as will paid employment, household labour and community service work. Special attention will be devoted to the connection between underemployment and lifelong learning.


HSJ2996 H

This course introduces students to Marxism and (neo)-Marxist theories of politics, society, and education. We will explore historical materialist methods of inquiry and use them to understand current social (and environmental) justice issues, investigating the relationship between political economic conflicts and educational change. Key concepts include: global capitalism and imperialism; exploitation and oppression; class consciousness; intersectionality and standpoints; alienation; ideology and hegemony; education and work; eco-socialism; critical pedagogy; praxis.


HSJ2996 H

Without any doubt Paulo Freire is considered as the most prominent philosopher of education and educator since John Dewey. His work and actions have influenced educational thought and practice in all parts of the world. This seminar focuses on aspects of his work, how it has been received and critiqued, and how it has been modified and applied. The seminar will be divided into three parts: (i)A critical examination of two of Freire’s major texts: Pedagogy of the Oppressed (his first major work) and Pedagogy of Freedom (his last major work) with a focus on the interconnection between epistemology, ethics, politics and pedagogy, and his criticism of neoliberalism. (ii) A critical examination of the major criticisms of his work: rationalist epistemology; lack of emphasis on race and gender; lack of consideration of ecological issues and Eastern thinking; limits of critical pedagogy; lack of consideration of the psychological components of liberation; his understanding of history. (iii) A critical examination of the application of his work. Notwithstanding criticisms, his work has been utilized in various areas and fields (pedagogy, science education, higher education, educational administration and leadership, spirituality and inter-faith, peace education, literacy, research, activism , engagement of ‘alienated youth’, health education) as well as modified to several contexts in various parts of the world. The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the major concepts in Freire’s work, some of the major critiques of his thinking, as well as the possibility of the application of his work to a variety of contemporary contexts. Following Freire’s major insight the seminar will focus on understanding, critical examination, and possibilities adopting a dialogical format of inquiry.


HSJ2996 H

This course will focus on empirical and interpretive methodologies for historical and historically-oriented cultural studies research. Students will explore an array of intellectual approaches to history, with a particular emphasis on the contributions and interventions of 'post' inflected frameworks from poststructuralist and postcolonial studies. They will examine a variety of primary source materials, such as archival documents, oral history interviews, and visual images, and analyze them as texts situated within particular temporal and spatial contexts. The course will provide students with intellectual tools necessary to conduct research in their own areas of interest, to substantiate their arguments with empirical data and analysis, and to critically locate their work in relation to other historical and cultural studies scholarship.


HSJ2996 H

This course addresses selected major concepts and issues in social justice education. The course begins with a consideration of “social justice education” as itself a complex concept, addressing various historical and geopolitical contexts. The course will proceed to focus on selected major concepts and related issues, specifically: “citizenship”, “race”, “gender” and “class” in the context of social justice education. While the concepts will be considered in terms of defined meanings, an emphasis on the intersectionality of these meanings will inform readings and discussions. Literature that addresses theoretical and analytical premises that shape these terms as concepts, and selected case studies and policies that address related issues, will be addressed in the course. Multiple distinctions and challenges associated with these concepts and related issues will be explored, with a view to analyzing implications for knowledge production in education, within and beyond classroom situations.


HSJ2996 H

Special Topics in Humanities, Social Sciences and Social Justice Education will examine in depth topics of particular relevance in HSSSJE research not already covered in regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced and described in the schedule of courses.


HSJ2996 H

John Dewey was one of the most influential philosophers in North America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His work is highly relevant in both philosophy and education, especially with the resurgence of interest around the world in philosophical pragmatism. Dewey's work also represent one of the most condensed and thoughtful contributions to educational philosophy. This course is an introduction to Dewey's thought focusing primarily on the educational, social, and aesthetic aspects of his philosophy. It will attempt to consider Dewey's thinking in depth and its practical application and implications. In pursuing Dewey's ideas we will read a number of his texts in the order in which they were written so we can see the way his thinking developed . We will not read much in the way of secondary literature, although you are encouraged to sample it privately, since this will be one of the few chances you will have to read the primary texts in detail and form your own opinion of his work. We will also consider some prominent criticisms of his work.


HSJ2998 H

Specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing on topics of particular interest to the student that are not included in available courses. This study may take the form of a reading course combined with fieldwork in community groups and organizations, or independent study of any type. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic.


HSJ2999 H

This Disability Studies Summer Institute course will provide the opportunity for students to engage in an intense interactive and interdisciplinary research based examination of the cultural production of disability in global educational contexts. We are particular committed to cultivating theoretical and practical connections between critical race, feminist, and cultural studies theory and disability studies. We will approach disability as a social phenomenon that has been engaged by various cultural practices, policies and educational procedures that need to be imagined in new ways since in the past few decades very little has changed for disabled people. The overall objective of this course is to provide students an opportunity to engage in an intense interactive and interdisciplinary research based examination of the cultural production of disability that will focus both on the crisis of exclusion and the cultural processes of inclusion.


HSJ2999 H

En partant du constat que la salle de classe ou l'école en général représente un milieu forcément hétérogène et que les élèves entretiennent des rapports singuliers face à l'éducation, nous tenterons de mettre en évidence, grâce à des recherches récentes et à l'expérience des membres du séminaire, ce que l'on peut entendre par "pédagogies de l'inclusion". De l'analyse des programmes scolaires, de leurs applications dans le quotidien aux procédés et pratiques d'évaluation, nous identifierons à partir de recherches empiriques et d'expériences de terrain decrivant, notamment, des réalités propres à des contextes minoritaires, des stratégies pédagogiques visant l'inclusion. La sociologie de l'éducation nous sera d'un réel secours puisqu'elle conduit à porter un regard analytique sur les processus scolaires et à ajuster notre pratique pédagogique en conséquence.


HSJ2999 H

Exploring women in leadership positions within the context of education will create new pathways of understanding intersectionalities and leadership practices. By weaving women’s leadership practices into learning and knowledge creation discourse, educators as well as learners will have a better understanding how various identity markers play out in leadership. The main objective of this course is to explore different leadership models from a feminist & anti-colonial thought in order to create an educational space that develops learners and educators' consciousness in relation to women & leadership. The course explores: Does one need to be in a position of authority to be a leader? What does it mean to be a women leader from marginalized communities? The course examines strategies that different women in leadership positions employ to make decisions. Ngunjiri (2010) suggests that women can transform their communities and organizations from within by choosing to work with all stakeholders by navigating through the cultural and organizational challenges in order to bring a shift of consciousness in communities or organizations. This course seeks to engage in an intellectual discussion on women and leadership and to offer insights into how experiential discourse informs women educators’ everyday leadership practices. The course will concentrate on literature that examines women & leadership; gender and leadership; women in position of authority etc and knowledge production from historical and contemporary perspectives as well as from a local and global perspective.


HSJ2999 H

This course introduces students to critical approaches to studies in education. Education is broadly conceived to include both formal and informal, micro and macro, as well as local and transnational educational endeavors. The aim of the course is to awaken and nurture the need to approach education as a space of sociological, philosophical, and historical questions. Taking a decidedly non-developmental psychology approach, the course aims to reveal educations' contentious political underpinnings. How education produces, sustains and resists forms of marginalization and dehumanization will be explored throughout the term.


HSJ2999 H

Exploring spirituality within the context of education will create new pathways of understanding for educators and students. By weaving spirituality into learning and knowledge creation discourse, educators, as well as learners, can foster spirtual growth while strengthening the connections between the learner, knowledge and the process of schooling. The main objective of this course, therefore, will be to create an educational space that develops students' spiritual interconnectedness in relation to learning, schooling and the community at large. Spirituality is very important in many people's lives, and valuing the spirituality of students means valuing their uniqueness as individuals, regardless of race, gender, creed, sexuality or ability. Spirituality has been silenced and marginalized as a discourse or embodied knowledge in the academy. In this course, we will explore the questions an dissues of spirituality and its intersections with schooling from diverse perspectives. The course will survey the literature that examines spirituality and knowledge production from a wide range of perspectives, such as from various Eastern, African, indigenous traditions, and from both regiious and secular traditions. Moreover, the course will examine the intersections between issues of spirituality and environment, health, colonialism, gender, sexuality, the body and so on. The course is intended to assist the student in becoming familiar with the current literature on spirituality and its underlying intersections with knowledge production and schooling.


HSJ2999 H

This SESE course involves practical experience in an area of environmental sustainability and social justice fieldwork with a sociology in education perspective in order to develop skills in the application of knowledge from theory and research to practical settings and problems. The SESE Environmental Sustainability and Social Justice Practicum Liaison, Dr. Njoki Wane, will serve as a practicum supervisor and instructor. In consultation with the Practicum Liaison, the student will establish a suitable placement, signaled by completion of an "ESSJ Practicum" form. For successful completion of this half course, students are required to 1/ spend 20 hours in active ESSJ fieldwork; 2/ build an annotated bibliography of readings to support the final paper; 3/ keep an observation journal for the field work which will be presented to for discussion with the instructor weekly; 6/ submit a final report at the end of the term offering a description of how the ESSJ initiatives in the field affected and/or changed the field experience.


HSJ2999 H

This course aims at discussing the emergence of early childhood sociology as a different discipline from child psychology and also as a separate discipline within the field of educational sociology. We will review the historical and sociological conditions that gave rise to a concern for the sociological study of the early childhood years. We will examine the status of the child as a recognized and thoughtful participant in and member of society by focussing on the child's ability to play the part required at school, to do what is expected by the system or to resist it, and also on the child's interactions within the family at school and with peers (looking at different socialization/interaction processes between teacher-pupil and pupil-pupil, and in society, in general). From this viewpoint, we will gain a better understanding of the social and school processes of inclusion/exclusion in which the children participate. Finally, we will review the literature to examine, among other things, what being a child means today, what the images are which are vehiculed about childhood, what the status and rights of children are and how those are lived/applied in reality.


HSJ2999 H

Through the study of various ways a culture shapes and reshapes its images of the past, this course will address the practices and consequences of historical memory on the substance of civic life. Emphasis will be placed on how different practices of remembrance may be understood as both pedagogial and memorial and the place of such practices in establishing conditions necessary to democratic life. A variety of remembrance practices are considered, including those taking the form of history texts, film and video, computer based multi-media, monuments and museums, visual art, drama, literature and poetry.


HSJ2999 H

In this course, environmental health is framed as a field of research, education, policy and advocacy endeavours that link the natural, health and social sciences with the worlds of the academy, community, business, economics, labour, governments and media. It includes gendered approaches to physical, social, cultural, economic, spiritual and societal power relationships which are multi-directional and interlinked with the health and well-being of all life. The course will help students to develop critical thinking and investigative, analytical and practical skills to better understand the constraints of scientific certainty and uncertainty in today's complex world in order to address lifestyle as well as public policy changes. The issues are framed within the broad socioenvironmental perspectives on health promotion reflected in the goals of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion -- strengthening community action, developing personal skills, creating supportive environments, helping in skills development to educate, enable, mediate and advocate. This framework stresses social issues in environmental health in contexts of gender, race, class, culture, ethnicity, age, poverty and other systems of oppression. Please note that the course features important issues around children's health and the environment which relate to fetal and childhood development. There is abundant evidence in the literature of avoidable conditions which have been identified -- such as learning disabilities, behavioural problems, attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, neurological deficits, etc., as well as cancers, asthma, allergies, related to environmental exposures at particular sensitive timing during fetal development.


HSJ2999 H

This seminar explores the influence of contemporary social theory in the formation of Disability Studies and in its contemporary expressions. We will take a diversity orientation in our analysis and explore the relations of contemporary feminist theory, queer theory, and post-colonial theory as they intersect with Disability Studies. This will allow us to develop an understanding of disability as a socio-political phenomenon. Such a development will proceed with the critical analysis of more conventional bio-medical and individualistic cultural conceptions of disability. From this foundation, the course will formulate Disability Stuides as itself a theoretical perspective that contributes to an analysis of what it means to be human individually and collectively. The course will raise a variety of equity tensions with the aim of showing how disability is an interpretive category necessary to any exploration of marginality and oppression.


HSJ2999 H

This course tries to use an ecological approach to how we should regard war and explores the many facets of social and educational interaction, including state formation, economic and trade relations, shifts to environment and ecology, changes in how people conceptualize themselves and the ways in which media, state, and creations of social and civil institutions are changed by militarism. The course begins by examining alternate ways to look at both conflict and nature and how our concepts are shaped by the analytical lenses and ways we manipulate information. The course also posits and investigates a radical approach to ecology and militarism and also environmentalism arguing against a number of commonly assumed positions.


HSJ2999 H

Technologies are an integral part of all societies. How do we define technologies? Are some technologies, such as cars, masculine and others, like washing machines, feminine? Do technologies help to define identity? What role(s) do race and class play in the formation of technologies? What role does science play in the creation and evolution of gendered technologies? This course will explore the impact of gender on technologies, the impact of technology on society and of society on technology. We will look at what science and technology have said about women and how preconceived notions about women and gender have shaped science and technology. We will be looking at these issues from a primarily 20th century Western perspective, but we will take into consideration the idea that technologies are mediated by both location and time. Students will be encouraged to look beyond the main readings to interrogate these questions in relation


HSJ2999 H

This course examines a range of ideas, concepts, debates and personalities across the black diaspora. The course is concerned with the ways in which ideas, people and politics circulate to create communities across and within national boundaries. The course is fundamentally concerned with how debates concerning the black diaspora and its boundaries have emerged since the development and formalization of black studies programs in the 1960s and 1970s.


HSJ2999 H

Gatekeeping concepts have come to frame and limit much of what we think and understand the Caribbean to be in standard academic discourse. Catchphrases spring readily to mind: strong matriarchs, female-headed households, creolisation, migration, English-speaking. Yet one might argue that while these representations tell only part - and in some cases none - of the story, they have come to stand in for - and instead of - indigenous realities and knowledges. Much of this misrepresentation also derives from the imposition of externally imposed conceptual frameworks based on assumptions that the Caribbean (like 'other' places outside of a European/North American context) provides case-studies, fodder for theorising. This course seeks to go beyond and behind these stereotypes through an intensive look at the development of and current debates in Caribbean feminist scholarship. Drawing on material from the English, Spanish, French and Dutch Caribbean as well as the Caribbean coasts of Latin America, the course will examine the intersection of race, gender, class and sexuality in a region forged in the crucible of the colonial encounter and now profoundly affected by more contemporary dynamics of globalisation. It also provides broader analytical tools for thinking through such issues as hybridity, nationalism, transnationalism. .


HSJ2999 H

This course will begin by examining the social construction of masculinities from various theoretical perspectives, including a range of feminist and postmodernist analyses. Issues of power and privilege based on ethnicity, social class, and sexualities will be explored. Specific topics related to socialization and education will include: family and culture; play, sport and recreation; private and public schooling; the "what about the boys?" question; sexual orientations and sexualities; harassment and violence; and men's political


HSJ2999 H

Courses that will examine in depth topics of particular relevance not already covered in regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced and described in the schedule of courses.


HSJ2999 H

Special Topics in Sociological Research in Education: The Cultural Production of the Self as a Problem in Education


HSJ2999 H

Cultural productions in which Indigenous peoples engage to tell stories include media, film, photography, newspapers, and written texts. This course will endeavour to understand Indigenous texts through examining media, film, and multimedia sources written and produced by Indigenous peoples (including experimental and independent productions). This course will exclusively involve literature/productions from Indigenous authors, storytellers, filmmakers, photographers, and activists whose compelling stories and productions engage in decolonizing, cultural vitalization and self-determination. .


HSJ2999 H

Ce course examinera divers aspects des questions que l'immigration soulève pour l'éducation francophone au Canada, et plus généralement pour tout système scolaire. On mettra l'accent sur les tensions entre le role de reproduction sociale, culturelle et linguistique que les écoles se sont données et leur obligation de faciliter l'accès pour toutes et tous à la réussite scolaire. Parmi les aspects de cette tension que nous traiterons on trouve: l'histoire idéologique du système scolaire francophone en milieu minoritaire; la diversification de leur population estudiantine et de leur corps professoral; les manifestations des tensions dans divers aspects du système, des politiques d'embauche à l'interaction en salle de classe; les enjeux de pouvoir et comment y faire


HSJ2999 H




HSJ2999 H

What sets of intellectual and intercultural relationships exist between settler, diasporic, and Indigenous populations in Canada, and what possibilities, challenges, and limitations surround the building of these alliances in both theory and research? This course will examine these questions by exploring scholarly, theoretical, and research-based frameworks centered on the creation, maintenance, and rejuvenation of Indigenous-settler relationships and organizing. The objective is to engage with and assess these frameworks from a critical, Indigenous, and anticolonial perspective, and to understand the strengths, divergences and interconnections surrounding each of them. Through films, readings, group discussions, and guest speakers, emphasis will be placed on current and future research and mobilizing, considering in turn the implications for political, historical, and educational change.


HSJ2999 H

This seminar is planned as a forum for the collective exploration of a particular problem as formulated: How can one be ethically understanding of and personally responsive to the words, feelings, and actions of others in ways that take account of their historical, embodied specificity and irreducibility of another person's experience? The course will explore how we may be able to deepen and conceptually sharpen how this problem can most usefully be stated, understand the issues and contradictions embedded with the problem, grasp how the problem is manifest in practices of pedagogy across a variety of social sites in which they are enacted, consider how some attempts have been made to "work within" and "work through" the dynamics which set the terms of the problem, and clarify how this problem bears on our own research, writing and teaching. The course is netiher a survey of nor an introduction to a specific set of ideas/ theoretical frameworks, but rather an exploration of intellectually provocative and, at times, conceptually difficult texts from which the class may draw conceptual and ethical sustenance.


HSJ2999 H

This course will first review the literature on informal learning related to work and labour, with an emphasis on activity theory as a mode of analysis. It will then probe the potential and limits of learning within union cultures in Canada, and a range of traditions among community organizations in acting for workers' interests. Finally, it will probe specific cases of learning by union and community organizations to cooperate, to act in coalition, and to engage in social negotiation that expands worker entitlements and protects the social wage. Course methods will be highly participatory, and activist educators from community and union settings will be


HSJ2999 H

The threshold question for this course is-- How do traditions, contemporary realities, and personal commitments combine to create Aboriginal and Indigenous leaders? Using leadership profiles and case materials from North and South America, Australia, New Zealand, and Africa, we will critically examine how leadership is conceptualized and carried out by Aboriginal and Indigenous leaders. The intent of this course is not to develop leaders, but rather to explore Aboriginal and Indigenous leadership praxis, trends, issues, perspectives, and models of traditional leadership and governance. Our focus will be on the leadership styles and issues associated with assimilation, resistance, resurgence, nation building, and globalization. From Paulo Freire, we know that the "praxis" is what defines leadership. We also know that communication between and among leaders and followers is what gives rise to a people's vision, future direction, and action. Most likely, we have also observed that the backdrop for this interplay arises from the politics leading up to, and creating the moment that Aboriginal leaders in a variety of settings emerge out into the public eye. Theories of leadership, organizational behaviour discourse, and sociopolitical research, while seldom related to Aboriginal and Indigenous populations, will be utlized and expanded as tools for gaining insight into the cultural dynamics of leadership.


HSJ2999 H

This course will focus on empirical and interpretive methodologies for historical and historically-oriented cultural studies research. Students will explore an array of intellectual approaches to history, with a particular emphasis on the contributions and interventions of 'post' inflected frameworks from poststructuralist and postcolonial studies. They will examine a variety of primary source materials, such as archival documents, oral history interviews, and visual images, and analyze them as texts situated within particular temporal and spatial contexts. The course will provide students with intellectual tools necessary to conduct research in their own areas of interest, to substantiate their arguments with empirical data and analysis, and to critically locate their work in relation to other historical and cultural studies scholarship.


HSJ2999 H

This course is an introduction to systematic thinking around how people learn to address personal and social conflict in work settings. It will probe the structural sources of increasing stress and conflict in workplaces and consider a range of informal learning practices that people adopt in response. It will provide exposure to various approaches to addressing and resolving conflicts. The course will assess the potential and limits of collective action by unions and associations. Using (class, gender, race, disability, age) equity lenses, we will explore the experience and stances of course participants, and engage in role plays of situations in order to develop skills and insight for intervening. No prerequisites. Links will be made with relevant research in the Learning and Work focus.


HSJ2999 H

One of the central aims in this course will be to illustrate how education policy as developed among contemporary industrialized nations reproduces, in anti-democratic and anti-educational fashion, difficult neo- liberal economic, social and labour market conditions. This social reproduction, with its deleterious impact on working people, is achieved through a variety of ideological processes present in current educational policy and programs. These processes will be identified and discussed in the context of this course. We will also explore the actual impact of neo-liberal policies on people from a range of employment sectors, and consider how the notion of a "knowledge economy" misrepresents the actual occupational experience of many Canadian workers. However, pointing out these serious labour market problems will not transform them and, hence, our ultimate objective in this course is to provide teachers, workers and students concerned about democratic citizenship with concrete strategies to challenge the neo-liberal assumptions dominating the contemporary education and labour market environments.


HSJ2999 H

The intent of this course is to develop and understand the philosophical basis of Indigenous health and healing practices & the implications for education by reviewing educational and research initiatives in this area. The course will broaden students' understanding of holistic methods of health and healing practices in the context of education and schooling. Given the impacts of globalization, different communities are faced with a myriad of physical, economic, psychological, mental and community distress. A course on the sociology of Indigenous health and healing practices and the implication for education will create a space for dialogue and critical evaluation of the importance of good health (physical, mental and emotional) for learning, researching and teaching. The resurgence of alternative health and healing practices is crucial at this time when different communities, both from mainstream and Indigenous communities, are searching for holistic methods of health and healing. Indigenous healing practices are unique: all physical, mental and spiritual phenomena are studied, understood, and practiced and taught to the whole community. Some of the questions that will be addressed through discussion, readings and guest speakers are: What is healing? What are the different modes of healing outside contemporary healing practices and what are their implications to knowledge production and dissemination? Why do we deal with inbuilt tensions between and among different modes of healing and their implication to education? Healing is more than just keeping and restoring one’s health. It is also about the relationship with other human beings and other creatures (animate/inanimate, visible/invisible), and the universe. What has this got to do with sociology of education? Ancient Indigenous practitioners taught the patients about herbs, healing and basic ceremonial practices and its implication to survival of a community. Using localized modes of knowledge dissemination, almost all families acquired basic knowledge of health and healing. However, due to colonization and the growing impetus of migration to urban centers, some of the practices were disrupted.


HSJ2999 H

Stories are told, poetry is written, engagement in activism unfolds, and critical reflection is expressed in Aboriginal women's texts. As Aboriginal women we speak out against injustices and for the lives and roles of women in community, focus upon healing communities, lives, and mother earth. The focus of the course is to hear Aboriginal women as they work to transform a consciousness theorizing from Aboriginal perspectives and reformulating feminisms from Indigenous perspectives.


HSJ2999 H

This course will examine the ways in which Queer Theory as a pedagogical project reorients. Taking as its starting point that queer theory demands an orientation that is more than sexuality, the course investigates how queer theory and its pedagogical implications produces new modes of thought and new modes of engagement. This course ask such questions as what constitutes queer method; is there a uniquely queer thought; does queer pedagogy require queer bodies; and what are the stakes of a queer educational practice? In this course students will examine the history of Queer Theory and its major inventions. Importantly, students will engage with scholarship that is interdisciplinary and therefore offers a method of queer practice with its numerous implications for educational practices and pedagogies. Finally, this course is concerned with the social and it asks what kinds of different social relations might be possible when queer ideas orients


HSJ2999 H

Canada's national mythology, a well-known set of constructs including those associated with 'the nicest place to live on earth'; peacekeeping; a kinder, gentler place than the US; a land of immigrants, infuse and shape the currciulum in specific ways. In this course, I propose to explore national and international mythologies about Canada, examining how they reproduce racial hierarchies. We will then explore how these mythologies have shaped the curriculum and the role of schools and universities in producing national subjects. Specifically, we will examine curriculum where the national is expressly taught (history, geography, family studies, and so on). We will also consider informal practices, the hidden curriculum, as well as formal schooling practices, to see how Canadian children and young adults learn about their identities as Canadians. Throughout the course, the central focus will be on race and national mythology or how the white Anglo- Saxon citizen is reproduced as normative in schooling,


HSJ2999 H

This course enables students to examine issues of equity in education. It looks at the relationship between current global dynamics and processes, education and learning within formal institutions of education and in broader non formal or informal settings where learning takes place. The first objective will be to develop a critical understanding of social inequalities through race, class, gender, sexuality, language, ability and other interlocking systems of oppression, and on how such systems unfold in the education domain. The second objective is to better understand and critically challenge the politics of meaning in education and explore how education may also be structured as a resource within an equity framework. Students will be encouraged to draw on their experiences as teachers, learners, parents, school administrators, and/or community activists.


HSJ2999 H

This course will provide a comprehensive analysis of poverty in Canada with a special focus on Toronto neighbourhoods and the marginalization of racialized groups, using data sources ranging from large-scale surveys to personal narratives. Research literatures on links of economic conditions and education, anti- poverty policy, community organizing and popular adult education will be reviewed critically to identify most effective community-based anti-poverty organizing and popular education programs. Potential roles of teachers and other community agents in poverty reduction will be examined. No prerequisites.


HSJ2999 H

This course builds on SES1904 (Sociological Theory in Education) and analyses sociological theory as it is practised today. While building on the work of sociological classics, the course will focus on bodies of literature that influence contemporary sociological inquiry and debate. Thus the course will attend to, for example, neo-Marxian and systems analysis, symbolic interactionism, post-modern and post-colonial theories. On a practical level, this course will enable students to conceptualize and make use of sociological theory in their own research in education. .


HSJ2999 H

The goal of this course is to examine the learning dynamics endemic to social movement building and action. It will emphasize learning as a composite of individual and collective human change in terms of the forms of the socio-cultural and material infrastructure and participatory structures of social movements as well as traditional changes in consciousness, skill and knowledge amongst participants. We will draw on both advanced theories of sociology of education/learning understood in the context of the long-established sociological sub-tradition known as 'social movement theory'. Social movements will be understood broadly including but not limited to the women's movement, the labour movement, various anti-colonial and anti-racism movements, anti-poverty movements, disability rights movements, and others, in addition to forms of nationalist political organizing during periods of social change. A significant proportion of the course will involve detailed secondary research and analysis of a specific social movement of the student's choosing, and will demand regular research reports leading to final papers in the second half of the course. The course is highly recommended to advanced masters as well as doctoral students. No prerequisites.


HSJ2999 H

Ce cours porte sur les francophonies minoritaires canadiennes. Il met en valeur le rôle central que joue l'école dans la revendication minoritaire et, plus globalement, dans le cheminement identitaire que connaissent les francophonies. On y retrace d'abord les grands conflits ayant marqué la scène scolaires en Acadie, en Ontario et dans l'Ouest canadien: luttes cléricales, droits scolaires, parachèvement, gestion scolaire. L'école se voit ensuite etudiée en rapport aux autres institutions qui participent au façonnement des francophonies minoritaires et lui en assurent la vitalité. Un regard sur les processus de socialisation à l'oeuvre au sein de l'institution même et surtout sur l'articulation des divers processus de socialisation qui interviennent dans les milieux minoritaires francophones complète d'analyse (ex.: socialisation familiale, appartenance


HSJ2999 H

This course will examine the multiple and contradictory racial and social identities ascribed to and embraced/resisted by Jews in contemporary Western societies. Students will be introduced to an emerging body of literature which utilizes cultural studies, feminist, postcolonial, postmodern, queer and anti-racism theoretical frameworks to explore both Jewish subjectivity and the intersection of Jewish concerns with those of other marginalized groups. New forms of Jewish cultural, political and spiritual resistance to cultural erasure will be surveyed as will ongoing practices of anti-Semitism. The course will be of interest to students seeking to broaden the scope of anti-racist theory and pedagogical practice as well as to those whose area of study includes Jewish education and Jewish communal life.


HSJ2999 H

Sous une perspective multidisciplinaire, ce cours traite du lien entre l'immigration, la race et l'ethnicité au sein de la francophonie internationale de manière générale et la francophonie canadienne de façon particulière. D'abord, nous explorerons les approches classiques et contemporaines de la race et de l'ethnicité. Ensuite, nous souleverons certains enjeux socio-historiques et politiques liés à la francophonie comme organisation mondiale et comme espace géo-politique. Puis, nous nous pencherons sur l'immigration dans l'espace francophone pour nous concentrer par la suite sur l'immigration francophone au Canada. Parmi les questions soulevées on compte: le statut du français dans divers pays, les agences francophones, les relations Nord- Sud, les facteurs qui engendrent l'immigration, l'insertion socio-économique, le racisme, les divers groupes ethniques, les relations raciales et ethniques et les femmes. Ainsi, nous comptons examiner diverses tensions, proposer des solutions et identifier l'implication de l'immigration pour l'avenir du Canada et des pays sources.


HSJ2999 H

This course explores histories of racism, displacement and legal disenfranchisement that create citizenship injustices for Indigenous peoples in Canada. It aims to highlight a set of decolonizing perspectives on belonging and identity, to contest existing case law and policy, and to deconstruct the normative discourses of law, liberalism and cultural representation that inform and shape the relationship between Ongwehoweh (real people) and colonial-settler governments. The course is centered on exploring the challenges and contradictions raised by resurgence strategies and reparation involving citizenship from an anti-racist, anti- colonial and indigenous-centered perspective.


HSJ2999 H

Sous une perspective multidisciplinaire, ce séminaire examinera les liens entre la langue, la diversité et les francophonies canadiennes et internationales comprises comme des « marchés » et non seulement des « communautés ». À partir d’une approche sociolinguistique critique et ethnographique, ainsi que l’analyse critique du discours, nous explorerons comment la langue sert d’instrument de pouvoir et de capital symbolique/matériel qui définit certains locuteurs et certaines espaces comme « légitimes » et d’autres pas. Avec une théorisation critique de la race, du néo-colonialisme et de la diversité, nous déconstruirons certains processus socio-historiques et politico-économiques liés aux espaces francophones (e.g. l’école, le tourisme, l’église ou les agences gouvernementales, entre autres). Comment ces espaces, souvent ancrés dans un lieu et dans une langue, sont-elles en train d’être redéfinies compte tenu d’une francophonie plurielle ? Avec quelles conséquences pour qui ? Parmi les sujets à étudier, on compte : les rapports de pouvoir, les différences sociales, la mondialisation, l’immigration et la mobilité, le (post)nationalisme et les politiques identitaires et linguistiques.


HSJ2999 H

As an institution of public culture, the museum is a site of civic pedagogy where knowledge and perceptions of the social sphere can be presented, disseminated, challenged and debated. On such terms, museums function as forums for explorations of the substance and meaning of civic culture, helping to clarify and re- articulate existing and future relationships among diverse people and their environments. This course will explore contemporary examples of such practice, locating their significance within recent developments in museology, education, social aesthetics, public history, and public sociology. Examples will be drawn from North America, Africa, Latin America, Europe and South Asia.


HSJ2999 H

This course examines the intersections of Aboriginal and Indigenous perspectives and knowledges focusing on the voices of Aboriginal and Indigenous peoples. Through de-colonizing, we examine two sources of colonizing -- that from outside that is directed at Aboriginal and Indigenous peoples and that which is from within. The focus of the course is on decolonizing the mind by understanding the politics of colonization, de- universalizing language and language politics, examining politics and traditions and the practice of speaking out, exploring Indigenous approaches to healing, and challenging colonized culture and suppression agencies. Aboriginal and Indigenous peoples from around the world from around the world inform the examining of the everyday practices of resistance. Indigenous peoples globally experience colonization, its organization, maintenance structures and practices, as well as its mindset or way of seeing the world which enable the continuation of oppression. Resistance to oppression is conceptualized and reconceptualized in changing contexts by Indigenous peoples. Resources for decolonizing the mind include revitalization of traditional worldviews, honoring Indigenous knowledges, sustaining Indigenous languages, and challenging and reconceptualizing research practices.


HSJ2999 H

This course will explore the problems and possibilities inherent in pedagogies of historical memory that are attempting to alter the civic structure of societies that have divisive histories of violent conflict and systemic injustice. The course will be framed through a consideration of theoretical discussion of the relation of social memory and various notions of reconciliation. However, more concretely, the central course readings will draw on writing, visual art, and museum exhibitions that address and critique the practices and consequences of various truth commissions and national enquiries in countries including Canada, South Africa, Australia, Peru, and Northern Ireland.


HSJ2999 H

This course focuses on P. Bourdieu’s theory of habitus as he conceptualized and reworked the notion in his writings over a 40 year period. It also examines how habitus has been critiqued and expanded by other French sociological thinkers in the area of education and learning. Bourdieu’s legacy to social theory is twofold: first in the constant reshaping of his core key concepts, constitutive of a theory of practice, which include the notions of habitus, capital and field, and second, on the use of such concepts as analytical tools in various areas of social life. Bourdieu held that domination is rooted in the everyday life common sense, in the preconceived, in ‘what goes without saying’, and that social inquiry consisted in ‘denaturalizing’ the social world. His overall critique of domination and insistence on testing his ideas in detailed fieldwork were driven by the idea of transforming research into a liberating intellectual tool. This course analyses three moments in the development of the concept of habitus in relation to education: 1) as a critique of domination, discussed in Bourdieu’s early work on schools, on habitus also understood as a disposition of action, illustrated in Le sens pratique (1980), and as structured and structuring dispositions of action, here, in the field of higher education in Homo Academicus (1984) ; 2) as a critique of Bourdieu’s critique of domination challenged, first, by R. Boudon’s view on social mobility (1973) and more broadly by the French sociology of schooling (van Haecht, 1990) as well as French scholars in education interested in the idea of knowledge as a relational mode of thinking (Charlot, 1997); and 3) as a theory of action in today’s context of a multiplicity of social world in which social actors are engaged, namely in B. Lahire’s studies on the plural actor as well as on families’ reading practices.


HSJ2999 H

This course explores the ways in which contemporary theory inscribes the body and how the lived actuality of embodiment might disturb these inscriptions. We begin by considering various theoretical writings, ranging from Marxism, anti-racism, post-colonial, feminist and queer theory. This is not, however, a survey course. Instead, the course explores how to engage contemporary theoretical work as it addresses and elides the issue of embodiment. At the point where social theory intersects the body, the course begins to do the critical theoretical work of questioning what limits and possibilities are made of, and inscribed on, the body. Particular attention is given to how theory addresses embodied differences, such as disability, impairment, illness, or the vulnerable body. The course ends by raising the issue as to how vulnerable and ambiguous embodiment teaches something about the limits and possibilities of contemporary social theories by asking: How do, and how might, we embody theory?


HSJ2999 H

This course will examine some current approaches to language as social practice which are centrally oriented to contributions to social theory. In particular, the course will look at the long-standing problem of the relationship between agency and structure, especially with reference to social difference, social inequality and social change. Currently emerging approaches will also be examined in light of political economic shifts (globalization/globalism; neoliberalism and neoconservatism; the new economy) and their impact on theory and method in the social sciences, especially regarding the role of language in the construction of social life. The course will provide a site for exploring elements of research design applied to areas of student concern, and more generally for working through concrete problems of theory and practice, in particular regarding current issues in the sociology and anthropology of education.


HSJ3417 H

This course will explore progressive, critical, feminist, and other radical pedagogies in their theoretical and historical contexts. The seminar will examine diverse contemporary debates regarding pedagogical questions surrounding such notions as "voice", "empowerment", and "dialogue" that have been advocated and contested within critical educational theory.


HSJ3452 H

Description as for TPS 1452H.


HSJ3453 H

Description as for TPS 1453H.


HSJ3480 H

This is a required research seminar for Ed.D. candidates involving consideration of the problems of philosophical studies in a critical context. The seminar will include presentation and criticism of students' thesis/project proposals and progress reports.


HSJ3481 H

See description for course TPS3480H.


HSJ3490 H

This is a required research seminar for Ed.D. candidates involving consideration of the problems of historical studies in a critical context. The seminar will include presentation and criticism of students' thesis/project proposals and progress reports.


HSJ3491 H

See description for course TPS 3490H.


HSJ3904 H

This course will explore some of the 'classical' questions and arguments in sociological theory, and some of the authors who provided definitions and disagreements that have shaped sociology as a discipline. The course concentrates upon and questions the foundations of sociology and its early institutionalization in Europe and the United States between 1850-1935. We will read and discuss how classical sociology in different ways attempted to illuminate, understand and (for some) contribute to changing key features of social relations of emergent modernity. Finally, we will read reflexively to trace the various strategies that sociologists have used to know and represent the social and to claim scientific authority for sociological representations. What is it, if anything, that marks sociological knowledge as different from (and superior to?) everyday or common sense knowledge of the social? In addition to reading works by and about 'founding fathers' Marx, Weber and Durkheim, the course will also reflect on the contributions of Simmel, DuBois and Freud to sociology.


HSJ3905 H

This course will provide students with an introduction to diverse disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to conducting educational research in the humanities and social sciences. The course will simultaneously examine 1) methodological issues in disciplinary and interdisciplinary research, 2) content that is of common interest to multiple disciplines and reflects the scholarship of the HSSSJE faculty, and 3) the relationship between research and praxis in various disciplines. The individual disciplines reflected in the course will include sociology, philosophy, history, anthropology, geography, and political science. Some of the topics to be examined may include the sociology of knowledge, the politics of truth claims, the impact of technology and media, and debates regarding knowledge production and authority. We will approach these questions through different lenses and frameworks that transcend individual disciplines, such as critical race, postcolonial, feminist, and postmodern theories. While engaging with the methods and assumptions of various fields of research, the overriding inquiry in this course will be epistemological, derived from the philosophical study of how knowledge is acquired, verified, produced, and transmitted.


HSJ3910 H

This advanced graduate seminar will examine multiple scholarly approaches to researching race, ethnicity, difference and anti-racism issues in schools and other institutional settings. It begins with a brief examination of race and anti-racism theorizing and the exploration of the history, contexts and politics of domination studies in sociological and educational research. The course then looks at ontological, epistemological, and ethical questions, and critical methodological reflections on race, difference and social research. The course will focus on the ethnographic, survey and historical approaches, highlighting specific qualitative and quantitative concerns that implicate studying across the axes of difference. We will address the issues of school and classroom participant observation,; the pursuit of critical ethnography as personal experience, stories and narratives; the study of race, racism and anti-racism projects through discourse analysis; and the conduct of urban ethnography. Through the use of case studies, we will review race and anti-racism research in cross-cultural comparative settings and pinpoint some of the methodological innovations in social research on race and difference. Prerequisite: SES1922H or permission of instructor.


HSJ3911 H

With the advent of colonialism, non-European traditional societies were disrupted. A starting point is an appreciation of the vast array of cultural diversity in the world. The course interrogates how various media have taken up these knowledge systems, presented to the world in the form of texts, films, and educational practices, and examines how colonial education sustains the process of cultural knowledges fragmentation. Our analysis will serve to deepen insights and to develop intellectual skills to cultivate a greater understanding of the dynamics generated through representations and the role of colonial education in sustaining and delineating particular cultural knowledge. We will also explore the various forms of resistance encountered in the process of fragmentaion and examine how certain groups of people in various parts of the world have maintained their cultural base, and how this has been commodified, commercialized and romanticized. The course makes use of forms of cultural expressions such as films and critical theories on race, gender, sexuality, and class. Prerequisite: Masters students need approval of instructor.


HSJ3912 H

As a qualitative research course for masters and doctoral students who already possess some familiarity with postmodern, feminist and critical race theories, the course will consist of readings that explore the following question: how is knowledge production racialized? A related question is: how can we understand the operation of multiple systems of domination in the production of racialized knoweldge? How can intellectuals challenge imperialist and racist systems through their research and writing? This course is built around the idea that responsible research and writing begins with a critical examination of how relations of power shape knowledge production. What explanatory frameworks do we as scholars rely on when we understake research? How do we go about critically examining our own explanations and others when the issue is race? To examine these themes in depth, historically as well as in the present, the course will focus on colonialism, imperialism, racism and knowledge production. Specifically, the course explores three defining imperial constructs: indianism, orientalism and africanism. We consider how the legacy of imperial ideas shaped racial knowledge and the disciplines, positioning us as scholars as active participants in the imperial enterprise. In part two of the course, we explore interlocking systems of oppression: how imperial knowledge simultaneously upholds and is upheld by capitalism and patriarchy. For the third part of the course, we examine how we understand the immigrant's body, the citizen, the migrant and what it means to produce knowledge as a post-colonial scholar.


HSJ3914 H

Contact between the 'imperial order' and the 'colonial' periphery continues to involve complex and creative encounters/resistances. The myriad forms of resistance help sustain the local human condition of the colonized 'other'. This advanced seminar will examine the anti-colonial framework as an approach to theorizing issues emerging from colonial and colonized relations, using subversive pedagogy and instruction as important entry points to critical social practice. Focusing on the writings and commentaries of revolutionary/radical thinkers like Memmi, Fanon, Cabral, Gandhi, Machel, Che Guevara, Nyerere and Nkrumah, the course will interrogate the theoretical distinctions between anti- and post-colonial thought, and identify the particular implications/lessons for critical educational practice. Among the questions explored will be: the challenge of articulating anti-colonial thought as an epistemology of the colonized, anchored in the indigenous sense of collective and common colonial consciousness. Throughout the course, there is a particular gaze on how reading early anti-colonial theorists helps the contemporary learner in extending the explorations of the 'colonial encounter', and the 'colonizing experience' into a cohesive theoretical and practical contribution to social thought and political action. Throughout the course, there is a particular gaze on how reading early anti-colonial theorists helps the contemporary learner in extending the explorations of the ‘colonial encounter’, and the ‘colonizing experience’ into a cohesive theoretical and practical contribution to social thought and political action.


HSJ3915 H

What accounts for the "Fanon Renaissance"? Why and how is Fanon important to schooling and education today? This upper level graduate seminar will examine the intellectual contributions of Franz Fanon as a leading anti-colonial theorist to the search for genuine educational options and transformative change in contemporary society. The complexity, richness and implications of his ideas for critical learners pursuing a subversive pedagogy for social change are discussed. The course begins with a critical look at Fanon as a philosopher, pedagogue and anti-colonial practitioner. We draw on his myriad intellectual contributions to understanding colonialism and imperial power relations, social movements and the politics of social liberation. Our interest in Fanon will also engage how his ideas about colonialism and its impact on the human psyche help us to understand the process of liberation within the context of contestations over questions of identity and difference, and our pursuit of race, gender, class and sexual politics today. Class discussions will broach such issues as the contexts in which Fanon developed his ideas and thoughts and how these developments subsequently came to shape anti-colonial theory and practice, the limits and possibilities of political ideologies, as well as the theorization of imperialism and spiritual 'dis-embodiment', particularly in Southern contexts. Specific subject matters include Fanon's understanding of violence, nationalism and politics of identity, national liberation and resistance, the 'dialectic of experience', the psychiatry of racism and the psychology of oppression, the limits of revolutionary class politics, and the power of 'dramaturgical vocabulary', and how his ideas continue to make him a major scholarly figure. The course will also situate Fanon in such intellectual currents as Marxism and Neo-marxism, existentialism and psychoanalysis, Negritude, African philosophy and anti-colonialism, drawing out the specific implications for education and schooling.


HSJ3929 H

This course proceeds from scholarly work that conceives of embodiment as a socio-political phenomenon. The purpose of this course is to open to critical inquiry cultural representations of physical, sensory, mental, etc, variations. Through an interrogation of disability as it is experienced, known, or managed we will develop transgressive methods of reading and writing that explore the complex social significance of embodied diversity. The aim is to challenge taken-for-granted and dominant representations of the meaning of transgressive bodies in various social arenas, such as medicine and education. The course relies on and teaches critical interpretive methods of social inquiry. Potential topics include uncovering how transgressive bodies are typically known and how different interpretive relations can transgress what is said and done to such bodies. We will treat disability as a complex and conflicting scene of representation where knowledge production, power relations, and identity formation can be examined and transformed.


HSJ3933 H

This course seeks to critically interrogate notions of the transnational found in recent feminist theorizing. 'Transnational' has been invested with a variety of meanings and political attributes, from descriptions of global capital to the politics of alliance and coalition-building, from the creation of subjectivities through to the reconfiguration of imperialist ideologies and practices in the contemporary conjuncture. It is about linkages and unequal connections. By engaging a broad and necessarily interdisciplinary spectrum of work, this course seeks to trace the variety of methods and investments that feminists have brought to bear on their engagement with transnationality. What are some of the implications for theory, for activism, for imaginative and pedagogical practices?


HSJ3996 H

Special Topics in Advanced Humanities, Social Sciences and Social Justice Research in Education:


HSJ3997 H

Practicum or field-based experience in an area of social justice education is vital in the development of skills in the application of knowledge from theory and research findings to practical educational social justice problems. With approval from the EdD student’s supervisor and a suitable field placement, signalled by a completed Social Justice Education EdD Practicum Agreement Form (HSJ3997H), the student is required to: (a) spend 72 hours in active educational fieldwork, paid or volunteer; (b) have regular contact with the practicum supervisor; and (c) produce a reflective essay based on their practicum experiences which includes substantive discussion of relevant social justice education or related academic literature. Examples of relevant educational placements include, but are not limited to, school boards, community organizations, social service organizations, unions, cultural organizations, and other organizations with relevant educational


HSJ3998 H

Description as for SES2998H.


HSJ3999 H

Description as for SES2999H, but at the doctoral level.


HSJ3999 H

This research and writing course engages disability as a socio-political phenomenon. Through an interpretive/cultural disability studies perspective, this course will address students' writing with the aim of developing it within this advanced interpretive conception and practice of disability.


HSJ3999 H

A research seminar which will aid students to pursue thesis-related topics in this field. Topics will include: a critical overview of theories of learning in diverse cultural and historical contexts; general studies of the changing nature of paid and unpaid work in contemporary societies; the roles of educators in facilitating transitions between learning and work; class, gender, race, age and ability-based differences in learning and work relations; and relations between workplace redesign and educational reform initiatives.


HSJ3999 H

This course draws its inspiration from scholarly work in Disability Studies that conceives of embodiment as a socio-political phenomenon. The purpose of this course is to open cultural representations of physical, sensory, mental, and emotional variations to critical inquiry. The aim is to challenge dominant representations of the meaning of transgressive bodies produced by professional expertise in various social arenas, such as medicine and education. Through an interrogation of disability as it is experienced, represented, and governed, we will develop transgressive methods of reading, writing and research that explore the complex social significance of embodiment. The course relies on interpretive methods of social inquiry developed in disability, feminist/sexuality, and race studies. Potential topics include mainstream power and knowledge relations with transgressive bodies as well as how different interpretive relations can transgress what is already known and done to such bodies. We will treat disability as a complex and conflicting scene of represenation where knowledge production, power relations, and identity formation can be examined and transformed.


HSJ3999 H

Work, broadly conceived, is an important site of reproduction of social inequities inclusive of the relations of race, gender, dis/ability and social class. Sociological methods for analyzing learning and work include qualitative and quantitative approaches focusing on the micro, meso as well as macro level. They involve practical, technical, methodological and epistemological decisions relevant to understanding both learning (informal, nonformal and formal) and work (paid and unpaid). This course will be based around student projects and will lead to advanced knowledge and skill in each of the above areas.


HSJ3999 H

This course will deal with factors of capitalist development of the Canadian economy, uneven regional development, the nature of the Canadian state, Canada's place in the modern world economy, and Canadian class formations, in terms of their shaping of our educational systems. The educational implications of such topics as the economic roles of Canadian women, the cultural impact of the U.S.A., and Quebec nationalism may also be considered. Students will be expected to conduct a case study dealing with the limits of educational reform in Canada.


HSJ3999 H

What accounts for the "Fanon Renaissance"? Why and how is Fanon important to schooling and education today? This upper level graduate seminar will examine the intellectual contributions of Franz Fanon as a leading anti-colonial theorist to the search for genuine educational options and transformative change in contemporary society. The complexity, richness and implications of his ideas for critical learners pursuing a subversive pedagogy for social change are discussed. The course begins with a critical look at Fanon as a philosopher, pedagogue and anti-colonial practitioner. We draw on his myriad intellectual contributions to understanding colonialism and imperial power relations, social movements and the politics of social liberation. Our interest in Fanon will also engage how his ideas about colonialism and its impact on the human psyche help us to understand the process of freedom within the context of contestations over questions of identity and difference, and our pursuit of race, gender, class and sexual politics today. Class discussions will broach such issues as the contexts in which Fanon developed his ideas and thoughts and how these developments subsequently came to shape anti-colonial thoery and practice, the limits and possibilities of political ideologies, as well as the theorization of imperialism and spiritual 'dis-embodiment', particularly in Southern contexts. Specific subject matters include Fanon's understanding of violence, nationalism and politics of identity, national liberation and resistance, the 'dialectic of experience', the psychiatry of racism and the psychology of oppression, the limits of revolutionary class politics, and the power of 'dramaturgical vocabulary', and how his ideas continue to make him a major scholarly figure. The course will also situate Fanon in such intellectual currents as Marxism and Neo-marxism, existentialism and psychoanalysis, Negritude, African philosophy and anti-colonialism, drawing out the specific implications for education and schooling. Throughout the course, there is a particular gaze on how reading Fanon helps the contemporary learner in extending the explorations of the 'colonial encounter', and the 'colonizing experience' into a cohesive theoretical and practical contribution to social thought and political action.


HSJ3999 H

Practical experience in an area of sociology and equity studies in education fieldwork is a vital element of the development of skills in the application of knowledge from theory and research, i.e., it involves "the developmnet of skills in the application of knowledge from theory and research findings to practical educational problems" (from the Graduate Bulletin). In consultation with the SESE departmental Practicum Liaison person (see SESE Student Handbook), the student shall establish a practicum supervisor, and a suitable placement in consultation with her/his practicum supervisor signaled by completion of an 'Internship Agreement Form' (see SESE Student Handbook). For successful completion of this half year course, students are required to: a) spend 72 hours in active educational fieldwork; b) have regular contact with their individual practicum supervisor; c) complete an 'Internship Action Plan' (see SESE Student Handbook); and d) produce a reflective paper based on their experiences which includes substantive discussion of relevant sociological literature. Examples of relevant educational placements include but are not limited to school boards and other institutions of civil society with significant education functions.


HSJ3999 H

The idea of the public is founded on the necessity of communicative acts that secure learning and deliberation as essential aspects of the social. The course explores differing contemporary theories addressed to formulating the communicative acts necessary for a democratic public life. In addition, it will consider the ways in which the idea of a democratic public has become intertwined with media and technology.


HSJ3999 H

This course will provide an extension of SES3943H Applied Sociology of State Formation and Educational Policy. While that course focused on relations and forms of state, governance and regulation, this course will deal with questions of representation and resistance. We will consider several forms of representation: artistic practices (particularly photography and video that aim to disrupt dominant images and identities); modes of political representation (especially ones where marginalized groups make representations on public institutions and governments); and forms of self-representation (collective and individual). In all of these areas of inquiry, we will focus on texts, photographs, videos and other practices that seek to disrupt, subvert and transform dominant or normative forms of representation.


HSJ3999 H

This course draws its inspiration from burgeoning scholarly work in the New Disability Studies in the Humanities. Its purpose is to open physical, mental and emotional variation/s to wide-ranging critical enquiry. Thus, we will challenge the ways in which transgressive "bodies" have been dominated by professional expertise, specifically by practices of medicalization. We will redefine dis/ability through the knowledge/s arising from direct experience and the actions of disability (social) movements. Particular attention will be given to discovering, exploring and/or creating "transgressive" methods of research and writing that will facilitate this orientation. The course draws upon a number of theoretical perspectives, including the social constructionist analyses that inform gender and race studies. Potential topics are numerous: from the inequitable distribution of resources, status and power to the related cultural and linguistic practices that


JDS1233 H

This course provides an introduction to a variety of topics in cognitive development that are of contemporary interest. Basic knowledge of cognitive development theory and findings from infancy to adolescence is assumed. We cover those topics that are currently consuming significant research interest among cognitive developmentalists. These topics currently include concepts and conceptual change in infants, core domains in conceptual development, the organization of action in infancy, the onset of symbolic functioning, memory development, the use of the imagination, theory formation as a model for conceptual change, and scientific reasoning.


JDS3000 H

The aim of this course is to introduce students to advanced methods in Developmental Science. Prior to taking this course all students will already have taken at least one graduate course in research design and statistics in which basic design and analytic methods in psychology will have been covered. This course will further students' methodological training by introducing them to the most current methods being utilized in developmental research. The course will cover approximately twelve topics. Each topic will be covered by a faculty member in the Developmental Science program with expertise in that particular area.


JHC1251 H

This course will provide the student with a better understanding of current issues in reading in a second language (L2) by focusing on theoretical and practical questions. Theories and research on reading in a first language (L1) will be examined for their relevance to reading comprehension in L2. A cognitive developmental approach will be used to examine the applicability of research findings on topics such as: background knowledge; text structure; comprehension strategies; study strategies; cultural differences; and reading in various content areas. Students will be encouraged to develop their own research questions and to apply these to practical L2 reading contexts.







JHS1916 H

This course will give students an opportunity to address issues that have both theoretical resonance and practical relevance for them. Beginning with a review of the Canadian postsecondary context and international comparisons, we then consider appropriate methods and theories for studying the graduate student experience. We proceed to a series of topics that relate to graduate programs and degrees, drawing on the research literature. These topics focus on issues that arise as students navigate through programs and into ‘life after graduate school’, including identity, writing, classroom experiences, disciplinary differences, the ‘hidden curriculum’, and thesis supervision. Integrated into the course will be an opportunity to do some qualitative interviewing of other students. Equity issues and comparative perspectives will be found


JHS3932 H

This course enables students to take a close look, from a sociological perspective, at gender relations in higher education. The focus will be on women students and faculty members in universities and colleges, although it is understood that gender operates in tandem with race, class, age, sexual orientation and other sources of identity and positioning. We will consider questions of access, representation, experience, and career; look at efforts to alter curriculum and pedagogy in accordance with ideas about women's needs or feminist process; and review feminist and other critiques of the purposes and cultures of the university. Specific topics such as student cultures, thesis supervision, sexual harassment, the "chilly climate," and so forth will be taken up through readings and student presentations.







JPX1001 H

This course is designed to introduce students to a multidisciplinary range of approaches to the understanding of parenting. Research, theory, and professional practice are surveyed in a number of disciplines. Levels of analysis extend from the psychology of parenting to the societal context. Synthesis of the material is achieved via an organizing framework based on the social ecology of human development and via critical comparisons of different disciplinary perspectives. (Offered jointly by OISE, the Faculty of Social Work and the Department of Psychology)


JSA5147 H

The purpose of this course is to examine the relationship between ideologies and practices of language and nation, from the period of the rise of the nation-State in the 19th century to current social changes related to the globalized new economy which challenge prevailing ideas about language and nation. We will discuss the role of language in the construction of major European nation-States and in their colonial expansion; the role of language in post-colonial nation-building; the construction, positioning and repositioning of so-called linguistic minorities and indigenous rights movements (the concept of immigration is relevant, of course, but falls beyond the scope of what we can cover here); the commodification of language and identity in the current economy; language and globalization; and current debates on the ecology of language and language endangerment. Throughout we will also examine the role of linguists, anthropologists and other producers of discoruse about language, nation and State in the construction of theories of nation, ethnicity, race and citizenship.


JTE1952 H

Le lien entre l'usage linguistique, les rapports sociaux, la culture et l'éducation, à l'intérieur comme à l'extérieur des écoles, sera examiné selon l'approche anthropologique de l'ethnographie de la communication. La première partie du cours sera consacrée à l'étude des caractéristiques et des origines des différences culturelles dans la façon de s'exprimer à l'oral et à l'écrit, et de même que le comportement adopté dans l'interaction sociale. La deuxième partie sera consacrée à l'étude des conséquences de ces différences culturelles en ce qui a trait au rendement académique et au développement linguistique des élèves en situation multilingue/multiculturelle. Finalement, nous examinerons l'utilité de l'approche ethnographique comme méthodologie de recherche et comme outil ou méthode pédagogique. Le cadre théorique et méthodologique établi dans ce cours servira à l'examen des problèmes de l'éducation franco-ontarienne.


JTE1952 H

The anthropological perspective of the ethnography of communication will be adopted to study the relationship between language use, social relations, culture and learning in and out of schools. The course will deal with the nature and origin of cultural differences in language use and patterns and social interactional styles; with the consequences of those differences for school performance; and with the usefulness of the ethnography of communication as both a research and a pedagogical tool in the development of curricula and teaching practices that account for such differences. The ethnography of communication will also be interpreted in the light of political economic perspectives on the issue of sociolinguistic diversity and educational success.







JTE1952 H

Le lien entre l'usage linguistique, les rapports sociaux, la culture et l'éducation, à l'intérieur comme à l'extérieur des écoles, sera examiné selon l'approche anthropologique de l'ethnographie de la communication. La première partie du cours sera consacrée à l'étude des caractéristiques et des origines des différences culturelles dans la façon de s'exprimer à l'oral et à l'écrit, et de même que le comportement adopté dans l'interaction sociale. La deuxième partie sera consacrée au lien entre ces différences culturelles, le rendement académique, le développement linguistique des élèves en situation multilingue/multiculturelle et les notion de pouvoir et d'inégalité. Finalement, nous examinerons l'utilité de l'approche ethnographique comme méthodologie de recherche et comme outil ou méthode pédagogique. Le cadre théorique et méthodologique établi dans ce cours servira à l'examen des problèmes de l'éducation francophone.


JTE2912 H

Although there is a long tradition of efforts to describe the characteristics of teachers as an occupational group, or examine the practice of teaching, it is only in the past few decades that scholars have explored the experiences and cultures of teachers in depth, drawing upon a greater range of theories, methods and ideologies. Some researchers have sought to probe the thinking processes of teachers, particularly the way in which knowledge is expressed in action: others have explored the pivotal role of teachers in school effectiveness and innovation; others have developed models of teachers as workers under threat; still others have anlaysed the extent to which gender structures teachers' lives and careers. This course provides an introduction to such topics, at the same time encouraging students who are or have been teachers to reflect upon their own experience and the context in which it occurs. We look at teachers as individuals using skills and creating identities; as actors and negotiators in classrooms; as colleagues in a workplace; as members of an occuption. Throughout, we shall remain alert to the social policy contexts and constraints within which teachers must operate as strategists and decision-makers.


JTE3803 H

Ethnographic research covers all those methods of inquiry typically used in qualitative research, such as interviews, content analysis, focus groups, discourse analysis, triangulation, questionnaires, observation studies, and case studies. It also covers the broad approaches to research that use these methods: classical ethnography, ethnography of communication, and critical ethnography. Participants will be free to concentrate on methods that interest them and to mix methods according to need.


LHA1003 H

A seminar examining the strategies, techniques, and problems involved in the conduct of research in educational administration. This seminar prepares the student for defining research problems, reviewing relevant literature, writing research proposals, conducting research and writing reports in educational administration. During this course the student will prepare the proposal for their Major Research Paper. NOTE: All master's candidates are strongly recommended to take this course towards the end of their


LHA1004 H

The goals of this course are to provide students with an introduction to the purposes of research in educational administration and to assist students in learning how to obtain, evaluate, interpret, and use research in their work as educators and in their graduate studies. Possible topics include: overview of different research paradigms and research strategies used in studies of policy, leadership, and change; how to critically analyze the strengths and weakness of research; how to conduct a review of literature and build a bibliography; dissemination of research; the connections between research, policy, and practice; the role of research and evaluation departments; leadership roles in sponsoring, directing, using, and communicating research.


LHA1005 H

No computer experience required. Introduction to computers in education from an administrative perspective. Topics include issues related to policy, planning and implementation of information technology in educational settings; impact of computer technology on educational organizations and culture; and implications for staff development and curriculum delivery. Current applications of computers at the school, board and Ministry as well as post-secondary levels are presented.


LHA1012 H

An analysis of the organizational culture of educational organizations. The implications for action resulting from research and theory relating to organizational culture are examined. Case studies and field experiences are used as bases for the analysis of decision-making within the context of specific organizational cultures.


LHA1016 H

An analysis of issues and problems in conceptualizing, operationalizing, and evaluating a total school environment in terms of a range of divergent goals and values. Major topics include strategies for program development and change in the context of education in Ontario, Canada, and internationally; theoretical and empirical bases differentiating educational environments, the role of the program manager, and skills needed to manage program development, organization, implementation, and evaluation.


LHA1018 H

Practical considerations in solving political problems in and about schools. Focus is on the five levels of local governance: family/school, micro-politics (within the school), neighbourhood, meso-politics (the school and the central office), and the board. Special attention to understanding background variables such as the environment, institutions, power, and issues. Workshop activities centre around processes such as coalition- building, advocating, believing, and co-producing. Readings include procedural, fictional, and conceptual


LHA1019 H

Administrators in education and teachers are continually asked to decide on matters of equity, to adjudicate between conflicting value positions, and to accommodate different rights and human interests in their planning. Often administrative practice in these areas is less than successful. This course will study various ethical schools of thought and modern approaches to social justice. It will apply that content to administrative practice in education. Particular attention will be given to equity issues in areas of race, culture, gender, age, social class, national origin, language, ancestry, sexual orientation, citizenship, and physical or mental abilities.


LHA1020 H

This course deals with how teachers contribute to and are affected by administrative processes. It looks at the determinants of teachers' classroom strategies, the work culture of teachers, teachers' careers, the role of teachers in school decision-making, the relationship of teachers' educational commitments to aspects of their broader lives (such as age, religious and political beliefs, and gender identity), and the role of teachers in fostering or inhibiting educational change. The course will be of interest to elementary and secondary teachers and to educational administrators.


LHA1024 H

A philosophical inquiry of issues that arise in educational administration and policy studies. Examples of issues include: Differing conceptions of administration and leadership; power and authority in education; the role of critical thinking; standards and diversity; bias in schools; censorship and controversial issues; the role of schooling in a pluralistic society; indoctrination and parental rights; common and separate schools. Case studies will be used to encourage students apply differing philosophical stances to practical situations. .


LHA1025 H

This course examines the factors contributing to school effectiveness, including school climate and physical characteristics, instructional patterns, types of organization, and the use of time. It also considers the possibilities for school improvement in the context of a pluralist democracy and the use of total quality management (TQM) to improve educational institutions.


LHA1026 H

Issues surrounding performance evaluation of teachers and administrators in school systems will be examined. Topics include current practices in evaluation, evaluation policies and procedures, the legal context, the political dimensions, and related areas such as recruitment and selection of personnel. The conceptual background centres around a systems approach to personnel development. The thrust of the discussions, however, will be on practical problems in evaluation in schools within the Canadian setting.


LHA1027 H

La globalisation de l'économie, les nouvelles technologies, le scepticisme du public à l'égard de l'éducation et les réformes éductionnelles ratées des dernières décennies servent de base pour une analyse critique des nouvelles réformes émergentes, tels que, les écoles entrepreneuriales, les écoles à chartes, le système de bons scolaires, la privatisation, le partenariat école-entreprise, les conseils d'écoles et la qualité totale. Ce cours fait aussi l'analyse de l'impact de telles réformes sur la société, l'école et le curriculum.


LHA1027 H

The global economy and its new technologies, public skepticism towards education and the failed systemic educational reforms of the past decades will serve as a background for a critical review of emerging new reform initiatives such as, entrepreneurial schools, charter schools, voucher schools, privatization, business- education partnership, school councils, and Total Quality Management. This course will also analyse the impact of such initiatives on society, school and curriculum.


LHA1029 H

The course will analyze the possible educational opportunities, in particular Leadership and Conflict Resolution, in a time of globalisation, a new economy and living in a multicultural society. The first part will start with the main change in the third Millennium, such as constant increase in the interdependence between national states in different fields (economy, science, culture, politics), disparities between rich and poorer countries, increase in the mobility of human beings, which lets become all societies more and more multiethnic and culticultural. The key part will supply an educational answer to such transformation. Starting with a historic overview of meeting-clashes of people with different linguistic, religious, cultural or ethnic features, the focus will be to provide an epistemological and semantic account of the concepts "transcultural", "multicultural" and intercultural" education. After the review of theoretical elaborations, above all in North American, Canadian and European context and in the educational field, supporting the thesis that education, in an intercultural sense, is currently the most appropriate answer to globalisation and interdependence, the course will provide a general outline of the development of intercultural education (both main contents, methods and objectives, as well as limits) in the field of education, problem solving and leadership. The course will have pratical as well as analytic goals. The underlying premise is that if students are aware of both the main challenges and risk related with globalization and interdependence, as well as the best educational answers, they will have a greater capacity to assume the function as leader, recognize and handle with conflicts in the multicultural society. Using cases such as conflict prevention and complex humanitarian interventions as the context, the course will analyze both the imperatives to introduce new technologies and the sources of bureaucratic and cultural resistance against their introduction.


LHA1029 H

The purpose of this course is to provide students in the interdepartmental urban education M.Ed. Cohort with a foundation in interview and observation research skills they will need for their internship and action research projects.


LHA1029 H

Governments and school systems across the world have been engaged in efforts to create lasting and substantial improvement in a range of student outcomes. In this course students will examine recent change efforts in Ontario and elsewhere so as to develop both a conceptual and practical understanding of strategies for improving system wide outcomes for students, and the strengths and limitations of these strategies


LHA1029 H

The purpose of this course is to critically explore the different conceptions of interculturalism and democracy, as well as the relationship between the two within the context of globalization and neoliberalism. Questions to be examined include: What conceptions of interculturalism are consistent with critical democracy? What are the contradictions and constraints that globalization and neoliberalism create for genuine interculturalism and critical democracy? What is the role of intercultural dialogue? What are some implications and possibilities of interculturalism and critical democracy in educational practice, policy and leadership? The course will have a theoretical as well as a practical aspect. The analytical part will be based both on questions concerning democracy, globalization and neoliberalism and also on the epistemological and semantic clarifications and historical development of the concept of "intercultural education." The practical part will give the students the opportunity to learn and experience models of intercultural competences in the field of leadership including dealing with conflicts in a multicultural society.


LHA1029 H

This is an intermediate applied statistics course designed for students who already understand elementary concepts (e.g., sampling and statistical inference). The course covers the use, interpretation, and presentation of bivariate and multivariate linear regression models, curvilinear regression functions, dummy and categorical variables, and interactions; as well as model selection, assumptions, and diagnostics. Examples and assignments will draw from commonly-used large-scale educational datasets. Students are encouraged to use Stata; the course will also serve as an introduction to this software package.


LHA1029 H

Sociocultural pluralism is a feature of the populations of both the United States and Canada. It is also increasingly recognized as an important feature of many other societies. Canadian students of diversity education are generally quite familiar with the U.S. literature on multicultural education and often refer to it unproblematically in their discussions of Canadian diversity. They are often unaware, though, of the difference in both the policy context and the lived reality of diversity in the two countries. In addition, if they are aware of a larger international context for the discussion of diversity, they are limited by a view that presents diversity or multiculturalism as a Western invention. This course would seed to make students more aware of the social and policy contexts within which multicultural and diversity education have developed in Canada and the United States and to situate this understanding in a global context. A parallel course would be offered at the University at Buffalo (SUNY). Students would have the opportunity through face-to-face and electronic encounters to interact with their counterparts in the U.S.


LHA1029 H

This course explores the different meanings of and pedagogical approaches to student engagement in the context of diverse student needs and student success. Data and cases from two national studies on student engagement and 'students at risk' will be critically explored with the aim of developing visions and strategies relevant to the context of the participants


LHA1029 H

The history and process involved in action research will be explored as a means of assessing personal professional practice and school improvement. Action research is presented as personal research conducted by a practitioner to improve personal practice or as a means for a group of practitioners to assess school improvement efforts in their school. As qualitative research methodology is typically considered most appropriate for action research, where appropriate the underlying methodology and assumptions of qualitative research will be examined. Each student will conduct an action research study using qualitative research methodology.


LHA1029 H

This course will introduce students to critical-Democratic traditions in educational administration. It will engage students in discussions of critical theory, feminisms, post-structuralism, anti-racism and other theoretical positions that have informed the development of critical-Democratic traditions in leadership and policy. It will also look specifically at what it means to engage in critical work in education and how this can be done through practice in leadership and policy study.


LHA1029 H

This course explores the practice of organizing people in the various structures used in elementary and secondary education systems. Starting with the earliest roots in organizational theory, this course will chart the evolution of ideas and practice in how people are organized in schools and school systems. While current ideas in organizational development focus on learning communities and collaborative cultures, the structures which house education are still firmly rooted in traditional Weberian bureaucratic beliefs. This course builds knowledge and understandings about the nature of organizations, and the link between structure and practice: do people act the way they do because they have been organized in a particular way, or do people create structures to support the way they work? The course will conclude with a review of some innovative approaches to organizing people in education, and examine questions about the degree to which these new organizations will produce better outcomes for educators and students.


LHA1029 H

This course is the first cross-program course to be offered in the newly configured department of Leadership, Higher, and Adult Education. Six professors (Bascia, Childs, Flessa, Magnusson, Mirchandani, Mojab) have collaborated in the design of an interdisciplinary examination of educational controversies in the three relevant fields. The course is open to students in all programs. Course requirements include attendance at all class meetings (Fridays).


LHA1029 H

This course offers a broad survey of contemporary research, theory and debates in Sociology of Education. It will be useful to students whose interests do not lie predominately in sociology, since it addresses a wide range of education issues at both K-12 and post secondary levels. Taking this course will prepare students to conduct research on many educational topics, and will also expose them to sociological thinking about social inequality, socialization and organizations. Schooling is a core institution in modern society, and is central for understanding emerging forms of economy, inequality, and social organization. This course will focus on trends that have shaped education in the modern era, particularly over the past 30 years. Most of the reading material will be by sociologists, grounded in empirical research, and will be North America-based, though we will look at international trends. The course is organized by 3 major connections between schools and society: social organization, selection, and socialization. Each section will explore major theoretical and empirical traditions in the area. The section on social organization begins by investigating the huge expansion of 20th century secondary and higher education, and their links to economic changes. The section on selection covers the bread and butter topic of inequalities in school attainment, but also includes two weeks on how educational structures are evolving to shape selection in new ways. The final section examines the socializing role of education, examining both how schools shape students but also have the influence of schools is either limited or channeled by youth culture and changing parenting cultures. In addition, we will add a unique discussion in which we apply micro- sociology, focusing on Interaction Ritual theory, to schooling. The course ends with a special look at current trends in higher education.


LHA1029 H

School language policy-making is a developing activity of importance for educational administrators in pluralist societies. A language policy is a firm plan for action addressing the first - or minority - language problems of a school, a college, a board, or some other educational agency. The goal of this course is for participants to identify language issues and problems that need addrressing in a single educational setting of their own choice. The course addresses the administration of all kinds of language activities in education: mother-tongue teaching; second-language learning; language maintenance; bilingual education; minority-culture schooling; community-language teaching; and gender and language. A subtext of the course's seminars is the integration of issues of social justice and power into the development of coherent and workable policies that are seen as agreed plans for action.


LHA1029 H

This course examines salient facets of health, illness, and illness prevention in the context of education. Incorporating micro and macro-level analyses, students will explore relationships among: (1) experiences of health and illness in an educational context; (2) health and quality of working life; (3) health awareness and illness prevention through education; (4) program evaluation and health education; (5) educational administration; and (6) social policy, health, and education.


LHA1029 H

This course provides an introduction to issues of diversity, equity and inclusion and the implications for leadership in schools, other educational organizations and school communities. Theories and practices of power, privilege, marginalization and inclusion as they relate to such issues as poverty, race, cultural diversity, gender, gender orientation, special needs and mental health will be explored. A focus will be placed on probing assumptions and considering multiple perspectives on these issues. The course will stress links between research and practice to promote advocacy and social change.


LHA1029 H

The purpose of this course is to provide students in the interdepartmental urban education M.Ed. Cohort with a concluding, capstone course. It follows their year long action research "internship" course. The course will use their action research projects as the primary building block for work in this course, which will include writing for and presenting research findings for multiple (professional, academic) audiences. This course is open only to Urban Education Cohort students, i.e., those students who took the year-long CTL1799 course on urban education during the 2007--2008 school year.


LHA1029 H




LHA1029 H




LHA1029 H

The Public educational system is expected to develop students' attitudes, skills and knowledge in order to produce responsible citizens in a democratic society. The system is viewed as the great social equalizer but, by its nature, it leaves the needs of many unanswered, especially with the advent of globalization, multiculturalism and commercialization of public education. This course will examine the different experiential and alternative educational models and practices and will analyze, through the use of research literature, their capacity to suit particular training and learning niches not covered by publically funded schools in area such as: decision making, leadership, crisis management, group dynamics, team skills, character and capacity building, delinquent rehabilitation, etc. Models and practices to be addressed include, among others, private and confessional schools, sail training (ASTA, ISTA), class afloat schools, study/adventure/research at sea, leadership schools, expeditionary learning school, outward bound, field study programs.


LHA1029 H

Some unique problems, presented to the administrator placed in special structures or environments, are examined with a view to developing appropriate applications of administrative processes. Depending upon resources of staff and needs of students electing this course, it will cover the administration of any one of, or combination of, the following: programs of special education, colleges and other institutions of higher education, large urban complexes, areas presenting special sociocultural problems, computer-assisted administration, and comparative educational administration.


LHA1029 H

Public education systems have been the focus of a wide range of accountability policies over the past decade. This course will develop students' understandings of the concept of accountability, examine the major different approaches to holding schools and districts more accountable, review evidence concerning the intended and unintended consequences of accountability policies and develop the implications for those in leadership roles in schools and districts. Students will be expected to write a critical analysis of one major approach to educational accountability and work with a small group of colleagues on a case problem related to the implementation of an accountability policy in a school.


LHA1029 H

In an era of expanding educational enrolments and attainment and rapidly growing world income inequality, equity and excellence of national education systems are seen as key routes to equality of opportunity, economic growth and competitiveness. This course will explore questions of how educational equity and excellence are defined and measured, how they are related to social and educational policies and whether they are competing or complementary goals. We will discuss a variety of theoretical and disciplinary perspectives from sociology, economics, psychology and education, and their views on status attainment and mobility, human capital, organization of the curriculum and opportunity to learn. Using this framework, we will review recent empirical evidence on macro-level patterns of educational equity and excellence across countries and over time and the role of educational institutions and social and welfare policies in shaping these patterns. Finally, we will examine the history, use and abuse of international data in educational policy- making, with particular emphasis on large-scale cross-national assessments and how particular countries gain prominence as world models of educational equity and/or excellence. The objective of the course is for students to become informed and critical consumers and users of international evidence in educational policy- making.


LHA1029 H

The purpose of this course is to require educational administration master's degree students, many of whom aspire to or currently occupy important administrative roles in their schools and districts, to explore the following questions: *What should school administrators know about racial, ethnic, and economic inequalities? *How should school administrators learn about racial and ethnic inequalities and poverty? *Once school admoinistrators know this information, what should--and can--they do about it on the job?


LHA1029 H

This course will explore issues and problems encountered by students in conducting research in Educational Administration. Students will identify problems encountered in their research experience, and solution strategies will be addressed by the class. Prerequisite: TPS1003 or Permission of instructor


LHA1029 H

Sociocultural diversity is a feature of the populations of both Canada and the United States. This course seeks to explore the social, historical, and policy contexts within which policies for social justice in education have developed in Canada and the United States and to situate this understanding in the scope of critical policy study. We are particularly interested in comparing and contrasting the policy response of cities like Toronto, London, and Buffalo to policy issues related to "safe schools," language education, citizenship, and aboriginal students: Note: The course will be conducted alongside courses taught by Professor Katina Pollock at University of Western Ontario and Professor Sue Winton at University of Buffalo. Three classes will involve students from all three campuses. The first of these three classes will be held in Toronto, the second in Buffalo, and the third in London (Ontario). Please note that these three classes will be held on


LHA1030 H

An examination of the current context of legal discourse related to the practical exigencies of present-day school experience. A detailed study of statutory and common law sources under which educators operate. The law is not immutable. Emphasis on negligence, malpractice, human rights and the school system, teacher rights, and student discipline and the Young Offenders Act and Zero Tolerance.


LHA1040 H

This course provides an introduction to educational policy, leadership and change in general and to this program in particular by focusing on foundational concepts and theories significant to the understanding of education and educational administration. It offers a critical examination of a wide range of topics central to educational administration, educational policy, leadership and change, such as organization, community, power, authority, change, difference, leadership, and values. This examination will take into account major historical developments in the field as well as differing theoretical stances or paradigms, such as positivism, functionalism, interpretivism, critical pedagogy, feminism, post-structuralism and post-modernism. The course will help students understand how to use theory to make sense of educational practice in productive ways. NOTE: All master's candidates are strongly recommended to take TPS1040 as one of the first courses in their program.


LHA1041 H

This course will focus on the social and policy contexts in which elementary and secondary educators work. Students will be exposed to a variety of issues related to schooling in a diverse and complex environment such as: differing purposes, philosophies, and values of education; multiculturalism and social justice; equity issues related to race, class, gender, and language; parental influences on schooling; the relationship of schooling to the labor market and the economy; choice of school and program; decentralization and centralization; standards and accountability; educational finance; school reform; educational and non-educational pressure groups and stakeholders. Through an exploration of these or related topics, this course will help students to continue to develop their understanding of different paradigms and methods used in research in educational administration, leadership, policy and change. NOTE: All master's candidates are strongly recommended to take TPS1041 as one of their first courses in their program.


LHA1042 H

jjThis course is designed to acquaint students with the practices and issues associated with administration, organization, and leadership in educational organizations with diverse student populations. Students will have the opportunity to critically analyse and appraise the practices and issues involved in the administration and leadership of such schools. They will also have the chance to probe and clarify their own conceptions of, and attitudes toward, multiethnic and anti-racist education generally and leadership in such school organizations specifically, in ways that will assist them with their own administrative practices.


LHA1045 H

School language policy-making is a developing activity of importance for educational administrators in pluralist societies. A language policy is a firm plan for action addressing the first- or minority-language problems of a school, a college, a board, or some other educational agency. The goal of this course is for participants to identify language issues and problems that need addressing in a single educational settting of their own choice. The course addresses the administration of all kinds of language activities in education: mother-tongue teaching; second-language learning; language maintenance; bilingual education; minority-culture schooling; community-language teaching; and gender and language. A subtext of the course's seminars is the integration of issues of social justice and power into the development of coherent and workable policies that are seen as agreed plans for action.


LHA1047 H

The course explores the meaning of classroom change from the teacher's perspective, addressing such issues as contemporary views of learning, the nature of teacher development, and the context of teaching. The perspective is then used to better appreciate how those in school leadership roles can facilitate efforts by teachers to improve their own practices, as well as meaningfully respond to out-of-school pressures for


LHA1048 H

A companion course to 1047. Contemporary conceptions of leadership are examined for their value in helping present schools improve and future schools serve their publics well. Understanding of expert leadership is developed through the study not only of expert leaders' behaviors, but also of their feelings, values, and problem-solving strategies. The formal and informal experiences that contribute to the development of leadership expertise will be examined.


LHA1050 H

This course has been designed to be the final course for students in the 10-course M.Ed. Program in Educational Administration. The course provides an opportunity for students to explore and develop a comprehensive view of the field of educational administration, through a series of seminars designed to help summarize, integrate and consolidate knowledge of the field. Students will link particular problems in practice to the theoretical bases of the field, through the lenses of the major strands of our program: change, leadership, policy and social diversity. There will be a focus on analysis, synthesis and application, building a deeper understanding, situated in the broader field. The culmination of this course will be the creation of a comprehensive portfolio reflecting the student's understanding of the breadth and depth of the field.


LHA1052 H

Specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing upon topics of particular interest to the student that are not included in available courses. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic.


LHA1060 H

This course is the first of two courses to develop people to become school principals in Ontario. A key component of the course is the critical evaluation and focus on current research in the areas related to leadership practices and their effects, instructional leadership, education change and reform efforts. The course's content includes a critical awareness of current problems associated with educational leadership practice and application to current issues and problems in education informed by cutting-edge research and professional practice. The outcome of these courses is to hone the judgment of practitioners within the educational setting. Through the assignments students must demonstrate originality in the application of new


LHA1061 H

This is the second of two courses which explores the role of the principal, one of the most influential roles in our educational system. It provides a foundation for candidates assuming the role of principal or vice- principal in Ontario schools and is one component of ongoing professional learning focused on the development of the personal and professional knowledge, and the skills and practices that lead to exemplary practice in the role of principal. The program is designed to support candidates in becoming reflective educational leaders who are informed consumers of education research in their ongoing professional growth, and who can lead effectively in the dynamic, diverse contexts of Ontario, characterized by rapidly changing


LHA1100 H

Designed to assist students to develop an understanding of and an identity with the field of adult education. Major philosophical, historical, and conceptual bases are examined; also contemporary agencies and programs, issues, and trends in the practice of adult education. It is required that all Master's students include either LHA1100H or LHA1102H in their program of study.


LHA1101 H

This course introduces students to basic principles and processes of program planning, and how they apply to adult educational contexts. Relevant literatures and cases will be examined to illustrate different approaches to planning with particular emphasis on non-profit, public sector and community settings.


LHA1102 H

This course involves the study of innovative models of community development in such areas as housing, childcare, healthcare including mental health services, social service provision, and education, as well as models of community economic development. There is a combination of case studies (both Canadian and international), papers on alternative policies, and critical social analyses both of why there is a need for community development and the significance of this phenomenon for a broader social-change strategy. The community development strategies utilized in the course are based primarily on non-profit and cooperative approaches. It is required that all Master’s students include either LHA1100H (previously AEC1100H) or LHA1102H (previously AEC1102H) in their program of study.


LHA1103 H

A critical examination of the research process. Qualitative and quantitative research approaches will be explored as an introduction to the formal inquiry process. Typically, students will be exposed to a range of research perspectives through conversational interviews, readings, and small group and whole class discussions. Students will begin to conceptualize their own research project. Particular attention will be given to fostering understandings of the ethical, procedural, and political implications of research work as well as an understanding of what it means to be "the researcher" and "the


LHA1104 H

This course involves the study of a variety of perspectives in critical and community education as they relate to development and social change. Key issues in theory and practice will be examined through the study of classic writing in popular education, community organizing, feminist, socialist, anti-racist, anti-colonial and indigenous education/organizing.


LHA1105 H

This course articulates various theoretic grounding for qualitative research and helps students become conversant with a wide variety of qualitative methodologies (i.e., grounded theory, feminist interviewing, ethnography, participatory research, bibliographic analysis, and institutional ethnography.) Gathering of information through observation, participatory observation, dialogue, and collection of documents will all be considered. Emphasis is on both understanding and practice. Learners will design or co-design a concrete piece of research and take it through the ethical review process. They will also present on at least one methodology. In line with this, they will learn about ethical conundrums, about matching methodologies with objectives and values, about methods for choosing participants. There is special emphasis on becoming critically aware as researchers - on understanding and integrating issues of power and difference.


LHA1106 H

This course begins where Part I leaves off. Learners will deepen their knowledge of a wide variety of qualitative research methodologies. They will gain skills interviewing, judging research, exploring dilemmas, and becoming critically aware as researchers. Their primary activity will be carrying out and completing the research project designed and approved in Part I. Giving and getting help from other classmates is an integral part of the process. (Prerequisite: AEC1405H)


LHA1107 H

This course examines the application of small group theory and leadership models to team development within organizational settings. It addresses such issues as power and difference among members, equity in leadership, peer performance assessment, multi-rater feedback and team process consultation. It provides an opportunity to examine, both theoretically and experientially, the development of a team as it forms, confronts interpersonal and group conflict, and evolves from dependence on the team leader to interdependence and shared leadership among team members. This course is particularly relevant to current workplace designs, where matrix models, cross-functional team arrangements and ad hoc project teams dominate new organizational forms. The course is held on seven alternate weeks for a full day each session, in order to permit both conceptual exploration and the application of theory to actual team development.


LHA1109 H

This course will be of interest to a wide range of practitioners, including: activists, popular educators, and counsellors. The context in which it is offered is a world increasingly populated by disenfranchised people. The intent is to help practitioners gain a fuller understanding of the populations in question and become more skilled and creative as allies and activitists. The specific populations focused on are: psychiatric survivors, people who are homeless, people who have been imprisoned, people who use illicit drugs, undocumented people, and sex trade workers. Learners will gain knowledge of the ABC's of strategic activism, with particular emphasis on how to modify strategy to fit the populations and movements in question. An accompanying emphasis is use of the arts in resistance work with these populations. Examples of art forms drawn on include: theatre (including theatre of the oppressed), puppetry, and video-making. Popular education is integrated. Perspectives include: feminism, anti-racism, Marxism, transformative justice, antipsychiatry, labeling theory, anarchism, and the philosophies of nonviolent resistance. The classes go between lectures, student presentations, film and video analysis, rehearsals, consultations, exercises, and guest presentations.


LHA1110 H

A theoretical and experiential study of stategies for teaching adults, and of the procedures educators can use in group settings to enhance the development of learning processes. Students will explore personal institutional and societal variables that shape teaching/Learning environments, examine the factors that promote or hinder success, experience and analyze different teaching approaches, and develop a personal approach to the teaching/learning process.


LHA1111 H

This course explores the nature(s) of trauma and the different ways of working with survivors. The emphasis is on difference-different types of trauma, different ways of coping, and the significance of different and multiple identities. Work with adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse is particularly highlighted. Other areas include survivors of: homophobic assault, ritual abuse, residential schools, refugee traumatization, war trauma, trauma associated with imprisonment, trauma associated with psychiatric intervention, and second generation trauma (e.g., children of Holocaust survivors). The trauma inherent in systemic oppressions, the fact that we live in an oppressive and violent society, and the implications for practitioners is emphasized throughout. While the primary emphasis in on practitioners as counsellors, other roles are also considered, including: advocates, befrienders, community workers, and literacy workers. Practitioner self-care in light of vicarious traumatization is given special consideration. Attention is divided between individual work, group work, and community work. The course is counter-hegemonic. Dominant perspectives include: critical theory, feminism, and existentialism. Permission of Instructor is required to enrol. Failure to contact instructor by email bburstow@oise.utoronto.ca may result in not being able to take the course.


LHA1112 H

This course is designed for advanced students who wish to explore life history and narrative approaches for research or therapeutic work through a process of self study. Course work will involve class discussions of narrative writings and a major personal project. Students will undertake an indepth self-exploration through personal narrative combined with intensive imagination, art work, or meditative practice. The final report will include reflection on the personal change process experience.


LHA1113 H

This course will focus on gender processes in work settings. We will identify patriarchal rules and expectations which run through contemporary workplaces (factories, offices, homes, hospitals, shopfloors, etc.) and propose ways in which normalizing discourses which reify gender hierarchies can be challenged. The course will focus on how "gender," "race" and "class" can be conceptualized as processes rather than demographic attributes possessed by individual workers. We will trace the connections between gendered jobs and gendered workers and explore how individuals learn to "do gender" in organizational settings.


LHA1114 H

An exploration of adult learning in several societies, with attention given to the historic, demographic, political, and economic factors. This course introduces a number of methods of comparison particularly applicable to adult education, and provides an introduction to the field of comparative studies.


LHA1117 H

The purposes of this course are fourfold: (1) to explore different consulting styles; (2) to explore the stages of the consulting process; (3) to explore the models of consulting stages; (4) to emphasize the practice of consulting skills in simulated consulting situations.


LHA1119 H

Peter Senge’s concept of the Learning Organization has now been embedded in organizational thinking since 1990. Many organizations have struggled to create learning cultures with varying degrees of success and much has been discovered about the factors that contribute to or inhibit this success. In this course, we will look at the Learning Organization as Senge and others have conceived it through the lens of productive conversation. The course will employ a variety of learning strategies including student presentations, theory bursts and organizational simulation. As part of our process, we will examine our own ability to create a learning organization within the class and the impact that our conversations have on the quality of our own learning.


LHA1122 H

Practicum in Adult Education and Community Development (Pass/Fail) This course provides an opportunity for students to put theoretical ideas they have learned in other courses into practice. Students will identify a placement setting and develop a project in consultation with the instructor. The practicum can be situated within any setting (examples include schools, private sector organizations, community groups, hospitals, etc.) within local, regional, national or international contexts. Suitable projects may include field-based work or internships which leads to the development of an associated research project, reflective paper, or the development of a curriculum or programme. Weekly discussions will normally be arranged which will provide for support, feedback and reflection.


LHA1131 H

Following the lead of American essayist Wendell Berry, who has argued that eating is an agricultural act, this course will focus on the idea that eating is also a pedagogical act. What do we learn, and unlearn, from the food we eat? How is the food on our plate connected to such issues as food systems, food politics, food justice, food security, food sovereignty and food movements? Can we consume our way into a more sustainable future, or does this simply reinforce our current unsustainable way of life? This course will explore these and other questions, keeping in mind that food can be a catalyst for learning, resistance and


LHA1131 H

This course focuses on the experiences of a generation of young adults who have come of age under the auspices of fiscal crisis, austerity and massive shifts in social policies landscapes, and recent upheavals and mobilizations against the state across North and South America, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Young adults today are uniquely positioned within the cultural, economic, and policy landscapes of growing conditions of social and material insecurity. While adolescence is a much-researched area of educational scholarship, young people situated in the category of 'emerging adulthood' are an under-researched population, particularly young adults who experience racialization and resulting forms of social vulnerability (Arnett, 2000). Emerging adulthood includes the period between 18 and 30 years of age where adolescents become more independent and explore various life possibilities. It is a time of profound change, when young adults acquire the skills and education they need for jobs and careers, when they establish households and relationships, begin families, and begin to contribute to society in meaningful ways. It is also a time in which younge people gain political status vis-à-vis the state and become subject to rules and regulations concerning criminal justice and financial institutions and can experience an attenuating loss of social supports. There is a growing body of research to suggest that the forms of 'crisis' experienced by young people today will have a profound effect on their transition to adulthood, their participation and engagement in traditional social and political institutions, and their ability to participate 'meaningful' in the knowledge economy. In the context of this 'crisis of youth,' it is essential that adult educators begin a critical analysis of the social and material conditions that will inform the growth, development, and engagement of the next generation of adult learners.


LHA1131 H

While industrial capitalism grows via the enclosure and outright destruction of the Commons, human wellbeing and sustainability today depend not only upon the protection of the Commons (economic, ecological, cultural and electronic) but their extension in most areas of human experience. Drawing on contributions by all faculty members in the ‘Community Development and Social Justice’ specialization of the AECD Program, the course will introduce students to the concept of the ‘Commons’ and commons-related policy, education and activism in economic, social, cultural and spiritual realms.


LHA1131 H

A course that will examine in depth a topic of particular relevance not already covered in regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session course schedules.


LHA1131 H

With special attention to the role of education and work, this course will look at the political and economic context generating calls for a Green New Deal, the varied actors and organizations involved in the new populism, and the new organizing and development strategies being raised by the emerging coalitions. In the face of global climate, financial and geo-military crises, a vibrant new movement for environmental and social justice is rapidly transforming discourse and policy on inequality, economic development, and environmental action at local and global levels. Organized labour, marginalized communities, environmental justice advocates, values-driven business networks, feminists, first peoples, and social entrepreneurs are major players in this heterogeneous movement.


LHA1131 H

This course asks a major question: what is feminist research? We answer this question by (a) examining major feminist frameworks and their assumptions, (b) exploring the various techniques used in feminist research, (c) discussing the methodological and ethical issues of conducting feminist research, and (d) examining research partnership issues between academics and community-based researchers. This course aims to provide an overview of the major issues in feminist research of interest to adult educators.


LHA1131 H

The course explores the sources, dimensions, processes and effective strategies of conflict management and mediation in teams. It provides an in depth understanding of the theory and best practices practitioners employ to analyze, and leverage conflict for team and organizational outcomes. Students will learn intervention approaches for mediation of conflict between individuals, teams and handing of difficult people and situations. Students will also gain negotiation skills to facilitate decision-making and problem solving. Conflict is fundamental to human organizations. Hence, the underpinning thesis of this course is that conflict management is a core organizational competency and process. Understanding, managing and maximizing conflict is therefore critical to team and organizational effectiveness.


LHA1131 H

This course explores the sources, dimensions, processes and effective strategies of conflict management in organizations. It provides an in depth understanding of the theory and best practices practitioners employ to analyze, influence policy and leverage conflicts for organizational outcomes. Students will learn intervention approaches for mediation of conflicts between individuals, teams and handing of difficult people and situations. Students also gain negotiation skills to facilitate decision-making and problem solving.


LHA1131 H

This course will focus on the concept of Leadership in Organizations with emphasis on issues that are currently in the center of interest for researchers and theorists in the field. Students will be offered updated readings, participate in discussion and in analysis of theory and research questions relevant to the concept. A special effort will be put into the formulation of unresolved questions for further inquiry, and perspectives of cross cultural and alternative organizations.


LHA1131 H

This course will explore the limits and possibilities of popular education as an approach to building capacity in Canadian social movements, particularly unions and their coalition partners. An emphasis on participatory approaches will be offered. .


LHA1131 H

This course provides an opportunity for students to put theoretical ideas they have learned in other courses into practice. Students will identify a placement setting and develop a project in consultation with the instructor. The practicum can be situated within any setting (examples include schools, private sector organizations, community groups, hospitals, etc.) within local, regional, national or international contexts. Suitable projects may include field-based work or internships which leads to the development of an associated research project, reflective paper, or the development of a curriculum or programme. Weekly discussions will normally be arranged which will provide for support, feedback and reflection.


LHA1131 H

In European cultures, knowledge has been associated with power, and literacy has been associated with knowledge. But the nature of knowledge has always been contested, and, at the beginning of the twentieth century, the relationship between knowledge and literacy is being contested as well. In this course, we will examine the relationship between knowledge, literacy and power in light of social practice theory, including emerging theory in the New Literacy Studies, which sees literacy as social practices rather than as a repertoire of objectively specified skills. We will examine the implications of social practice theory for social change movements, with a focus on learning at the community level. Students will be encouraged to bring their own interests in learning at the community level to the discussion.


LHA1131 H

This course will focus on a selection of research strategies and methodologies that are suitable for small- scale, interpretive research/inquiry in organizational settings. This might include a wide range of sites such as businesses, public institutions (schools, hospitals, government offices), community/volunteer agencies, cooperative/collective and/or non-profit enterprises, and activist organizations (local, national or international in scope). The course will deal with traditional concerns of methodology such as ethical practice, standards for trustworthy results, the positioning/subjectivity of the researcher, and competing claims around voice and legitimacy. But it will address these questions in the special theoretical and practical context of thorny questions about the 'invisible' nature of much organizational action, the status of personal 'experience', and 'documents' as data, and the significance of organizational subcultures and power politics for research design, conduct and analysis. .


LHA1131 H

Some of the most pressing problems affecting community wellness can be traced to how stable infrastructures are eroding, resulting in underemployment, insecure housing, expulsions from prime real estate, and criminalization of the racialized, migrant, and indigenous poor. This course provides some important conceptual frameworks that help us understand how these themes are interconnected through militarized finance capitalism that is also alternatively referred to as 'the new economy', 'casino economics', and 'crisis economics'. As devastating as these trends are, never have possibilities for transformation been more accessible through a myriad of inspiring social movements and innovative community activism and development. This course provides some critical literacy for organizing, and some hands-on experience in


LHA1131 H

This course examines the complex and conflictual relations between women and revolutionary struggles and focuses on a number of theoretical and empirical issues relevent to the Middle East and North Africa context. The course is open to both senior level undergraduate and graduate students with different requirements.


LHA1131 H

The primary theme of this course is how social positions in work organizations and community settings affect inequalities in individual health. The course also examines socioeconomic inequality at the community level, and its effect upon social capital, and the influence of social capital on morbidity and mortality. Both topics will relate to the concept of successful aging. Research on Israeli kibbutzim will be used to illustrate many of the concepts.


LHA1131 H

There are increasing pressures within organizations for rapid change to remain competitive and viable. This course will examine various change models and explore strategies for identifying and dealing with obstacles, addressing the roles of management and facilitators. .


LHA1131 H

This special-topics course will introduce students to the field of environmental adult education. As a form of critical pedagogy, it concentrates on the the interface between education and the environment. The task of environmental adult education involves helping us to learn more sustainable ways of thinking, feeling and acting in the world. This course will cover issues associated with environmental adult education, such as globalization, sustainablity, social justice, spirituality, community, gender, energy and ecological literacy. It will also examine the role of adult education in an environmentally challenged world. And finally, it will explore the contribution of transformative learning in seeking more sustainable ways of life.


LHA1131 H

Over the past two decades there has been an unprecedented interest in workplace training across western economies. Employers are told that if they spend more on employee development they will see the benefits reflected in their bottom line. Employees are increasingly required to have training and development plans as part of their job; it appears ‘lifelong learning’ is becoming mandatory. And governments are focused on improving “employability skills” to remain competitive in a globalised economy. Yet there seems to be little agreement among stakeholders about goals, methods, and outcomes to be expected from this training imperative. This course will explore this complex and contested terrain of workplace training. It will emphasize case studies from Australian practitioner-researchers who use holistic, action-research approaches to workplace learning design that aim to integrate concerns of all the stakeholders.


LHA1131 H

The financialization of accumulation, intensifyhing since the 1970's, has lead to an escalating series of world economic and political crises. Within adult and highter education, the racialized and gendered effects of financialization are evident in many ways including a reduction in opportunities for fulltime employment, rising levels of personal debt, criminalization, and exposure to social and political turmoil. We will use an anti-racist, anti-colonial and feminist framework to examine these classed dynamics and their implications for health and community services and the social organization of learning and labour.


LHA1131 H

This is an in-depth reading course that follows my regular semester course on Power Equity.


LHA1131 H

Understanding Wall St. and the current economy as well as possible alternatives is essential for those interested in education for positive social change. Over the last three decades a power shift has taken place within capitalism, from manufacturing to financial capital. This course will look at the nature of this change, especially the transition from investment to speculation; and examine the educational and political significance of the dramatic redistribution of wealth from the poor and middle-class to the "One percent." It will also examine the alternatives to what's referred to as the Casino Economy and transitional strategies for redirecting financial and material resources from Wall St. to Main St. community economic development. Particular focus will be on the role of emerging information technologies—both their unhealthy channelling into Wall St. speculation, and their appropriate application in various forms of community investment—including locavesting, pension fund SRI, green micro-finance, local stock exchanges, crowdfunding, the "Slow Money" movement, and the movement for basic income guarantees. An added option for the course could be to include at least two major (public) guest presentations by noted experts in these fields: e.g. Les Leopold, Amy Cortese, Eugene Ellmen, Michael Shuman, etc.


LHA1131 H

This course will focus on the growing “culture of accountability” that has been emerging across the industrialised world for a decade, accompanied by growing controversies about its impact, particularly on the voluntary sector and small community-based organizations. The course will draw on literature from Canada, the UK, the U.S. and Australia to examine these dynamics, putting special emphasis on adult literacy organizations as a case in point.


LHA1131 H

The focus of this course is on Aboriginal/Indigenous thoughts and worldviews and how Aboriginal and non- Aboriginal educators, administrators, and facilitators may use the knowledge in their own work. This course is adapted from an earlier version and will continue to explore culturally appropriate and culturally based Aboriginal education. Participants will engage in the discourse of self-determination of Aboriginal people through elders' wisdom, traditional knowledge and teachings. Growing from the nature of the topics, readings and modes of class instruction, a learning community will be developed towards an authentic appreciation of the values, heritage, diversity, politics and sensations that Aboriginal people bring to our lives and experiences.


LHA1131 H

This course investigates questions of health and illness in variuos organizations and occupations from three perspectives: the medical, the behavioural, the social/environmental. All three models are important, personally, organizationally, and politically. They formulate distinct ways of thinking, speaking, knowing, acting and transforming personal health, occupational health, and the health of the whole society. The course will examine qualitative and quantitative data, explore public policies and organizational policies, and sample rich literature on illness production.


LHA1131 H

Selected issues related to social, political, spiritual and cultural factors that impact on the educational quality of life of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada resulting from colonialism and oppression will be examined. Related connections to Indigenous Peoples throughout the world will be made. Selected issues will be examined with a view toward understanding the need for transforming educational and research knowledge to reflect Aboriginal and Indigenous wisdom and strategies for solutions. Themes and models reflecting the movement toward the development and establishment of Aboriginal education initiatives grounded in Aboriginal philosophies and perspectives for community healing and wellness and Aboriginal participation and leadership in Canadian society will be examined. This course draws on knowledge from theories and practice of Aboriginal and Indigenous methodologies, antiracism education, qualitative research methodologies, oral histories/narratives, and Elders' wisdom. Students will be encouraged to explore various issues that impact on teaching and learning from pre-school to higher education, community development, and adult education settings. .


LHA1131 H

This course will introduce students to the role of research in the field of adult literacy and the principles and practice of research-in-practice. It will include the following elements: explore the rationale and significance of practioner-based research and its unique potential for reducing the divisions among literacy theory, policy and practice; consider the rewards and incentives as well as the barriers and challenges faced by those doing practioner-based research; introduce and provide skills needed to define a research problem, to locate and use other materials related to your topic, to organise a process of data collection, and produce research products for dissemination; become aware of sources of funding support, peer support or mentoring to sustain the process, and further research training if desired. .


LHA1131 H

This seminar is designed to support M.Ed. students who are interested in conducting a piece of research as part of their programs. The course will support students in the process of writing a Major Research Paper. Issues to be discussed will include: choosing a topic, developing an argument, working with faculty who are experts in the field, and organizing the writing process. The class will be participatory, and weekly readings will be assigned on the various parts of the writing journey. During the course, students will complete their ethics reviews, complete the research involved and write their major research papers. This course requires two pre- or co-requisites: AEC1183 (Master’s Thesis Seminar) and at least one Research Methods Course.


LHA1131 H

Learning to read and write as an adult involves, among other things, learning to recognize one’s own language in writing, and to transform one’s own language into writing. In this course, we will explore the range of ways in which both oral language and written language can be related through the analysis of case studies of adult literacy learning. These case studies will be based on the experiences of diverse individuals learning diverse literacy practices. The case studies will be drawn from published research within the social practice framework, from participants in the course, and from the course director’s current research. Relevant scholarly papers from the fields of linguistics, anthropology, psychology, philosophy and history will be read and discussed against the background of these case studies.


LHA1131 H

Experiences of violence are widespread and have major implications for teaching and learning, particularly in the adult literacy setting. This course will explore societal assumptions about diverse forms of violence and oppression, examine research on the impact of violence on learning, and explore ways to address these impacts, including ways to facilitate holistic learning. You will have the opportunity to experience holistic approaches in class activities and assignments. The course will be an opportunity to conceptualize educational practices which take into account the impacts of violence on learning and support learning for all.


LHA1131 H

This course will focus on work-related learning in the context of migration. Reading theories of migration in conjunction with theories of learning, students will develop an understanding of settlement and work-related experiences of immigrants and refugees in Canada and globally. Two forms of migration will be explored: movements of people and movements of jobs (i.e., labour markets). The emphasis of the course will be on the learning undertaken by diverse groups of (im)migrant workers as they navigate changing labour markets.


LHA1131 H

This course will examine power equity dynamics in the learning contexts of gender, class, race, sexual orientation and human-earth relationships. A developmental learning model will be utilized that examines issues relating to power dominance in the above areas and a learning perspective that suggests a way out of dominance relationships into more equitable modes of relating. Power relations will be examined in dynamic terms suggesting directions toward the transformation of relationships along more equitable lines. Issues of intimacy, abuse and dominance will be examined within a model of the transformation of relationships that moves from oppressive to more partnership modes of relationships.


LHA1131 H

This course introduces the theories, methodologies, policies, and practices of lifelong learning within the context of current global social, political and economic change. It examines the impact of globalization on educational policy and workplace learning and training as they relate to lifelong learning. The course, in particular, examines how changes in policy, governance, and education are initiated and reinforce changes in the economy and work. It analyzes ways in which the international division of skills, training, and knowledge- creation arises in relation to the emerging global economy. The course also critically reflects on the centrality of race, gender, class, sexuality, and disability in lifelong learning policy , theory, and practice and analyzes their implications for research areas in the field of adult education.


LHA1131 H

This course will examine the role of corporations as contributors to building a global 'wisdom economy' - an economy where corporate activity supports and fosters social and ecological health. The course is organized around the United Nations Global Compact Initiative, which has developed nine principles relating to human rights, labour standards and environment.


LHA1131 H

This course offers a practical approach to understanding and doing effective advocacy work, from either inside or outside of the organization. It will teach a method for identifying and mapping work practices that are central to decision making. Students will undertake a practical project in small teams, building an exploratory account of an organization/workplace issue that is of interest to them.


LHA1131 H

In recent years, mainly because of New Literacy Studies research, our knowledge of the variety and complexity of literacy practices has grown substantially. Given this knowledge, the abstract idea of literacy as a universal, specifiable set of skills has become untenable. And if this abstract idea of literacy is untenable, views of literacy learning that incorporate this idea have become untenable as well. We need new views of literacy learning. This course presents a view of adult literacy learning that integrates the findings of the New Literacy Studies into learning theory. This view shifts our focus from learning by means of instruction to learning by means of engagement in "communities of practice." Communities of practice may exist in geographical areas, cultural communities, families, workplaces, community organizations, and among any group of people who find meaning, identity and community through shared practices. Instruction is seen not as the primary means to literacy learning but as a crucial secondary support. Understanding literacy learning in this way has important consequences for teaching, program design, community development and adult education policy. In this course, we will undertake the important job of rethinking literacy from our various vantage points as teachers, learners, researchers and people engaged with communities of practice.


LHA1131 H

The course employs cultural studies methods to survey the historical and contemporary representation of Aboriginal Peoples in popular culture and mass media. Introduction to basic techniques for evaluating, analysing and understanding the construction of Native identities as communicated through museum exhibits, film, television, and other media. Examination of stereotyping and how media can be used to perpetuate and challenge stereotypes, cultural appropriation, media production and impact.


LHA1131 H

LGBT communities have been active in organizing for change in the workplace, community, and institutions of learning. We will examine emergent questions these changes pose for adult educators especially in relation to health, security and education. In what ways are queer interventions shaped by the politics of race and gender? How can we connect learning spaces to transnational rights movements? How do we locate queer interventions in terms of dynamics of neoliberal captialism and globalization?


LHA1131 H

This special topics course will introduce students to the emerging field of adult education for sustainability. As a form of critical pedagogy, it concentrates on the interface between education and sustainability. The task of adult education for sustainability involves helping us to learn our way out of unsustainable modes of thinking, feeling and acting in the world, and to learn our way in to more sustainable ways of life. This course will cover issues associated with adult education for sustainability, such as globalization, sustainable development, social justice, community, gender, energy and ecological literacy. It will also examine the role of adult education in an unsustainable world, and explore alternatives to our current unsustainable course.


LHA1131 H

This course provides a general overview of different traditions of social research. It will explore and compare the founding assumptions, the varied types of research questions asked and answered, the tools and techniques of data collection typically used, and differing approaches to analysis and formulation of conclusions in a range of research paradigms. It will explain and locate the use of such familiar research terms as objectivity, hypotheses, samples, standpoints, bias, and varying approaches to questions of validity, reliability and generalisability. It will explore the growing international controversy over 'evidence-based' policy in education/health/social services and its relation to the past twenty years of debate over culture and location in knowledge construction. The course will include guest appearances by experts and advocates for each of the major traditions explored. It will assist students who want to be more informed readers and users of research as well as those attempting to choose a suitable approach for their thesis research.


LHA1131 H

This course examines the epistemological underpinnings of Indigenous / Local knowledges in order to organically develop a working framework for Indigenous research, presentation and analysis. Topics may include the exploration and conceptions of Indigenous and Local knowledges at the global scale and at the community level; an introductory look at elder’s knowledge; the role of science in Indigenous societies; decolonization of education research practices, and the related development of an activity theory of aboriginal education models. Students will devise an Indigenous informal learning model, and be able to articulate on a chosen Indigenous sovereignty movement, and its relationship to political consciousness, and ecological sustainability practices.


LHA1132 H

The course shall contribute to the ongoing debate on the efficacy of Truth Commissions as vehicles of transitional justice. Women bear the brunt of gross violations and yet are excluded from processes that aim to design ways of correcting these injustices; these processes are also defined using patriarchal understandings of causes of conflict and their consequences. The course shall focus on the Kenyan Truth Commission design and process to analyse opportunities that are availed for transformative justice by Tuth


LHA1132 H

The main question this course takes off from is: "How is Idle no More as an Indigenous women led movement different from past movements and how is it changing the face of Indigenous land rights today"? The Course will be taught by Wanda Nanibush, the 2013 Dame Nita Barrow visitor. Wanda is an Anishinabe-kwe (Ojibway Woman) writer, scholar, artist, curator, community animator, arts consultant and Idle No More organizer. She has been instrumental in organizing Toronto’s major round dances, teach-ins, candle light marches, concerts, water ceremonies and vigils. She was behind the "Nation to Nation Now" symposia and "Building Unity To Action" meeting.


LHA1132 H

This course will be taught by Poonam Kathuria, founder and Director of SWATI (Society for Women's Action and Teaching Initiatives) in Gujurat, India, 2014 Dame Nita Barrow Distinguished Visitor at OISE. It will address major issues of women's organising for equality through the lends of the Indian women's movement from the mid-19th century through its resurgence in the 1970s to today. The movement's current strength is built on collective campaigns, alliance building, and solidarity withother social movements and with men in a masculinities perspective. The course will examine intersectionality and the powerful ways in which women's movements have incorporated the plurality of issues faced by women. Differences between western feminism and feminism as it has envolved in South Asia and colonized societies will be explored. For further information contact: Angela Miles at angela.miles@utoronto.ca, 416-978-0809.


LHA1132 H

The course is designed to make available to OISE students, courses on very different topics taught by Visiting feminist activist scholars from the South/ Majority World who are formatively involved in cutting edge networking and theory building in the field of Women in Development and Community Transformation. Each year the current holder of the Dame Nita Barrow Distinguished Visitor position in "Women in Development and Community Transformation" at OISE offers a course in her particular area of specialization under this Special Topic number.


LHA1132 H

This half course will be taught by the current Dame Nita Barrow Distinguished Visitor at OISE/UT, an eminent feminist leader from the global economic south. Each visitor will call on her own particular area of interest and experience to develop a course dealing with current issues of women, development, and community transformation in a global context and from a ‘majority world’ perspective. Information about current and past Visitors is available on the web at: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/cwse/


LHA1141 H

This course provides a theoretical framework for the adult educator's work within organizational settings. A variety of methods, including readings, audio-tapes, guest speakers and group discussion provide a broad overview of the evolution of Organization Development from early management theory to current practices in the field. The course offers an opportunity to evolve one's own perspective as a practising or aspiring organization consultant and provides a good introduction for those new to the field.


LHA1143 H

This course will provide students having little knowledge of feminism with an introductory overview of the basic principles of feminist analysis of society and education. It is designed for women and men who do not specialize in feminist studies but are interested in becoming acquainted with feminist analysis and its large implications for theory and practice. It should be especially useful for students who are facing issues of gender in their research, their work, or their personal lives and are interested in how gender intersects with


LHA1145 H

This course examines the theory and practice of conducting participatory and collaborative research that bridges the academic, workplace, and community divide, with an emphasis on research from feminist, anti- racist, and anti-colonial perspectives. In addition to readings, students will undertake a research project as part of the course requirement.


LHA1146 H

This course will focus on the impact of war on women and their rights. We will engage in critical analyses of contemporary conflicts and their impact on gender and education. Specifically, we will examine the link between war, globalization, nation-states and learning and the link between non-state, non-market forces and education. We will look at current feminist approaches to the study of war, violence and women's resistance and learning. The theoretical approach in this course is anti-racist and anti-imperialist feminism.


LHA1148 H

This course provides an introduction to workplace, organizational and economic democracy. Both case studies and relevant theory will be considered. Much of the material in the course will be interdisciplinary.


LHA1150 H

Critical approaches to organizations focus on how workplace change and development is experienced by diverse groups of women and men who work within organizations. Through this course, students will have the opportunity to develop analyses of language, power and inequality in a variety of organizational settings (companies, factories, NGOs, community groups, government units, churches, schools, family businesses, etc.) We will explore the methods frequently used to "restructure" these organizations (such as downsizing, outsourcing, contingent just-in-time policies) as well as develop critiques of recent trends which emphasize "empowerment", "TQM", "organizational learning" and "reengineering".


LHA1152 H

Specialized exploration, under the direction of a faculty member, of topics of particular interest to the student that are not included in existing courses. While credit is not given for a thesis topic proper, the study may be closely related to such a topic. Guidelines and Form are available from the website: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/ro/UserFiles/File/Graduate%20Registration/GradReg_ReqIndReadRsch.pdf This course can also be designed as a field-based practicum in adult education and/or community development in an agreed setting. The course will include reflection, research, and writing on issues raised in


LHA1156 H

Drawing on recent feminist and anti-racist scholarship, this course will analyze ways in which power and difference are enacted in contemporary workplaces. Students will explore how individual workers navigate the hierarchies they encounter in their workplaces as well as strategies of decolonization which challenge systemic forms of exclusion. The course will include case studies of migrant workers, foreign trained professionals, progressive managers, and workplace educators.


LHA1160 H

This is the foundation course for Transformative Learning studies. It is designed to introduce students to a global planetary perspective. The concept of a global world order will be examined from historic, critical, and visionary perspectives. Issues of development/underdevelopment, human rights, and social justice perspectives are considered. A critical understanding of social power relations will be highlighted in the areas of gender, class, and race dynamics. The topics are approached as interdependent dimensions within a holistic education perspective.


LHA1171 H

This course is designed to provide an interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of Aboriginal education in Canada. Emphasis is on understanding the influences of policies, programs, and institutions that affect the Aboriginal community in respect to Aboriginal education. One of the major data sources will be the report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. Aboriginal guest speakers will also comment on selected topics. Components of this course will include the Aboriginal world view; contemporary history/politics relevant to Aboriginal Peoples; and Aboriginal education and healing. Treaties were originally signed between First Nations and the Federal Government of Canada. These treaties for the most part have not been honoured. In this course we shall discuss the ways and means to redress this situation as we focus more specifically on issues relevant to Aboriginal education.


LHA1173 H

Theoretical perspectives on the development of one's sense of self, factors contributing to resiliency and vulnerability, and different approaches to coping with life stresses will be examined. Creative strategies for confronting challenges related to work, health, or personal growth issues will be explored.


LHA1180 H

This course provide a deeper understanding of Aboriginal worldviews and an appreciation of how this knowledge can enhance teaching, learning and research. Learners will examine philosophical views shared by Aboriginal people while honoring a diversity of identities, culture, language, and geographic locations. Course content may include Aboriginal cognitive styles, values and ethics, traditional teachings and indigenous methodologies. This course will promote an understanding and appreciation of Aboriginal perspectives and explore strategies for integrating this knowledge into the work of educators and researchers.


LHA1181 H

The objectives of this course are to (a) disrupt prevailing western scientific knowledge and education that privilege the intellect (frequently equated with the mind) over the body-spirit; and (b) explore notions of embodiment and what it may mean to cultivate embodied ways of knowing and learning. We achieve these objectives by (i) reading and looking at relevant materials that conceptualize body-mind-spirit as an interconnected whole, with an emphasis on Traditional Chinese Medicine; (ii) recording our reflections in a journal; and (iii) conducting Qi Gong (a form of ancient Chinese breathing and meditative exercises) as an experiential way of exploring embodied learning. In addition to gaining knowledge from course contents, students will acquire skills in group process.


LHA1182 H

This course discusses critical issues facing nonprofits, co-operatives, and the social economy, which is a bridging concept for organizations pursuing a social purpose. The course examines the differing organizational forms and accountability structures and the challenges faced by these organizations. Issues to be considered are: volunteering and how it can be valued; social enterprises and their increasing prominence in an age of government retrenchment; community economic development in low-income communities; and civil society organizations and their functions in encouraging social engagement and challenging social norms. The course views the social economy in relation to the government and business sectors, and attempts to understand the multiple roles of organizations in the social economy as they interact with the rest of society. The course materials include innovative case studies and adult education materials.


LHA1183 H

This seminar is designed to support Master's students in the process of writing a thesis or a substantial research paper. Issues to be discussed will include: choosing a topic, writing a proposal, developing an argument, selecting a supervisor, and organizing the writing process. The class will be participatory, and weekly readings will be assigned on the various parts of the thesis-writing journey. Class members will also receive instruction on effective library research techniques. In addition, students will have the opportunity to read completed theses and proposals. The course is required for all M.A. students. Full time M.A. students are encouraged to take this course at the start of their program. Part-time M.A. students should ideally take this course when they are ready to start working on their thesis proposals. The course is also open to M.Ed. Students who are interested in gaining research experience by writing a substantial research paper equivalent to a thesis.


LHA1184 H

This course will explore Indigenous ways of knowing and knowledge systems and how this knowledge might inform the work of teaching, learning and research. Course content may include indigenous research protocols, decolonizing methodologies, ethics and politics of researching and teaching in Aboriginal communities, indigenous knowledge in the academy, intellectual property rights, curriculum development and innovations in Aboriginal education. Traditional teachings from respected Elders may be incorporated into learning. For learners with a research focus, this course enables inquiry into the production of knowledge, from both western and indigenous perspectives. For those interested in education implications, the course provides a footing in the workings and characteristics of indigenous knowing which will aid their pedagogical practices in


LHA1185 H

This course provides you with opportunities to examine current principles, practices, trends and issues related to organizational leadership, and apply these concepts to your own professional practice. You will explore leadership styles, practices, tasks and models, and are encouraged to reflect on and analyze your own leadership experiences in light of theories examined.


LHA1186 H

Perspectives on Organizational Change” explores concepts, practices and processes in organizations, with specific emphasis on the challenges and strategies for addressing the human aspects of change. The course combines an experimental approach and critical analysis to examine issues in organizational change. Students will gain understanding of theories, practices and the importance of Human Resources Development, Human Resources Management and Labour Relations principles in planning and implementing effective organizational change.


LHA1188 H

This seminar provides an introductory overview of different traditions of social research relevant to adult education. It explores and compares the varied types of research questions asked and answered by different paradigms, their different founding assumptions, the tools and techniques of data collection typically used, and differing approaches to analysis and formulation of conclusions. It will explain the use and varied meanings of such familiar research terms as objectivity and subjectivity, hypotheses and other ways to formulate research questions, sampling and other methods of participant selection, assumptions and biases, and varying approaches to concepts of ‘evidence, ’ ‘validity,’ ‘reliability’ and ‘generalisability.’ The course includes guest appearances by experts and advocates for the major traditions explored. It will assist students who want to be more informed readers and users of research.


LHA1189 H

This course examines current issues and recent directions in Workplace Literacy in theory, policy and practice. It focuses in particular on understanding ‘literacies’ as multiple ways of making meaning and on ‘social practice’ approaches to exploring how the meanings of literacy are embedded in local settings. These understandings have become familiar over two decades in studies of literacy/cies in schooling, community and family settings, but have been slow to be applied in the context of workplace-based language and literacy education. This course explores the growing interest and debates over the implications of this approach for various groups of employees, employers and workplace educators. Readings for the course include Canadian and international critical literature on workplace change, changing theories of literacy, ethnographic case studies of literacies in working life, and strategies for workplace language and literacy education.


LHA1190 H

This course will examine issues faced by individuals, groups and communities trapped in ongoing cycles of violence due to historic and current traumas, and systemic injustice. The course will focus on healing and peacebuilding initiatives at the community level and will draw on diverse cultural traditions. The course will acquaint students with current theoretical concepts of community healing and peacebuilding. Participants will also develop skills, values and attitudes that will enable them to work towards healing, reconciliation, and comprehensive, viable peace. The notion of praxis is key, and students will be given the opportunity to reflect on their own practice. InterChange: International Institute for Community-Based Peacebuilding, of which the course instructor is a founder and director, will provide a useful framework for inquiry, as well as opportunities for student exchanges, research projects and practicums.


LHA1191 H

The course will help students choose a topic, organize their course selection to contribute maximally to their research interest, develop an argument, find faculty, who are experts in their field of interest, complete their ethics review, conduct and report on their research. All students must take a least one Research Methods Course during or before this course. Permission of the instructor is required for students who have not taken


LHA1192 H

Governments, business and the media commonly point to Literacy as a solution to social and economic exclusion. In this story, people can overcome exclusion by becoming more Literate, that is, by acquiring the standardized, dominant language and literacy practices used in schools, government and the media. But recent international theories of adult literacy point in another direction, emphasizing the social, economic and creative importance of the multiple ‘literacies’ people use every day to sustain their lives and communities. Drawing on these theories, variously known as social practice theories, socio-cultural theories, or "The New Literacy Studies”, this course explores how people actually use written texts, where, and with whom, and the implications of multiple literacies for building more inclusive communities.


LHA1193 H

This course will introduce students to the emerging field of adult education for sustainability. As a form of critical pedagogy, it concentrates on the interface between the education of adults and the question of sustainability. The task of adult education for sustainability involves helping us to learn our way out of unsustainable modes of thinking, feeling and acting about ourselves, our communities and the wider world, and to learn our way in to more sustainable ways of life. This course will cover issues associated with adult education for sustainability, such as globalization, sustainable development, community, environmental integrity,social justice, gender, energy and ecological literacy. It will also examine the role of adult education in exploring alternative models to our current unsustainable direction.


LHA1194 H

Drawing from a number of disciplinary perspectives, including education, sociology, social psychology and communication studies, this course provides an opportunity to interrogate the potential relationship of the Internet to adult education and community development. The main objectives of this course are: - To engage participants in an examination of the potential influence of the Internet on key adult education praxis areas such as community development, literacy and nonprofit organizations - To provide participants with a critical framework for analyzing Internet mediated environments. - To explore Internet resources that may be used in conjunction with traditional community development and adult education practice. The course is conducted using a seminar format where discussion is informed by weekly readings. The course also makes use of the Education Commons’ computer labs, so that students can become familiar with emerging technology and applications.


LHA1195 H

This course examines the shifting interface between emerging technologies, primarily information and communication technologies, and the workplace. Drawing from various disciplinary perspectives, including education, sociology, social psychology and communication studies, the course provides an opportunity for students to interrogate the ways in which technology is embedded in work processes. Students will explore the impact of technology on both for profit and nonprofit enterprises. Some topics that will be covered include issues of equality, workplace democracy, virtual teamwork, the network economy and the social economy Basic working knowledge of computer and Internet applications are required; high-speed interconnectivity is strongly recommended.


LHA1196 H

Humans are fundamentally social creatures, depending on good relationships with those around us for optimal functioning. When harm is done in these relationships people suffer. If restoration does not occur and the underlying structural and cultural issues are not addressed, suffering and violence will likely continue, whether acted out inwardly within the individual or group, or outwardly, directed to others. Reconciliation, the complex, dynamic, long-term process of restoring relationships, structures and identities after violent conflict, is a concept that is becoming increasingly relevant. This course has been developed to study reconciliation in accordance with the following principles: reconciliation is necessary; reconciliation is complex; reconciliation is praxis; and reconciliation has implications for adult education and community


LHA1197 H

Following the lead of American essayist Wendell Berry, who has argued that eating is an agricultural act, this course will focus on the idea that eating is also a pedagogical act. What do we learn, and unlearn, from the food we eat? How is the food on our plate connected to such issues as food systems, food politics, food justice, food security, food sovereignty and food movements? Can we consume our way into a more sustainable future, or does this simply reinforce our current unsustainable way of life? This course will explore these and other questions, keeping in mind that food can be a catalyst for learning, resistance and


LHA1802 Y

This course surveys different theoretical approaches to the study of higher education and knowledge construction focussing on key authors in each tradition. Different theoretical perspectives in the higher education literature include the political economic, social psychological, critical (neomarxist, feminist, anti- racist, anti-colonial), and postmodern and poststructural, as well as writing based on scientific metaphors. Students will begin to identify the often unarticulated theoretical assumptions of writing in higher education, as well as to examine how theory is used by various writers and researchers in this field. The course is intended to assist students in choosing appropriate theoretical frameworks for their thesis or project research. .


LHA1803 H

An examination of some of the many issues that have been characteristic of postsecondary education in the past and are likely to continue to be faced in the future.


LHA1804 H

This course is intended to enable students to identify and analyze major current issues in medical/health professional education and to present clear, logically coherent and empirically justified analyses of those


LHA1805 H

This course reviews the history and politics of the several categories of institutions that have borne the name "community college". Particular attention will be paid to the psychological, economic, and political assumptions that characterize the Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology in Ontario, past and present.


LHA1806 H

A comparative description and analysis of tertiary-level systems of education with special attention to their structure and governance and the relevant features of the societies in which they operate.


LHA1807 H

This course is designed to provide students with basic knowledge and skills in strategic planning as applied to college and university systems. Past and current efforts at planning for universities and community colleges at the provincial level in Ontario will be analysed and compared with counterpart activities in other jurisdictions of Canada and the United States. NOTE: This course with a systems focus complements TPS1811H, which has an institutional focus.


LHA1808 H

This course addresses educational research approaches specifically in the health professions. It involves a critical examination of appropriate literature with respect to survey, qualitative, and quantitative research methods with the objective of enabling students to propose implementable research projects. NOTE: The course is designed for students enrolled in the M.Ed. specialization in health professional


LHA1809 H

A study of the practice of management and administration in colleges and universities including: an examination of the processes of planning, organization, coordination, communication, control; decision-making practices; and the analysis of illustrative cases and present practices. The course will be organized mainly


LHA1810 H

This course is designed to acquaint health professionals with the assessment formats used to evaluate the domains of clinical competence in health care professional training at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels of training. The course will provide an introduction to the concepts of reliability and validity which are central to the analysis of the assessment methods to be discussed. Written examinations, oral formats, and Standardized Patient performance-based testing are amongst the methods that will be


LHA1811 H

A study of the practice of institutional research and strategic planning in community colleges and universities. This course is designed to examine the methodologies and the practice of institutional research and to provide students with knowledge and skills in strategic and long-range planning as applied to colleges and universities at the institutional level. NOTE: This course with an institutional focus complements TPS1807H, which has a systems focus.


LHA1812 H

This course reviews theoretical debates regarding the nature of professions and professional education, placing them within their historical context in western societies. Contemporary issues that are addressed include the implications of globalization of the professions, diversity in the professions and the "entrepreneural university" and the professions. Perspectives of practitioners as well as faculty teaching in the professions


LHA1813 H

This seminar course addresses a number of findings and theories in cognitive and educational psychology that are relevant to health professional education. Topics include theories of expert skills such as classification, problem solving, decision making, and technical expertise, as well as theories of expert development and their applications to health professional education. The course is designed around readings from the cognitive and educational psychology literature and relevant readings from the health professional education literature.


LHA1817 H

This course begins with the contemporary critique of professional education as ivory towerish, reductionist, exclusionary and monocultural and examines proposals for more practice-based, holistic, inclusionary and emancipatory approaches. Proposals for revitalizing professional education in the new millennium have emerged from a variety of theoretical orientations, including social psychological, critical, postcolonial and poststructural. In this course, we will focus on the writings of Freire, Bertell, Schon, Noddings, Nightingale, Watson, Shiva, Harding, Haraway and Smith.


LHA1819 H

This course addresses the arrangements for governance in higher education. It examines formal models and theories of governance; the legal and institutional framework of higher education governance; the role and characteristics of higher education intermediary bodies, governing boards, and academic senates and their relationships to one another; and current challenges and issues pertaining to university and community college governance.


LHA1820 H

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the role of higher education teachers as cultural workers and political change agents. Literature from a variety of social critical perspectives and standpoints will be examined including anti-racism, anti-colonialism, feminism, queer theory, social class, and ablism. We will also examine literature on Aboriginal issues in Canadian higher education, and implications for teaching. .


LHA1820 H

The inspiration to develop this course comes from the many extraordinary women of colour who have changed how we think about education and its links to communities. In particular I wanted to develop a course that brought together writings that paid attention to feminist intersectional analysis, and that worked from marxian perspectives. However, working from a marxian perspective involves also understanding poststructuralist critique, and, as a materialist thinker, how to locate and work with key poststructuralist writers and their texts. This course is oriented to creating new knowledges and new curricula in the interest of democratizing educational spaces.


LHA1820 H

Globalization has emerged as a major theme in higher education studies, forcing us to reconsider how universities, colleges and the state are being reconfigured with respect to international markets. We will be examining critical policy trajectories within this landscape, including the policies of international institutions within an emerging global financial architecture. We will consider topics such as the commodification of education, corporatization of postsecondary institutions, and the production of neocolonialisms (for example, through the race to capture international education markets in the global south, or through the production of biotechnologies that affect food production and distribution, and so on). We will examine these themes through a social justice lens that considers race, class, and gender.


LHA1820 H

A conceptual and practical introduction to the use of descriptive and inferential statistical analyses to answer research questions. Topics include correlation, regression, t-test, ANOVA, and chi-square. Students will learn how to use SPSS to create and analyze datasets, and how to report analysis results.


LHA1820 H

This course critically analyzes evidence informed practices and issues that guide and influence excellence in health professional teaching in institutions of higher education. A critical analysis incorporates a thoughtful deconstruction of a practice or an issue, a breaking down into parts so that we can better understand what makes the whole. Being critical involves carefully assessing what we have deconstructed, to identify both the strengths and the weaknesses and thus to contribute to our purpose of guiding and influencing excellence in health professional education. This course will create a learner centered environment by inviting students to participate actively with peers in a supportive ‘community of learners’, by engaging students through a balance of arts based and web based technological approaches, and by incorporating leadership roles for students within the course. The course will open by examining the literature on exceptional teachers, teaching styles, arts based teaching and learning, the teacher’s role as facilitator of student learning, learning theories, teaching philosophies, small class approaches within large classes, and diverse learners. Current issues within the health professions will be explored such as the evolution of problem based learning, the challenges of interprofessional education, health literacy, and ethical/legal concerns. Evidence informed practices that will be examined include: effective teaching/preceptoring/supervision in the health professions, assessment of student clinical performance, assigning failing clinical grades, and best practices in clinical simulations. The course will end by addressing health professional educator career development. Student assignments will offer opportunities to reflect upon and extend course learning.


LHA1820 H

Learners in this course explore the translation of evidence-based clinical practice to evidence-based teaching (EBT) practice. EBT is defined as “the conscientious, explicit, and judicious integration of best available research on teaching technique and expertise within the context of student, teacher, department, college, university, and community characteristics” (Buskist and Groccia, 2011, p. 8). EBT in higher education originated in the clinical fields of medicine, nursing, social work, health sciences and psychology. Today educators in professional education programs are seeking greater knowledge and skills to meet the challenges of today’s increasingly complex teaching and learning context. Increasingly, students need to develop and demonstrate higher order thinking skills such as critical thinking, appraisal and reflection; concurrently, many educators continue to rely on instructional strategies that instead achieve predominantly surface levels of learning. Shifting teaching practice from a traditional teaching model to a contemporary learning-centred approach is a challenge for many educators. In this course learners explore the pedagogy behind EBT and experience innovative EBT strategies to help meet that challenge and engage their students in a constructive learning process that promotes deeper learning.


LHA1820 H

This course introduces the concept of "College Choice" from both the student and institutional perspectives. The course provides a historical perspective on the development of various college choice models. It examines the factors and processes of college choice that influence the students' decision-making of an undergraduate or a graduate program. Current and emerging issues and trends related to international students' choices are explored as well. The Choice Models pertain to the various "conceptual" approaches to the choice models - econometric models, sociological models, marketing models, and push-pull models. From a process perspective, four combined student college choice models are introduced. The choice Variables discuss major factors influencing students' choice, such as (1) institutional characteristics - quality and rankings, and financial aid, (2) student characteristics, and (3) significan others. The College Choice examines the major studies on college choice of undergraduate students, graduate students, and international students (including undergraduates and graduates). For the purpose of this course, the term "college choice" is broadly used to explain students' choice of a post-secondary educational institution, be it a community college, university, or graduate program at the masters' or doctoral level.


LHA1820 H

Institutions of higher education are facing increased opportunities and challenges related to the international dimensions of higher education. Internationalization, through campus based strategies, crossborder education initiatives, and international partnerships bring diverse benefits to students, faculty, teaching/learning, research and service work of universities and colleges. But, there are potentional unintended consequences and risks as well. The purpose of this seminar course is to critically examine the process and impact of internationalization at the institutional level using a comparative and applied approach.


LHA1820 H

This seminar explores the social, cultural, political, and systemic productions of “bodies” with a specific focus on the bodies of knowledge and knowledge of bodies in the health professions. Equity and social justice lenses will be used to expose the identity politics of health issues. Poststructural, queer, postcolonial, and feminist thinkers will be used to examine the political construction of health issues that become gendered, racialized, sexualized, and classed. Various clinical, medical, and psychiatric examples will be integrated throughout the course to study the politics of health and bodies. Some examples include: body image, skin bleaching, reproductive technologies, geneticism, gender identity disorders, sexual reassignment surgeries, breast cancer mastectomies, intersexuality, sexually transmitted diseases, depression, and sexual violence. The vision of this seminar is to create new spaces for health professionals to think about the relationships amongst bodies, identities, and culture by critically examining the socio-political implications and future potentialities of body politics.


LHA1820 H

This course on the politics of higher education has three levels. First, it will explore the iterative structuring of higher education, the state and society in relations of power, governance and authority (higher education and society). Second, it will explore the role of higher education institutions as political actors within society and compare and contrast different types of institutions, the role they play and the scope that is available to them in pursuing institutional interests (higher education in society). Third, it will explore the role of actors within institutions, and how internal relations are shaped within institutions and the positioning of different kinds of actors such as trustees, administrators, faculty, staff and students (inside higher education). The course will cover contemporary key debates, such as markets and the public versus the private good; academic freedom, institutional autonomy and speaking truth to power; the relationship between universities and colleges and institutions of power; the relationship between universities and colleges and key social actors such as employers and professional bodies; the structuring of higher education and institutional and sectoral relationships to funding and regulatory bodies; the role of unions and student bodies; and internal governance, structures and power. The course will draw from political theory and from a research and experiential base.


LHA1820 H

The course is designed to introduce master's and doctoral students to issues and approaches relevant to teaching and learning in postsecondary classrooms, particularly those classrooms within research intensive institutions. Multiple perspectives will be examined on teaching and learning issues, expectations, experiences, and related outcomes.


LHA1820 H

Michel Foucault’s work is important for the health professions in many ways. Foucauldian discourse analysis is a particularly useful way for scholars to make visible the ways in which particular discourses systematically construct versions of the social world. A Foucauldian approach makes visible dominant ‘regimes of truth’ that arise from normalized and sanctioned ways of thinking, speaking, and being. Foucault’s genealogical histories explore the discursively constructed nature of clinical medicine, ethics, the body, sexuality, madness, identity, and many other topics that are pivotal to health professional education. In the course we will explore Foucault’s concept of discourse, examine Foucault’s own discourse analyses/genealogical studies, read critiques of his approach written by scholars with various perspectives, meet researchers currently working with a Foucauldian approach, and learn to use discourse analysis as a research method.


LHA1820 H

This special topics course will examine the evolution and current directions of public policy for academic research in Canada and internationally. The course will be designed for students in the higher education program, but will be open to students from other programs with substantive interests in research policy issues. Throughout the semester students will gain an in-depth understanding of the ideas, institutions, and policy dynamics shaping academic research, and will develop invaluable skills for policy analysis in this area. This will be achieved through scholarly and policy readings, and research conducted in teams as part of a major analytical assignment following a problem-based approach.


LHA1820 H

This course will use a feminist-antiracist decolonizing lens to examine higher education and its historical connection with the industrial military complex and the non-profit industrial complex. We will examine the corporate ideology within which higher education became organized through the relations of war entrepreneurship, and the project of nation building early in the 20th century, and during the Cold War era. Finally we will examine the role of higher education in our current era of neoliberal economic policies and knowledge capitalism vis a vis the political economy of wars on terror, the production of social conflict, the shock doctrine, biocapitalism and globalized cultures of surveillance. The course will provide space to address questions of critical pedagogy and resistance in curriculum building and scholarship.


LHA1820 H

This course is intended to provide knowledge, skills and experiences to prepare students to direct, design, conduct, assess and evaluate interview-based research. A basic knowledge of qualitative methods obtained through an introductory course is desirable, as this course assumes and understanding of the principles and epistemological foundations of qualitative research. A range of methodological and disciplinary traditions in interview-based research will be examined, including such diverse approaches as oral history, large-scale survey interviewing, ethnographic interviewing, and elite interviewing among others. Different formats and techniques of face-to-face and remote interviewing will be discussed, involving individuals and groups. Considerations related to carrying out and managing team-based studies in academic and policy research settings will be debated. Students will also explore the use of various traditional and emerging information and communication technologies in the interview research process, from data collection to the presentatiion of results. The integration of interview data into digital formats of storage, curation and dissemination will be explored. In addition to seminar-style discussion of assigned readings, students will carry out a research project during the course to engage in, reflect on, and learn from real-life practice. Students at or near the thesis stage will be encouraged to consult with the instructor in advance to discuss the option of integrating their intended projects into the course activities.


LHA1820 H

This course will consist of a survey of the application of simulation in the health professions, with an emphasis on high-fidelity simulation.


LHA1820 H

This course examines the political and cultural production of science and technology, with an emphasis on feminist and anti-racist questioning of epistemologies, methodologies, and the role of power and imperialism in the legitimation of academic knowledges. We will discuss scientific imperialism as an aspect of market relations in the 21st century, and explore its link to global racism and militarism.


LHA1820 H

This course will begin with an examination of the early years of Ontario universities, and will trace their rise with an eye on their development as public institutions, and the very Canadian - and perhaps even the Ontario-specific-notion of 'public'. The course will examine changing patterns of finance (government funding, tuition fees) and other policy areas with respect to universities, guided by the question of whether or not our notions of 'publicness' are again being challenged and transformed. The course will begin with a look at 19th century ideas of the purpose and nature of higher education.


LHA1820 H

This course will provide students who have some prior knowledge of research methods advanced training on case study methods. It is recommended for graduate students who plan to carry out case studies during their thesis research and beyond, and who are ready to engage in a theory-based, hands on approach to learning.


LHA1820 H

A stated goal of the student affairs profession is to maximize student learning through the facilitation of the many aspects of personal and interpersonal development. To accomplish this goal, student affairs professionals must have a clear understanding of the developmental issues facing students throughout their lifetimes and the process by which development occurs. They must also be aware of factors that affect development and be able to work with individuals, groups, and organizations within the diverse campus community to establish environments conducive to the development of students from a variety of backgrounds. Knowledge of theories of human development and their application in college settings will assist student affairs professionals in accomplishing these goals. This course will focus specifically on the following aspects of identity development: spiritual; racial/ethnic; sexual orientation; gender; and developmental issues of disabled individuals and in the ways that these students' needs are met by the institution.


LHA1820 H

Popular movies, advertisements, television programs, plays and other media venues have portrayed students and their experiences n higher education in various ways. Many of these ways are humorous distortions of students’ experiences and the educational environments in which they learn and develop. Prospective postsecondary education students can be influenced by the messages being sent about the student experience in colleges and universities and may find their real experience in postsecondary education to be misaligned with their expectations. This class will critically examine the messages presented by popular media regarding the students and their experiences in postsecondary education. Student development theories and critical media studies frameworks will be used to guide the examinations in this course.


LHA1820 H

This seminar examines what is happening inside the academy in relation to what is happening outside the “ivory tower.” Various social, cultural, political, and institutional aspects of higher education will be explored in order to consider what it might mean to democratize the academy. Citizenship discourse marks the core of the course where we consider the circulation of bodies in relation to capitalism, globalization, neoliberalism, and neocolonialism. Space and time function as critical points of interest throughout the course where specific attention is placed on conceptualizing and rethinking agency as a central element of democratizing


LHA1820 H

The course will be conducted as a seminar that will address a series of problems and issues in Health Professions Education Development. These include: relationships between education and research, ways and means of funding health research, scientific communication, research methods, issues regarding the use of


LHA1820 H

This seminar critically explores the relationship between theory and practice in educational contexts. Poststructuralist accounts run throughout the seminar and specific attention is given to queer, postcolonial, and feminist pedagogies. A politics of identity is central to the course where we consider the various ways in which race, gender, sex, ability, sexuality, and class circulate in educational spaces. The vision of the course is threefold: expose current inequities in educational theories and practices; use a social justice framework to rework curriculum, teaching, and learning practices; and develop creative ways for thinking about critical pedagogies.


LHA1820 H

This course begins by providing an overall framework to understand equity practices in education. Here, we review definitions and terms, gain an overview of the larger context of social, political and economic changes in which attempts at equity are situated, and look at power issues that permeate all educational settings. We then look at selected writings on efforts to transform existing classroom practices and educational research. Rather than treating them as perfect models, we treat them as exemplars from which we may borrow in working toward new formulations of educational and societal equity. .


LHA1820 H

Research in health professions education is evolving an increasing focus on sociological issues such as the nature of ‘professionalism’, the politics of performance evaluation, and the characteristics of team communication. This course examines how theoretical frameworks from the social sciences can be fruitfully brought to bear on research questions in this field using the perspectives of three key theorists whose work has relevance to the exploration of sociological questions in health professions education research: Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, and Kenneth Burke. The course will devote three weeks to each theorist, with one introductory class and two summary classes. Students will be required to write their final paper exploring the construct(s) of one of the three theorists.


LHA1820 H

This course will provide an opportunity to students to examine and reflect upon the complexity and dynamics of policy formulation, implementation, and institutional change. They will develop an understanding of the manner in which policy and reform objectives are received by the implementation agents at various levels; how the top-down guidelines are inevitably transformed by responses of the agents of change; and how processes of interpretation, negotiation, conflict, power politics, and compromise come into play in determining outcomes, intended and unintended. The course will entail examining these dynamics at different levels, progressively moving from the wider socio-political, cultural, and governance contexts within which policy is being formulated and institutional change envisaged, to the institutional responses to policy regimes, and down to the manner in which heads of departments and ‘street level’ agents manage and navigate the


LHA1820 H

The research university is now a global model, a highly influential template for organizing education and research activities in contemporary societies. Research universities are complex organizations, sprawling conglomerates that harbor multiple (and often competing) ideals, missions, activities, and variegated academic communities. This seminar examines major lines of inquiry on the research university in cross-national perspective, with a focus on the North American landscape. Students are expected to engage with conceptual and empirical studies from a variety of disciplines that contribute to an increased understanding of change and continuity in the research university.


LHA1820 H

It has been argued that while much is known about research, teaching and governance in postsecondary education, little is known about the faculty who people these institutions. This course begins by examining issues of power visible in faculty careers with a particular focus on equity. Some of the topics that will be examined are labour relations, faculty-student relations, collegial arrangements, academic freedon, involvement in governance, knowledge production (research, publication, curriculum) and teaching and worload. The role of the intellectual from various theoretical perspectives will also be considered.


LHA1820 H

Within the health professions, the term "clinical educator" designates the role of those who become teachers within a context of clinical practice. This course provides a critical examination of the historical construction of the "clinical educator" through the discourse of medicine, and the ideology of western science. This discussion will then serve as a backdrop for introducing other perspectives on healing taught by experienced and respected practitioners working outside mainstream medicine. Using anticolonial methodology, students will have an opportunity to critically explore and develop their own understandings of what it means to be a "healing teacher" within a framework of equity, social concern, and spiritual/moral understanding.


LHA1820 H

In this course the role of Western Knowledge Systems that is promoting and perpetuating the marginalization of Women and non-Western people is critically examined and resistance to such marginalization from those marginalized within and outside the Academy is documented. Such examination is urgent in a context where capitalist patriarchy is becoming entrenched and the academy itself is gradually becoming corporatized, while at the same time, vibrant discussions around the globe are articulating alternatives to the neo-liberal paradigm.


LHA1820 H

A course that will examine in depth a topic of particular relevance not already covered in regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session OISE/UT course schedules.


LHA1820 H




LHA1820 H

Universities participate in numerous international exchanges and projects. This course will address the question whether a fundamental framework of ethics can be found which is responsive to this situation and whether human rights can serve as a guide in this context. At issue also is the question whether the universities (and where) can respond to some of the major troubling issues of our times, such as extreme poverty, the systematic exploitation of various groups and massive human rights violations.


LHA1820 H

This course will examine the process of facilitating the changing of paradigms in curriculum perspectives within higher education. Issues will be explored in light of different philosophic perspectives, theory and research reflected in the literature on leadership and change, paradigm shifts and curriculum planning, as well as from the perspectives and actual experiences of faculty, administrative/governance personnel, and faculty association/union leaders.


LHA1820 H

The course focuses on the professional and career development of the health professional teacher/educator in institutions of higher education: the nature of academic health science centres; motivations and job activities of health professionals; mentoring in the health professions; evaluations of teachers and teaching and the use of these evaluations for faculty development, promotion and compensation; faculty and instructional development programs for health professional teachers; the hierarchy and promotions within an academic health science centre; barriers to promotions of minorities; inter-professional relationships in the health professions. The purposes of the course are two-fold: (1) to help the participant in his/her own career development; (2) to help the participant develop some knowledge, skills and expertise to assist with professional and faculty development programs in his/her own institution. .


LHA1820 H

Philosophies and practices associated with interpretive approaches (e.g. hermenentics, semiotics, discourse analysis, etc.) and inductive approaches (e.g., ethnography, participant-observation, etc.) will be examined in terms of how these can complement each other. In addition to empirical approaches, students will explore the role that historical, philosophical, critical, and aesthetic inquiry can play in higher education research.


LHA1820 H

This course details the process of policy making as it affects higher education. A case study approach is used to illustrate the manner in which institutions and governments develop and implement new policies.


LHA1820 H

The purpose of this course is to provide a theoretical framework for community college leaders to examine exemplary leadership programs and practices in post-secondary education, review the relevant leadership literature, and engage in action research. The course is designed to enable students to both study and develop necessary knowledge and skills to be an effective community college leader in the changing college environment.


LHA1820 H

This course is a “blended learning” service-learning course. Blended learning refers to the course format in which students will meet periodically face-to-face with the instructor as well as engage through the institutional Blackboard interface to submit assignments, contribute to discussion forums, etc. Students will meet face-to-face three times during the term: in Week 1 to set the context for their service learning experience and the expectations; in Week 5 to discuss what they have learned thus far within their placement site and how it connects to course concepts introduced in TPS1803H; and in Week 12. “Service learning” refers to the expectation for students to complete 30 hours at their placement site. A number of educational organizations from around the GTA have indicated their interested in serving as community partners for this experience. Students will have had to complete TPS1803H as a course pre-requisite as the proposed course is structured on students’ reflecting on and applying the concepts discussed within “Recurring Issues in Postsecondary Education” (TPS1803H) within the context of contributing to the development, delivery, or assessment of programs/services of their service learning placement site. Students will develop a learning contract with their service learning placement site supervisor, submit 4 critical reflection papers in which they connect concepts from TPS1803H to their experience at their service learning site, comment on the reflection papers submitted by classmates, and create an electronic portfolio to demonstrate their learning.


LHA1821 H

This course will examine the nature of institutional differentiation in postsecondary education, theories which have been advanced to explain observed trends and patterns in institutional differentiation, and policy implications. Particular attention will be given to the following distinctions: degree and non-degree; public and private; comprehensive and special mission; education sector and non-education sector; traditional and nontraditional; and teaching centered and learning centered. The course will look also at comparative study of institutions as an analytical tool in the study of postsecondary education.


LHA1825 H

This course provides an overview of the evolution of comparative education as a field of study, covering historical-philosophical, positivistic, phenomenological and neo-Marxist approaches to the field. It also looks at how comparative education scholars have responded to the literature of postmodernism and globalization. Central themes of the course are the purpose of comparative education, the impact of diverse views of social change, and the idea of scientific method. The role of such international organizations as the International Bureau of Education, UNESCO, and the World Bank in comparative education is discussed.


LHA1826 H

This course provides an overview of the field of comparative higher education, beginning with perspectives from the different civilizations which fostered higher learning in the pre-modern era. It considers theories from comparative education and disciplines such as history, sociology and anthropology as they apply to understanding higher education in global context. It also takes both a regional and a thematic approach in looking at higher education across different societies. Themes covered in the course include gender in higher education, curricular patterns across different societies, student issues and the relation of higher education to


LHA1828 H

This course investigates the theory and practice of evaluation in higher education, including admissions processes, assessment of student learning, student evaluation of teaching, and program and institutional evaluation.


LHA1832 H

This course examines traditions of scholarship and scholarly institutions in East Asia, relating them to such major religious and philosophical perspectives as Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism and Shintoism. Modern universities and higher education systems in China and Japan are analysed comparatively, as they drew upon Western models of the university, yet also incorporated aspects of their own traditions. Comparison with the higher education of other East Asian societies will also be encouraged. The course will enable students to grasp the main lines of difference between higher education in East Asia and the West, as well as differentiate some of the threads that have contributed to diversity within the region. .


LHA1833 H

Over the past twenty years research universities across many international jurisdictions have become increasingly entrepreneurial and aggressive in their pursuit of corporate relationships. This trend must be contextualized in terms of regional restructuring of higher education systems in an era of economic globalization. There is now abundant evidence that this trend influences many aspects of the university, including curricula, research, governance, and policy. In this course, students will be involved in critically examining the implications of academic capitalism, especially in terms of equity, human rights, and world


LHA1834 H

This course is designed for students who are planning, collecting data, analyzing or writing up thesis or other qualitative research. Classes will involve reading about the theoretical paradigms (e.g. interactionish, phenomenological, critical feminist, postcolonial/emancipatory) and research methodologies and types of analysis and interpretations being used by students (e.g. participant observation, thematic analysis, focus groups, individual interviews, ethnography, autoethnography, grounded theory, critical ethnography, participatory action research, life histories/narratives, institutional ethnography, textual analysis, policy or program analysis). Selected ethical issues that are often encountered in the process of doing research will also be covered. Special attention will be paid to analysis and interpretation of the data, with students presenting their changing views of their chosen topic at each session for feedback and referral to relevant


LHA1836 H

This course will focus on the critical analysis of interdisciplinary research conducted within the higher education context. Participants will begin with an exploration of the fundamental characteristics and underlying theories of quantitative, qualitative and mixed mode research methodologies, and the strengths and limitations of each in relation to issues relevant to higher education. Building on this foundation, the participants will analyze and critique publications and theses reporting higher education research. Recommendations and implications suggested in these documents will be critiqued with respect to their potential impact on decisions made by organizational leaders with respect to equity issues, policies and procedures. Finally, participants will develop a sound research proposal that could conceivably be conducted


LHA1837 H

In this course, environmental health is framed as a field of research, education, policy and advocacy endeavours that links the natural, health and social sciences with the worlds of the academy, community, business, economics, labour, governments and media. It includes physical, social, cultural, spiritual and societal relationships which are multidirectional and interlinked with the health and well being of all life. In the context of transformative higher education, the course will help students to develop critical thinking, investigative, analytical and practical skills to better understand the constraints of scientific certainty and uncertainty in today's complex world in order to address lifestyle as well as public policy changes. The issues are framed within the broad socioenvironmental perspectives on health promotion reflected in the goals of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion - strengthening community action, developing personal skills, creating supportive environments, helping in skills development to educate, enable, mediate and advocate. Readings will include selected works by Steingraber, Colborn, Hancock, Chu, Bertell, Davis, CELA/OCFPEHC, IJC, Van Esterik and Health Canada. .


LHA1843 H

This course will examine the legal framework of higher education, including laws, regulations, and judicial interpretations that impact upon the governance and conduct of higher education. Particular attention will be placed upon the tension between academic autonomy and individual rights as they affect students' rights, faculty status, sanctions against discrimination, and the conditions attached to government funding.


LHA1844 H

This course will explore the theoretical and conceptual foundations of the student experience in postsecondary education. As well, we will study the nature of work in postsecondary education that supports students’ development and learning. Students in this course will review and discuss broad forms of literature/documentation that addresses various components of the student experience. A particular focus of this course will be on exploring the various outcomes of postsecondary education and examining forms of assessing the various student outcomes in and beyond postsecondary education. .


LHA1845 H

This course will provide students an opportunity to apply knowledge, reflections and skills developed in the Student Experience in Postsecondary Education course, "The Student Experience in Postsecondary Education", and their experiences working in areas related to student development and learning. Students will be required to construct and conduct a mini- research project; analyze data from the research project and design and lead a course module on a theory and research-to-practice aspect of student learning and development using the results from their research analyses. Portions of the course will follow the structure of Open Space Technology (Owen, 1997) which requires the co-creation of the course outline and approaches


LHA1846 H

The purpose of this course is to examine the complex phenomenon of internationalization from both conceptual and applied perspectives,. The course explores and develops a conceptual framework for internationalization through a rigorous analysis of different meanings of the concept; shifting rationales, benefits, risks, and outcomes; and the diversity of actors and stakeholders; Students will apply the conceptual framework to a region or group of countries in the world, by analyzing the key priorities, policies and issues. Comparing different approaches among the regions and countries will raise important questions about the different roles and implications of the internationalization process. Emerging trends and issues linked to internationalization including commercialization, brain drain/gain, quality assurance, cultural homogenization, neo-colonization and world rankings will be examined. This course has a definite policy orientation and students with some academic or professional background in higher education will benefit most from it.


LHA1847 H

This course will explore and discuss models of and approaches to leadership as they pertain to higher education. Particular attention will be paid to equity and diversity issues within human resources, recognizing the increasing diversity of the higher education environment. The course will include an examination of (a) how equity and diversity inform our models of academic and administrative leadership; (b) what leaders might do to ensure that their institutions are viewed as Employers of Choice both nationally and internationally; (c) the role of leadership within the post secondary system in the promotion and enhancement of student learning and development.


LHA1848 H

This course explores how educators in higher education and professional programs approach curriculum development from an innovative perspective. Curriculum theories, philosophic perspectives in the literature, and current realities in the classroom will be explored. Curriculum challenges with respect to access, quality and funding in higher education will be identified and analyzed, and innovative strategies for addressing these challenges will be generated.


LHA1850 H

This course is designed to help graduate students learn the fundamental concepts of quantitative research design. Students will evaluate research presented in the popular press and in scholarly journals. In addition to becoming a savvy consumer of research, students will learn the lements of a quantitative research study including: framing a research question, reviewing relevant literature, insuring internal and external validity, data analysis, presentation of results, and the ethical standards of conducting research.


LHA1851 H

This course uses the concept of total survey error as a framework to discuss the survey elements relative to representation and measurement. These include appropriate sampling frames, various sample design strategies, data collection, the role of the interviewer, non-response and bias, the effect of question structure, wording and context, respondent behavior, post-survey processing, and estimation in surveys. This course requires students to have completed TPS1820H, TPS1003, or similar quantitative research courses prior to


LHA1852 H

Individual Reading and Research courses are taken as specialized study, under the direction of a staff member, focusing on topics of particular interest to the student that are not included in available courses. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be closely related to a thesis topic.


LHA1853 H

This course will discuss the philosophical foundations, administrative and organizational structures, ethical principles, and core competencies of the student affairs profession. Students will develop and articulate a working philosophy for building relationships and working effectively with students and others within the academic community. Students will also develop a professional competency development plan.


LHA1854 H

This course will examine the origins, present status, challenges and future directions of student development within the context of higher education in western society. Sessions will focus on dimensions of student diversity, the role of institutional structure and function in facilitating student development and pathways to student success and retention. In addition, the social, psychological and cultural foundations of the student personnel movement as well as the role and functions of student services staff will be examined.


LHA1855 H

This course will provide students in the Student Development and Student Services in Postsecondary Education field in the Higher Education M.Ed. to review and apply the lessons from courses taken in their Master’s degree program and in the their required core courses in their designated field. The course will be presented as a seminar with extensive readings and discussions, faculty and guest presentations, student projects and a culminating project that demonstrates student ability to apply their cumulated knowledge of the field to an existing organizational challenge.


LHA2006 H

The course is about the resources -- public and private -- that support schools, colleges, and universities: how the resources are raised, how they are allocated, how they are budgeted for, how they are economically justified, and how they are accounted for. The course is also about the connections: connections between investments in education and the larger economy, between the organization of systems and the way funding is allocated and accounted for, between forms of budgets and the efficiency with which funding is deployed, and between funding and educational quality. Although the ideas of classical economists – Smith, Ricardo, Marx, Becker, Rostow – about the formation of human capital will be discussed, the course does not require a background in economic theory. STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN TPS1017 or TPS1841 ARE NOT ELIGIBLE TO TAKE THIS COURSE FOR CREDIT.


LHA3022 H

This course is intended to place the norms, values, and practices of school life within an administrative context. The focus is on factors that promote or inhibit the development of community and the achievement of educational purposes. Students are invited to explore and apply a variety of interpretive frameworks to their understanding of institutional culture.


LHA3025 H

This doctoral level course examines theories and frameworks which accommodate the influence of values, both personal and professional, on educational leadership practices. The primary focus is on values manifested by individuals and their impact on administrative problem solving processes. Value conflicts are explored particularly as they occur when the values of individuals clash with the broader social, collective or meta values associated with organizations.


LHA3029 H

School, Parents and Community Relations are important contributors to school effectiveness and improvement. This course will explore the different types of relations and partnerships which are conducive to common educational goals and to the establishment of a true learning community. Special emphasis will focuson policies, plans and projects which support and facilitate the induction of stakeholders in the delivery of educational services and support activities


LHA3029 H

This course examines historical and contemporary research on the role of the school district in educational change. The district role is considered as a source of change, as mediating the implementation of changes mandated by external governments (provincial/state, national), and as a support for changes initiated at the school level. The role of districts in mobilizing and enabling improvement-focused change in schools is understood as variable (i.e., not all districts approach change in the same ways) and as evolving in response to changes in educational policy contexts over time. The concept of "district" is extended to include independent education systems that serve multiple schools beyond the public sector (e.g., school systems run by non-governmental and community-based organizations). The course also reviews methodological approaches and challenges in studying the district role.


LHA3029 H

This course will examine the ways large cities have attempted to improve their educational systems. It will involve reading studies of school reform in Toronto, Chicago, New York, London, and other cities, as well as engaging in conversations with school reformers. The course draws from the analysis in Gaskell and Levin's book, Making a Difference in Urban Schools: Ideas, Politics and Pedagogy (University of Toronto Press, 2012). Students will be expected to choose a city and explore its school reform efforts over time.


LHA3029 H

This special topics course is designed to assist doctoral students in the development of effective research proposals. Course readings, assignments, and activities will provide students with a structured approach to problem definition, succinctly reviewing the relevant literature, articulating conceptual frameworks, identifying suitable methodological approaches for the questions to be examined, understanding the purposes of informed consent in research design, and anticipating the timelines associated with data collection, data analysis, and writing up final reports. Students will practice writing both short proposals for graduate research funding as well as longer dissertation proposals.


LHA3029 H

This course explores professional learning communities including their conceptual basis in organizational, professional development, professional relationships and educational policy. The class will consider the opportunities and constraints of this reform strategy in general and in terms of particular practical examples.


LHA3029 H

This course will critically engage students in understanding and examining the theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of critical-radical traditions in policy studies in education. True to the interdisciplinary nature of policy study, this course will draw on work from philosophy, history, and sociology of education with a special focus on radical discourses/pedagogies (including, critical pedagogy, feminist pedagogy, critical race theory, integrative anti-racism, anti-colonialism, and post-structuralism). Following from recent interest in studying education from K-16, the course willexamine issues in primary, secondary, and post-secondary education.


LHA3029 H

This course is designed to acquaint students with the theories, practices and issues associated with leadership, policy and social justice in educational organizations. Students will have the opportunity to critically analyze and appraise the various approaches to policy, leadership and social justice. They will also have the chance to probe and clarify their own conceptions of, and attitudes toward social justice and leadership/policy in ways that will assist them with their own administrative and pedagogical practices. The course will focus on selected aspects of educational leadership, policy and social justice. Subjects to be explored include, among others, ideas of social justice and democracy, critical theories of education, leadership and policy, educational administration and social justice, the nature of leadership and policy, democratic leadership and policy, inclusive leadership and policy, various approaches to leadership, policy and social justice, and issues that


LHA3029 H




LHA3029 H

This one-time only seminar provides students with an exposure to current international trends in educational policy. Researchers world-wide, a sizeable proportion of them from OISE/UT, have contributed chapters for a forthcoming international handbook on educational policy. Seminar sessions will focus on large-scale reform, governance and leadership, literacies and learning, workplace learning, and teaching quality. Each of these sessions will take a broad and critical interdisciplinary examination of the issues, and will consider how they play out in practice in different contexts, their evolution, and recommendations for future directions. The course will allow students to gain a sense of policy and research trends in these fields, to participate in the critiquing and editing process of the handbook, and to understand policy-making and research processes more


LHA3029 H

The purpose of this course is to provide OISE/UT doctoral students with a review of some of the fundamental ideas, texts, and debates that underlie the politics of education in Canada. During this seminar, students will develop the analytical skills necessary to describe, critique, and act upon the political dilemmas central to their professional practice. The course is organized around the examination of questions and dilemmas with political implications. For example: who has the authority and power to make decisions that have an impact on educational organizations? Where does that power originate? What are some of the persistent political fights in education, and what explains who wins and why? Student learning will be assessed through the following assignments: preparation for class discussion (20%); a library assignment (15%); a book review and presentation (25%); and a presentation of course readings with group involvement


LHA3029 H

The course will focus on selected aspects of educational leadership and social justice. Subjects to be explored include, among others, ideas of social justice and democracy, critical theories of education and leadership, the nature of leadership, democratic leadership, leadership and issues of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation, feminist approaches to leadership, leadership in aboriginal contexts, barriers to practicing leadership for social justice, and globalization and leadership.


LHA3029 H

This course is about the links between research, policy, and practice in education, with some attention as well to other fields. It examines the reasons for trying to connect research more firmly to policy and practice, the nature of these links, the barriers to their being stronger, and possible actions to improve this area. The course draws heavily from work of the 'Research Supporting Practice' team at OISE, as well as related work done around the world.


LHA3029 H

This course provides an examination of several related topics of current interest in the field of educational administration, including the politics of education, policy issues related to school reform and building capacity for personal and organizational change.


LHA3029 H

Assessment and evaluation are central to educational reform initiatives all over the world. Countries, provinces and states are relying increasingly on large-scale assessments, community surveys, success indicators, etc. as measures of the progress and success of their initiatives. The disturbing paradox in this increased reliance on data for educational decision-making is one that was identified by Stiggins (1991) as assessment illiteracy and later extended to statistical illiteracy (Earl, 1995). Very simply, we live in a world with increasing reliance on statistical data from a whole range of sources, even though most people are not able to judge their adequacy or use them wisely. This course will examine the literature about using performance data for accountability and improvement in schools and districts and look at both practical and theoretical issues related to understanding what the data mean, using it for school and district planning, and communicating the messages to parents and the public. .


LHA3029 H

This is an advanced applied statistics course designed for doctoral or advanced master's students and serving as a comprehensive introduction to multi-level modeling, also known as "hierarchical linear modeling (HLM)" or "mixed effects modeling." These powerful models have become very common in educational research, both for the analysis of data with a multi-level structure (eg. students nested in schools, school boards, provinces or countries) and for the study of educational change (eg. student learning/growth, school improvement or organizational change). The course covers two-level and three-level cross-sectional and growth curve models, as well as model selection, assumptions and diagnostics. Examples and assignments will draw on data from large-scale national and international datasets; the course will also serve as an introduction to the HLM7 software package. The objective of the course is to equip students with the skills to use, interpret and write about multi-level models in their own research.


LHA3029 H

This course permits the study of specific topics or areas in educational administration not already covered in the courses listed for the current year. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session timetables.


LHA3030 H

Understanding education law is essential to the effective management and operation of schools. Schools function in a complex legal environment. It is essential for educators to be as current as possible of their legal rights and responsibilities. Focus on current issues, legislative and common law precedents.


LHA3037 H

In this seminar, concepts of strategic planning will be explored in terms of processes, issues, and applications in the educational system. The role of strategic planning will be examined in terms of the organization's mission, its stakeholders, and its environment.


LHA3040 H

A review of major perspectives on the individual and the organization includes discussion of questions pertaining to the nature of society and the nature of people. Of immediate concern is the manner in which decisions and organizational outcomes are produced, as well as the bearing that these sets of arrangements have upon productivity and the well-being of those whose lives are touched by organized education. Of express concern is the manner in which power is exercised in everyday situations that may involve elected officials, appointed administrators, teachers, students, and the public at large.


LHA3041 H

This seminar examines significant policy issues in education, both historical and current, both Canadian and international. Emphasis is on acquiring an understanding of the content and significance of the policies, with a secondary interest in policy analysis and development. Various faculty in the Department of Educational Administration will be responsible for particular sessions. NOTE: Required for Ed.D. students. An elective suitable for Ph.D. students. Permission of course coordinator required for students outside Educational Administration.


LHA3042 H

The course explores naturalistic and ethnographic methods of research applied to field research and case studies in educational administration. The researcher as participant in as well as an observer of social reality; the relationship of fact and value in social research, the limits of science in truth-making; the relationship of such science-established truth to evaluation and administrative action; and the problems of ethical inquiry into organizational and administrative realities.


LHA3043 H

An exploration of the history and current use of survey research in educational administration. Topics will include an assessment of the strengths and limitations of the method survey, the selection of samples, questionnaire design, standard measurement instruments used in the field, methods of data analysis (with a focus on using SPSS), the drawing of causal inferences, and presentation of results in a clear and effective manner.


LHA3044 H

An advanced administrative experience, primarily for Ed.D. students, under the joint guidance of faculty members and senior administrators in the internship/practicum location. Placement and responsibilities relating to the internship/practicum are determined on an individual basis depending on the needs, interests, and aspirations of students and on the availability of appropriate locations.


LHA3045 H

This course provides a working understanding of the political processes of policy formation, implementation and consequences, as well as program evaluation processes and methods, interpretation, and utilization, emphasizing their role in educational practice and using specific educational issues, activities and actors to illustrate more broadly applicable concepts. The major project for the course will involve students' development of a piece of policy analysis or a program evaluation plan.


LHA3046 H

This course examines gender issues and uses gender as a conceptual lens to explore policies, practices, relationships, and experiences in schools and other educational settings, with particular attention to implications for administration. Besides covering a broad range of educational issues and perspectives, this course focuses on gender rather broadly, considering the experiences of males as well as females, the impact of heterosexism on children and adults, and relationships between gender and other social characteristics such as race and ethnicity. Students are encouraged to bring in topics of particular interest and to use the course to explore practical problems and issues.


LHA3047 H

The course explores a variety of initiatives being taken to improve, reform, and/or restructure schools. The basic intents of these initiatives are examined in an effort to understand implications for productive change processes at the classroom, school, and school system levels. Emphasis is given to the role of leadership in fostering educational change. Students will be involved in a research project designed to illustrate the practical meaning of course concepts and to refine their research capacities.


LHA3052 H

Description as for 1052H.


LHA3055 H

An examination and application of democratic values to issues of student engagement and leadership. The course will explore the relationship between student engagement and critical-democratic leadership, and the implications that arise for educational administration and curriculum from the nature of this relationship. This course should be of interest to both teachers and administrators. .


LHA3102 H

This seminar is designed for first or second year doctoral students. It will explore key elements of the doctoral studies journey: crafting a researchable topic, developing a thesis proposal, choosing a committee, planning for comprehensives, fostering effective writing strategies, planning for publication. Required activities will include one final piece of writing related to proposal development.


LHA3103 H

This course deals with issues around globalization, sustainable ecological development, social issues at both a global and local level dealing with diversities and social power. The course will also deal with North-South tensions in knowledge production and legitimization. There is also a concern to look at our present history from a planetary perspective that embraces post-colonial development issues, and feminism in the global context. There will be an emphasis on exploring and identifying teaching perspectives dealing with the thematic issues of the course. Suggested background: Courses AEC1146, AEC1160, AEC3104.


LHA3104 H

This course will examine adult education in global contexts with specific focus on "Third World" societies. It will offer a critical review of the relationship between adult education, modes of production, and state. In this course we will draw on Marxist, feminist, anti-racist, and ecological theoretical debates. Applying critical comparative analysis, the course will examine the role of adult education in liberation movements and democratization of state and society. We will study the role of adult education in building a dynamic civil society and challenges we are facing towards creating a democratic civil society.


LHA3119 H

The course provides an opportunity for students to study globally aware women's theory and practice in community development and community transformation. It examines the general principles of this practice, the major challenges faced by activists in Canada and abroad, the growing regional and international women's networks supporting this practice, and current debates among women locally and within these networks.


LHA3131 H

This course continues the explorations undertaken in AEC1181 (Embodied Learning and Qi Gong) in three ways: (1) deepens students' understanding Qi Gong theory and practice; (2) examines how embodied learning can be applied to different contexts with an emphasis on adult learning in professional and community settings; and (3) provides space for students to develop their own applications in their own settings.


LHA3131 H

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to critically examine some of the many ways Aboriginal communities address the learning needs of their members. Areas covered will include but not be limited to: Aboriginal health science research, education policy, oral histories, the arts, story telling, approaches to adult literacy, and Aboriginal mental health and learning. Other components of the course will include Aboriginal worldviews; contemporary history/politics relevant to Aboriginal peoples; and culture-based approaches to adult education.


LHA3131 H

In recent decades, adult educators have been responding to the theoretical challenges from feminism, anti- racism, environmentalism, anti-globalization movements, post-colonial and cultural studies. This course will: 1) examine and assess divergent critical and post-structural approaches to the central issues of power, identity, values and vision which social activists and movements are raising; 2) critique the 'post' positions' implications for adult education and other engaged practice. . .


LHA3131 H

This course offers a critical framework for analyzing public policy in adult education in modern Western democratic states. It examines the relationship between state, civil society, market, and adult education policy. Focus will be on critical readings of different theoretical approaches, such as liberalism, feminism, anti-racism, Marxism, and post-colonialism, to policy research and analysis in adult education. In this course public policy is conceptualized as a social process which influences and is influenced by social relations such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability. Therefore, public policy is analysed in the context of the exercise of power by the state, the market, and non-state and non-market actors. Thus, critical policy analysis and research is not simply a study of organizational processes or governance techniques, it is also about social ideas and social goals. This is an advanced (doctoral) level course. Theoretical knowledge in the areas of anti-racism, feminism, diversity, equity, policy making, the dynamics of state/market, and adult learnings will be an asset. In discussing diverse theoretical claims, the course pays close attention to methodological underpinning of theories. It draws on a rich body of theoretical evidence inside and outside the field of adult education. The objective is to acquire a solid knowledge in analysing public policy in its political, ideological and cultural contexts.


LHA3131 H

Can research contribute to strong indigenous communities? This course will provide an overview of indigenous methodologies and an introduction to planning research projects that are relevant, respectful, responsible and reciprocal to indigenous people and communities. Students will engage in a dialogue on research relationships, ethics and protocols as they relate to working with indigenous peoples and


LHA3131 H

The integration of personal values is a key component in the process of change. Students will have the opportunity to explore the nature of personal values and their relationship to institutional development and transformation. Course work will include the analysis of students' practicum experiences. .


LHA3131 H

Home education, also known as home schooling and home-based learning, is an increasingly common educational method and context for elementary and secondary age students within Canada and the USA and beyond. As a phenomenon (that is, as a movement and practice) it has subtly influenced the face of public education and profoundly impacted its laws. The focus of this course is on: first, exploring the characteristics and history of the home education movement in North America; second, examining the practices and processes of parent-teachers; and third, investigating the intersection of home education and public education. The intention is to both critique and challenge the assumptions of public and home education while providing a forum for the commencement of scholarship on the topic. The expectation is for course participants to complete a project of their choosing which may include one or more of the following: a review of literature, a personal account of home education, a critical essay, a proposal for a research project or a mini (pilot) research project. .


LHA3131 H

This course will attempt to examine the revisioning of knowledge viewpoints in light of the post-modern critique of the hegemony of western thought as exemplified in the worldview of western instrumental technological rationality. In line with the critique is an examination of emergent areas such as quantum theory, cosmological perspectives as revealed in the universe story of modern science, indigeneous knowledge and post-patriarchial feminist perspectives. .


LHA3131 H

A course that will examine in depth a topic of particular relevance not already covered in regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced each spring in the Winter Session and Summer Session course schedules.


LHA3131 H

This is an advanced Master's/Doctoral level course for students specializing in organizational change with prerequisites in AEC3131 - Personal Values and Organizational Change and/or AEC3173 - Effecting Change: Creating Wellness. This is an experimental course requiring a high degree of initiative on the part of the learners. The students play a major role in curriculum development and practice leadership by discovering and engaging exemplary organization leaders in demonstrating the relationship between theory and practice. Students can choose a research or applied focus for their major paper.


LHA3131 H

This course offers students a rigorous examination of the theoretical debates in adult education by drawing on the Marxist analysis of social theory. This course has been conceived based on increasing student demand for theoretically rigorous courses based on historical materialism perspective of Marxist tradition. This interest has been manifested through a critical mass of students electing to complete reading courses in this theoretical orientation and also in the popularity of the critical reading group, which attracted 30+ students to its mailing list (2006-2008). Also, the course fulfils the student demand upon the department to expand the theoretical offerings at the doctoral level. The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with dialectical historical materialism as a mode of inquiry and analysis, to give student practice in reading original theoretical works, and to assist students in developing the skills to compare and contrast theoretical work. Students will develop this knowledge through two processes. First, they will familiarize themselves with the tradition of dialectical historical materialism developed by Marx in original works such as The German Ideology, Grundrisse, three volumes of Capital and various collected works. Examination of these readings will give special emphasis to the core theoretical categories of the critical/radical tradition of adult education such as ideology, consciousness, praxis, labor value, and accumulation. Second, students will use a working knowledge of these original texts to engage with the tradition of critical adult education that has developed from a Marxist analytic base, including critical theory (Frankfurt school & Habermas), critical pedagogy (Allman, Brookfield, Holst, Newman, Thomson, McLaren & Giroux), Freirian popular education, Gramscian theory, and political economy. Through these readings students will develop a comprehensive knowledge of the scope and depth of Marx(ist) theorizing the field of adult education, related bodies of work, and modes of inquiry. They will also develop an important understanding of some of the key debates of adult education, including human capital, revolution and reform, community organizing, and movement building. The first offering of this course will coincide with the 2nd Bi- Annual North American Historical Materialism conference in Toronto (May 2010), in order to provide students with a grounding in contemporary Marxist theorizing in education as well as the broader social sciences.


LHA3131 H

This course is designed for advanced students who wish to explore life history and narrative approaches for research or therapeutic work through a process of self study. Course work will involve class discussions of narrative writings and a major personal project. Students will undertake an indepth self-exploration through personal narrative combined with intensive imagination, art work, or meditative practice. The final report will include reflection on the personal change process experience. . .


LHA3131 H

The concept of skills is a centerpiece of the discourse of adult learning. It plays a pivotal role in policy development, program planning, instructional design, performance assessment and certification for a wide range of occupations and for a host of functions central to workplace and social participation (e.g., language and literacy, problem solving, etc.). Drawing on recent international theory and research, this course examines the many assumptions underlying this concept and its powerful role in shaping both organizational and personal experience. It also explores the growing implications of skills certifications and skills development as traded goods and services in international trade arrangements.


LHA3131 H

This course explores the theory and practice of popular education in different parts of the world (Latin America, Africa, Asia, North America), drawing examples from different popular movements including human rights, citizenship learning, participatory democracy, and struggles for self determination, workers rights, union mobilization, and international solidarity. It will highlight the works of Paulo Freire and his far ranging influence through pedagogical strategies such as popular theatre, participatory budgeting, and other forms of critical culture engagement.


LHA3131 H

This seminar examines adult education policies, programs, and practices in light of theories of social and cultural reproduction, as well as theories of social change. It provides students with an opportunity to critically analyze both the existing theories and their own assumptions. One of the goals of the seminar is to assist students with developing their theoretical framework for their thesis. Thus students will be asked to take an active role in relating social theories to their research proposoal.


LHA3131 H

This seminar examines research on/about Aboriginal Peoples. Conventional approaches to doing research on/about Aboriginal /Indigenous peoples are critiqued. The approach taken in this seminar will result in an appreciation and understanding of the importance of Aboriginal research and literature as circles of knowledge productions. This course will engage within the contexts of addressing communities of Aboriginal and Indigenous transformation in decolonizing methodologies as well as identifying research protocols/ethics in working with Aboriginal peoples and their communities. Specific topic areas include Aboriginal epistemologies and research ethics; understanding cultural, political, and spiritual protocols; and the importance of oral-literacy knowledge. Additional topics will be discussed based on student interest. Students will be encouraged to consider the impacts /benefits of research on/about Aboriginal /Indigenous Peoples. .


LHA3131 H

This course is a systematic reading of the major works by black feminist scholar and pedagogue, Bell Hooks. While Bell Hooks' extensive publications are well read by feminist and black scholars and students, they are not usually examined from the perspective of adult education. Through the lens of transformative learning, a sub-field in adult education, this course reviews five to six of Bell Hooks' major books and examine their pedagogical implications for adult educators.


LHA3132 H

The course shall contribute to the ongoing debate on the efficacy of Truth Commissions as vehicles of transitional justice. Women bear the brunt of gross violations and yet are excluded from processes that aim to design ways of correcting these injustices; these processes are also defined using patriarchal understandings of causes of conflict and their consequences. The course shall focus on the Kenyan Truth Commission design and process to analyse opportunities that are availed for transformative justice by Truth Commissions.


LHA3132 H

The main question this course takes off from is::"How is Idle no More as an Indigenous women led movement different from past movements and how is it changing the face of Indigenous land rights today?".The Course will be taught by Wanda Nanbush, the 2013 Dame Nita Barrow visitor. Wanda is an Anishinabe-kwe (Ojibway Woman) writer, scholar, artist, curator, community animator, arts consultant and Idle No More organizer. She has been instrumental in organizing Toronto’s major round dances, teach-ins, candle light marches, concerts, water ceremonies and vigils. She was behind the "Nation to Nation Now" symposia and :Building Unity To Action" meeting.The course, will take a historical and interdisciplinary overview of Indigenous resistance and the role of women; the difference that women make in Indigenous rights movements; Indigenous feminisms and queer theory and how it relates to Sovereignty movements. Specific moments in colonial history that have had a particular impact on Indigenous women and are necessary to understanding their activism will provide a context to examine multiple fronts of current resistance including Land, Water, Education, Law, and Culture. These cases will ground theoretical discussion.


LHA3132 H

This half course will be taught once a year by the current holder of the Dame Nita Barrow Distinguished Visitor position at OISE/UT. Each visitor will call on her own particular area of interest and experience to develop a course dealing with current issues of women, development, and community transformation in a global context and from a 'majority world' perspective.


LHA3132 H

Issues of grassroots women’s struggles and global social justice will be examined through a consideration of life histories of Kenyan women activists. Women have played a key role in resistance in Kenya from Mekatalili at the onset of British occupation, to Nyanjiru in the outburst of resistance in 1922, to women’s critical role in Mau Mau in the 1950s, to Freedom Corner and democratization and good governance and human rights struggles in the 1990s, to anti-globalization struggles today. Using her own life history and other life histories she has collected as well as the lives of famous historical figures, Wahu Kaara will examine the key role of women in African colonial and post-colonial history, ‘development’ and globalization, debt, democratization and the emergence of global social justice struggles in the 21st century. Wahu Kaara is a long-time political activist and leader who brings a range of feminist analyses and alternative women- and justice-centred perspectives to her work. She ran for parliament in Kenya in 2002 and 2007 and was a delegate to the country’s Constitutional Conference, which in 2004 completed drafting a new national constitution whose deeply democratic proposals were rejected by the government. She has served as Director of the Kenyan Debt Relief Network, Chair of the Steering Committee of the East African Coalition on Economic, Social, Cultural Rights, Co-ordinator of the debt campaign of the African Women’s Economic Policy Network and Member of the Steering Committee of the World Social Forum, which was hosted in Nairobi, Kenya in January 2007.


LHA3133 H

What is hidden under and by misrepresentation, manipulation of media and outright lies, will be uncovered in a humorous, non-threatening approach in this course. Topics of the course will be led by the topics of The Inconvenient Indian as Thomas King has presented an insight into the Lived experience of most First Nations (Aboriginal, Indians) Inuit, and Metis people of the Americas. We will be guided by King's "fascinating, often hilarious, always devastatingly truthful, historical narrative" (Joseph Boyden) to better understand why the global Idle No More movement came to be. In addition, students will hear speakers, intensely related to the idleNoMore movement and some of the issues raised. Students will participate in sharing circles, discussions and speakers.


LHA3133 H

This half course will be taught once a year by a visiting Aboriginal Elder, traditional teacher or community leader. Each visitor will call on his or her particular area of interest and experience to develop a course dealing with current issues of Aboriginal community development, learning and transformation. NOTE: Course descriptions will change year to year based on the expertise and experience of the instructor.


LHA3133 H

This course will review emerging Indigenous approaches and Best Practices to community engagement. This course will begin with historical review of research dynamics within Indigenous communities. Students will be made aware of contemporary contributions of Indigenous academics to re-invent research best practices that show respect for distinct customary laws and diversity in Indigenous communities.


LHA3133 H

This course will explore the discourse of Indigenous education and how epistemological and power relationships within Western education evolved historically. The course will provide socio-political insight into the challenges, successes and lessons learned from Indigenous resistance to colonial education. This course will provide a foundation for how Indigenous oral stories applied in the classroom can benefit all students. Using a participatory approach, this course will engage learners with practical in-class activities, guest speakers and final presentations that will model the contemporary impacts of Indigenous traditional oral knowledge/stories on learning environments.


LHA3133 H

Success stories with First Nation clients/students/employees are disproportionately low. Understanding the source of the First Nation individual’s perspective and lack of motivation could launch change in the achievement rate of institutions. While intergenerational trauma in the general Canadian Aboriginal community is explored as a barrier to success, solutions don’t seem to occupy as much time, energy and resources. This course while providing clarification of the problem of intergenerational learning will concentrate more on a foundation for solutions. This course will pave the way to an understanding that reprogramming best explains the solution to the rebirth and independence of the Aboriginal individual and community.


LHA3133 H

This course serves as a critical history of 'Indian' Residential Schools that brings Indigenous self- representations into conversation with non-Indigenous histories with the express purpose of examining notions of reconciliation. If, as Shoshona Felman argues, traumas are unfinished histories and the residential school trauma is specifically about erasing cultural memory and identity then this unique unfinished history will necessarily play itself out at the level of memory, history and identity in the name of cultural revival. The films and videos of Indigenous filmmakers are a mode of self-representation that offers up counter-narratives to the current historiography and different definitions of truth. This course asks: What histories are Indigenous artists making visible and how is history itself being conceived; What are the specific knowledges offered by moving images as a mode of representing trauma compared to a strictly historiographical approach; and How can we think reconciliation from an Indigenous perspective?


LHA3140 H

This doctoral seminar is designed to familiarize the participants with the foundational texts in postcolonial study and their theoretical implications for transformative education as it applies to the workplace and the community. It is divided into two sections. Section one involves reading the major texts relevant to post- colonial relations. Section two looks at the implications of post-colonial theories for learning and change in workplaces and in communities. This involves understanding how inequalities based on gender, race, class, ability, sexuality, etc., are produced and sustained, as well as how they can be addressed and overcome.


LHA3145 H

This course, in conjunction with appropriate research methods coursework, provides doctoral students interested in policy analysis and program evaluation in education with a working understanding of the conceptual, methodological, ethical and political issues associated with these forms of research. Course topics include problem framing; use of existing research evidence; issues associated with different audiences and settings such as writing, presentation and evidence styles; policy advocacy; and working relationships with partners and clients. Visits by additional Collaborative Program-affiliated faculty from across OISE home programs will ensure that students are exposed to a range of contrasting research conventions and styles. Major assignments for the class will consist of carrying out some of the aspects of an applied


LHA3152 H

Specialized exploration, under the direction of a faculty member, of topics of particular interest to the student that are not included in existing courses. While credit is not given for a thesis topic proper, the study may be closely related to such a topic. Guidelines and forms are available from the website: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/ro/UserFiles/File/Graduate%20Registration/GradReg_ReqIndReadRsch.pdf. This course can also be designed as a field-based practicum in adult education and/or community development in an agreed setting. The course will include reflection, research, and writing on issues raised in


LHA3153 H

Specialized exploration, under the direction of a faculty member and the holder of the Dame Nita Barrow Distinguished Visitorship in areas of the Visitor’s specialized knowledge and experience. These distinguished visitor’s are eminent feminist leaders from the global and economic south with varying areas of expertise. Information about the specializations of current and past Visitors is available on the web at: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/cwse/. For more information contact A.R.Miles.


LHA3180 H

This course looks at the role of international level actors and networks in shaping domestic educational policies and producing globalized models for learning often underappreciated in the study of educational policy and change. This course reviews various theoretical approaches to the study of international relations in the field of education, considers recent efforts to study the globalization of educational policy, and then turns to the activities of a variety of organizations and networks, intergovernmental and nongovernmental, which have developed global level mandates in education. Topics include: education in the global development regime; the educational activities of the World Bank, UNESCO the OECD and the World Trade Organization; and transnational advocacy and NGO networks in education. Prerequisite: CIE1001H .


LHA3181 H

This course will provide a supportive and stimulating environment for the systematic study of the differences between critical and post-structural approaches to issues of power, diversity, solidarity, and social change. Both activist and scholarly writing will be used as we place intense academic debate in the context of feminist social movement from the 1960s to the present, including the challenges of racism, homophobia, separatism, elitism, ableism, etc. The differing implications of critical and post-structural approaches for value based research, education and activism will be explored with specific reference to diverse literatures and practices. Course themes will be chosen in consultation with students to incorporate their own research and interests. Students who wish to consider these questions with relation to education and activism in other social movements (i.e., indigenous, anti-globalization environmental, anti-racist, anti-colonial, disabilities, anti- psychiatry, etc.) are welcome to do so in their course papers.


LHA3182 H

This seminar focuses on the connections between lifelong citizenship learning and participatory democracy. We start by analyzing theoretical debates on citizenship, democracy, governance, and political participation, and the implications of these theories for the study and the practice of citizenship education, on the one hand, and of participatory democracy, on the other. Next, we review key prior research findings on citizenship learning (in formal, nonformal and informal settings), and will examine different models of citizenship education, looking at their purposes, methods, contents and impact. With this background, we identify and interpret our own experiences of lifelong and lifewide civic and political learning. In the second part of the course, we concentrate on the pedagogical dimensions of experimental designs of participatory democracy, with a focus on participatory budgeting. We analyze selected Canadian and international case studies of participatory budgeting, and discuss new experiments like legislative theatre and children’s participatory budgeting. Throughout the course, the study of lifelong learning and democratic citizenship is related to discussions about the state, the market and civil society, global-local dynamics, inequalities, power, social reproduction and social change. The course includes a variety of formats (class discussions, instructor’s lectures, videos, guest speakers, group work, and visits to community gatherings).


LHA3183 H

This course teaches institutional ethnography (IE), a powerful method of social analysis for marginalized people in our society developed by feminist sociologist, Dorothy E. Smith, Professor Emerita at OISE/UT. IE begins with people’s everyday experiences, and provides a way of exploring how ruling relations shape their experiences and practices. The course begins with the epistemology and theoretical traditions that inform IE, discusses IE’s core concepts and procedures, examines the major tools associated with IE, and provides opportunities for practice. Explorations will include, but will not be limited to, textual analysis; the overlapping relations of gender, race, class and other axes of difference in organizations; and the enactment of power in international development contexts. Pre-requisite: At least one research methods course at the masters level, or by instructor’s permission.


LHA3810 H

This course begins with the literature of international relations to set the context for an examination of higher education's role and responsibilities in an international arena. It then looks at the critical challenges to accepted views of knowledge in the university that have arisen from social theorists such as Habermas, from feminist scholarship, and from non-Western scholarship. Topics for exploration and research include the following: academic freedom in a global context; the role of universities and colleges in international development; relations between higher education institutions and international organizations; scholar/student exchanges; and human rights and higher education.


LHA3820 H

This course is intended only for the second cohort of students in the Community College Leadership Specialization in the Ed.D. in Higher Education. The goal of the course is for each student to develop a thesis proposal and to gain an understanding of how to go about producing a thesis. Students will receive feedback on draft written proposals and on group presentations.


LHA3820 H

Description as for TPS 1820H.


LHA3820 H

This course will focus on the analysis and critique of interdisciplinary research conducted within the higher education context. Participants will begin with an exploration of the philosophical frameworks and perspectives that drive research as well as the fundamental characteristics of quantitative, qualitative and mixed mode research methodologies, and the strengths and limitations of each in relation to issues relevant to higher education. Building on this foundation, the participants will analyze and critique publications and theses reporting higher education research. Recommendations and implications suggested in these documents will be critiqued with respect to their potential impact on decisions made by organizational leaders with respect to equity issues, policies and procedures


LHA3820 H

This course is intended only for the second cohort of students in the Community College Leadership Specialization in the Ed.D. in Higher Education. The literature associated with the term, Learning College, provides one of the key theoretical frameworks for examining issues related to learning in the community college and corresponding organizational changes which have been occurring in the college sector. Dr. Terry O'Banion, author of the book, A Learning College for the Twenty-first Century, is the thinker and writer whose work is most well known in this area of inquiry. The purpose of this course is to review and critique the key concepts of the Learning College, and the applications colleges are making of these concepts, institutional policies, programs, and practices, and in the way they use their personnel.


LHA3820 H

This course will explore and discuss models of and approaches to leadership as they pertain to higher education. Particular attention will be paid to equity and diversity issues within human resources, recognizing the increasing diversity of the higher education environment. The course will include an examination of (a) how equity and diversity inform our models of academic and administrative leadership; (b) what leaders might do to ensure that their institutions are viewed as Employers of Choice both nationally and internationally ; (c) the role of leadership within the post secondary system in the promotion and enhancement of student learning and development.


LHA3820 H

In this course students will work with theorists who engage the politics of knowledge in higher education. We will review poststructuralist as well materialist writers, weaving our discussions through an integrative feminist lens. We will put theory to practice by re/writing curricula addressing issues of race, class, colonialism, heteronormativity, and ablism.


LHA3820 H

This course will explore the theoretical and conceptual foundations of the student experience in postsecondary education. As well, we will study the nature of work in postsecondary education that supports students’ development and learning. Students in this course will review and discuss broad forms of literature/documentation that addresses various components of the student experience. A particular focus of this course will be on exploring the various outcomes of postsecondary education and examining forms of assessing the various student outcomes in and beyond postsecondary education.


LHA3852 H

Description as for TPS 1852H.


SES1987 H




SES2940 H

This course provides a broad introduction to the range of theoretical concepts and methods of investigation in historical materialist thought. Past and present developments in Marxist theory and international practice will be reviewed. We will explore critical assessments of Marx's method of inquiry, the dynamics of the capitalist production process, class relations and class consciousness, ideological hegemony and popular culture, contemporary Marxist theories of education, the relations of education and work, and current challenges to Marxism. Specific topics will be developed dialogically in response to participant interests, helping students to better understand the relationship of their own projects to this tradition. The course will include guest lectures from a variety of SESE faculty in order to help participants situate Marxism in relation to other forms of theory/practice.


SES2999 Y

The course is the 3rd course in a sequence of courses offered to Masters’ students enrolled in 3 OISE departments (CTL, TPS and SESE) who share an interest in urban education – the Urban Education Cohort. Completing a 10 half-course Master of Education degree, the students in the cohort began their part-time program in September 2007; they are known to each other and to Professor Dehli who is a member of the group coordinating the cohort. Within the context of this special topics course, between September 2009 and May 2010 the students will design, develop and conduct individual or group projects in urban education. The nature of the projects will vary, some will conduct projects similar to a major research paper, some will create a media project, some will prepare, introduce and evaluate a curriculum unit, while some will conduct a participatory research project in their school community. It is expected that some projects will require ethical review and the teaching team will guide students through that process; other projects will be more focused on improving curriculum or practice within a class, school or community context.


SES2999 Y

A full year course that will examine in depth topics of particular relevance not already covered in regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced and described in the schedule of courses.


SES3900 H

This course focuses on the uses and techniques of sociological methods in actual research projects and problems. The course will blend methods and discuss their relevance to theory, interpretation, and philosophy of science. It will be especially appropriate for students undertaking doctoral work. Students will be expected to discuss in class their own research problems. The class will consider the strengths and pitfalls of alternative research approaches and the representations they generate.


SES3943 H

This course explores two approaches to the study of power: historical sociology of state formation and genealogies of government. The course is intended for students who plan to study some aspect of politics, policy, and political subjectivity in their thesis research, and/or who are looking for ways to 'blend' Marx and Foucault in their work.


SES3999 Y

This year-long course has two purposes: It will reconceptualize in/equity by combining a concern with sustainability (often conceptualized as intergenerational equity) with social justice (sometimes conceptualized as intrageneral equity). In the first term, we will jointly examine selected literature on sustainability and various forms of social inequality, including sexism, racism, heterosexism, social class, and others. In the second term, students will engage in individual projects, relating one aspect of either sustainability or inequality to the framework that has been elaborated in the first term. The second purpose is to engage students in a publication project. The intent is to produce a joint book out of the course at the end. While publication of either a book or any individual paper cannot be guaranteed, students will nevertheless participate in the process of preparing a publication, from writing a prospectus to looking for a publication outlet, receiving and giving editorial criticism, etc.


TPS1010 Y

A seminar examining strategies, techniques, and problems involved in the conduct of research in educational administration. This seminar prepares the student for the evaluation, interpretation, and conduct of research and development in educational administration. Under the supervision of the instructor, each student is required to formulate, carry out, and report on a research project.


TPS1023 H

The study of patterns of interaction among adults in loosely defined organizational settings. Class members discover their operational interactive values, analyse interpersonal events, study effects of sociality variations, articulate personal changes resulting from cross-person behaviours, create the instrumental relationship, and attempt to understand the administrative efficacy of interpersonal competence in programs of organization change. To do this, the course uses detailed observations and descriptive notes, constructivist analysis of collaborative values priorities, and vignette validations towards leadership improvement.


TPS1028 H

Teachers and policy: complications for management. Attention is given to agenda-setting, backward mapping, crafting alternatives, estimating feasibility, and coping with unanticipated consequences. Ethnographic work and school administration with some attention to administration of programs for students


TPS1415 H

This course explores the history of teaching as an occupation. Drawing on recent Australian, British, and American studies, as well as on the Canadian literature, it examines the following topics: the changing composition of teaching forces; teachers' work and status in the schools; professionalization; the organization of teachers' associations and unions; class, ethnicity, race, and gender in teaching.


TPS1435 H

The course will consider major views of society and politics that have the development of democracy as their theme. The relation between projects of educational reform and democratic development will be examined.


TPS1439 H

This course will examine philosophical issues pertaining to the interrelationships of gender, ethical frameworks, and educational theory. Focus will be on recent feminist analyses of gender as a social construction, insights into how this construction is manifested and maintained, and critiques of and alternatives to mainstream ethical theory. How educational theory, on matters such as ideals, aims, curriculum content, and the teacher's role, would need to change in order to accommodate these perspectives will provide the


TPS1442 H

This course is framed by the belief that contemporary Canadian society must be understood in terms of the facts of cultural diversity and racialized difference and the moral/political commitments to promote respect and equity through public education while also avoiding indoctrination and intolerance. It will focus on the political and philosophical assumptions that underlie these expectations and on the tensions that are revealed when they are held in conjunction. In particular, the different kinds of assumptions underlying liberalism and perspectives critical of liberalism will be taken as an underlying theme. Throughout, the purpose is to facilitate critical reflection on the moral dimensions and implications of these assumptions.


TPS1446 H

This course starts from the assumption that teachers are already philosophers - i.e., their practice is informed by systems of beliefs and assumptions. Each student will have the opportunity to develop an initial articulation of his/her views on education in a personal interview with the instructor at the beginning of the term. These interviews will then be shared and will focus course readings, lectures, and requirements. The aim will be to examine the different ways in which philosophical assumptions form the foundation for educational beliefs. Topics addressed will include value, epistemological, political, and praxis questions within beliefs about educational aims, content, and teaching methods.


TPS1462 H

This course focuses on the representation of women in literature and film to illuminate political philosophies, epistemologies, and social concerns. The course introduces different theoretical and philosophical approaches from literary and film criticism that suggest diverse pedagogies and theories of reading as modes of educational engagement.


TPS1801 H

An examination of selected themes in the history of Canadian higher education, including secularization, the experience of women, professionalization, student life and academic freedom.


TPS1814 H

This course examines the logic and current practices related to curriculum design in postsecondary educational institutions.


TPS1815 H

This course examines the issues and areas that define the instructor's perspective of teaching in postsecondary educational institutions.


TPS1818 H

An exploration of a wide range of strategies for the enhancement of the education process with emphasis on the application of these strategies to the specific educational setting selected by the student.


TPS1822 H

An examination of leading concepts of the primary nature of universities and colleges as institutions of higher learning, beginning with the rise of the universities in medieval Europe and including their development to the present day, with particular emphasis upon the evolution of the concept of the university in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the attendant and sometimes diverse role of colleges. The seminar involves selected readings.


TPS1824 H

This course is designed to acquaint university and community college decision-makers with the methods for planning and evaluating educational facilities. The interaction between changes in educational policies, innovations in technology and curriculum, available resources, existing facilities, and the means and methods of implementation will be explored. Structural and institutional alterations required by policy changes will be investigated, and methodologies for the preparation of "educational specifications", facilities plans, architectural briefs, and other aspects of facilities planning will be surveyed.


TPS1827 H

What makes the politics of higher education different from politics in other arenas? What political relationships exist between postsecondary institutions and such external actors as government and faculty unions? What internal relations characterize political interactions between trustees, administrators, professors, students, and others? This course explores these questions from a research and experiential base.


TPS1838 H

The intent of this course is to explore current issues in continuing education including: access, quality, cost, profit/nonprofit providers and the use of technology. Of particular interest are the needs of a diverse population of adult learners, especially with respect to part-time study and factors related to the successful completion of Continuing Education programs; the roles of colleges, universities, the work place and professional organizations in the provision of non-credit as well as baccalaureate and post baccalaureate programs; the impact of educational technologies on the accessibility and the quality of continuing education.


TPS1839 H

This course will examine the administration of technology in higher education settings. Topics may include planning, procurement and implementation of technology infrastructures, including productivity technology for staff and faculty, student computing services and support, registrarial systems, online teaching systems, professional development, library systems, and academic and acceptable use policies.


TPS1842 H

An examination of the interaction between higher education institutions and the labor market, with particular emphasis on the human resources aspects of planning in higher education.


TPS3018 H

Concepts, perspectives, and methods of political science are used to deal with educational issues in structured ways, while educational issues are used to exemplify and assess the relevance of political science concepts for understanding education.


TPS3020 H

This course examines the social forces that are driving educational change in the postmodern age, and their impact upon both the substance, process and outcomes of educational change efforts. The course will investigate how students' identities, teachers' work and approaches to leadership are affected by these forces of change, along with the major change strategies that are being adopted to respond to them.


TPS3029 Y

This course will examine the research on how schools, districts and states can best bring about improvement. Research from the past decade will inform our insights into the improvement process, leading to an analysis of the factors which appear to have the most impact on the outcomes of educational change. Building on recent conceptualizations of 'tri-level' change which describe the roles played by educators and leaders in different parts of the system, this course will focus on understanding improvement efforts which are currently in process. Participants will select one of five case studies as the course project: England, Ontario, New South Wales, South Australia, or Washington State. Access will be provided to key documents and data for


TPS3423 H

This course is designed as a follow-up to TPS1422H. It is intended for students who are interested in pursuing the historical study of education and family life. This course is not a survey; rather, its primary concern will be a detailed examination of the major works in family history. Classroom discussions will be focused upon the major historiographical and methodological implications of monographic texts, each of which will be considered at length. Prerequisite: TPS 1422H or permission of instructor.


TPS3428 H

A research-oriented seminar on the historical tensions and concerns of immigrant and ethnic groups and their importance to the development of education in Canada. Prerequisite: TPS 1428H, TPS 1429H, or permission of instructor.


TPS3441 H

This is an advanced seminar based on topics covered by TPS 1441H but dealing with a selection of these in more depth. Topics are selected on the basis of the research interests of students and instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.


TPS3443 H

This is an advanced seminar based on topics covered by TPS 1441H but dealing with a selection of these in more depth. Topics are selected on the basis of the research interests of students and instructor.


TPS3447 H

Theories of modernity and of societal and political modernization will be reviewed and their limits will be considered. Basic arguments will be derived from more recent traditions in social theory, such as Frankfurt school social theory, neopragmatism, Foucauldian postmodernism and from some examples of Third world thought, especially Latin American thought. All these theories will be addressed with reference to some features of J. Habermas' theory of democratic modernization.


TPS3461 H

This course offers a research forum for students from various disciplines who are engaged in a major research project in areas relating to the social and educational context of the arts. Topics and methodologies representing a wide range of critical approaches are welcome. Students should already have a topic in mind for inquiry upon enrolling in the course.


TPS3461 H

A course that will examine in depth a topic of particular relevance not already covered in regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced each spring in the Fall/Winter Session and Summer Session schedules.


TPS3465 H

This course offers a research forum for students from various disciplines who are engaged in a major research project in areas relating to the social and educational context of the arts. Topics and methodologies representing a wide range of critical approaches are welcome. Students should already have a topic in mind for inquiry upon enrolling in the course.


TPS3465 H

A course that will examine in depth a topic of particular relevance not already covered in regular course offerings in the department. The topics will be announced each spring in the Fall/Winter Session and Summer Session schedules.


TPS3484 H

This course supports special field-oriented experience for doctoral candidates relating to their particular areas of scholarly interest. The student's activities will be planned in consultation with faculty and will involve seminars or tutorials as well as practical implementation in field situations. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be related to a thesis topic.


TPS3485 H

See description for course TPS 3484H.


TPS3494 H

This course supports special field-oriented experience for doctoral candidates relating to their particular areas of scholarly interest. The student's activities will be planned in consultation with faculty and will involve seminars or tutorials as well as practical implementation in field situations. While credit is not given for a thesis investigation proper, the study may be related to a thesis topic.


TPS3495 H

See description for course TPS 3494H.


TPS3806 H

This is a seminar course designed for students interested in the comparative study of higher education.


TPS8001 H

This course will examine the attempt to destroy European Jewry during the Nazi regime. The course will survey the various forms of the 'Final Solution of the Jewish Question', contrasting them with the Nazi persecution of other groups. It will examine issues of individual and group response and responsibility, including Canada's. The reactions of the victims as well as the role of the bystanders and the behaviour of the perpetrators are the central themes of the course.


TPS8001 H

This course will examine the attempt to destroy European Jewry during the Nazi regime. The course will survey the various forms of the 'Final Solution of the Jewish Question", contrasting them with the Nazi persecution of other groups. It will examine issues of individual and group response and responsibility, including Canada's. the reactions of the victims as well as the role of the bystanders and the behaviour of the perpetrators are the central themes of the course.


TPS8002 H

Anne Frank's diary is the eighth most widely-read book in the history of publishing. It is extraordinary that the words of a fourteen-year-old girl should have influenced and inspired so many people situated so differently across the globe. From Serbia where an adolescent girl named Zlata survived the war in her country by consciously following Anne's model to South America where the mothers and grandmothers of the "disappeared" have taken Anne as their model for political resistance, the inspirations and uses of her work have been legion. Not surprisingly, her message has also been "coopted" in ways she might never have intended. The wide-ranging impact and the many controversies which have swirled round the words of this unique diary are the subject of this course's inquiry. How can teachers introduce and use this text in Ontario classrooms? What background understandings do they need in order to illuminate the history of the text and


TPS8002 H




TPS8003 H

This course poses a series of questions that arise when preparing to teach and when teaching about the Holocaust and other Genocides. The questions will be posed to encourage the students to consider many viewpoints, to interrogate their own preconceptions, to foster an ability to be comfortable with their own evolving ideas/values and to resist coming to simplistic "solutions" or premature closure on complicated issues. The course will be will divided into three parts. The first part, "Definitions, Historical Overview and Personal Preparation" considers epistemological, political and emotional issues that can impact teaching and learning about the Holocaust and other genocides. The second part "Pedagogies, Curriculum Guidelines, Classroom Activities and Issues" considers available classroom learning materials, appropriate and potentially counterproductive teaching styles and how to use different academic subjects as entry points to learning about these challenging topics. Issues that arise in the classroom include the possibility of student and community resistance, Holocaust denial and the thorny political issue of the present day Middle East conflict. The final part of the course, "Student Presentations and the Possibilities/Pitfalls of Using Film as an Educational Tool" requires each student to make a presentation. Also, as many teachers increasingly rely on film as a means of engaging student interest, issues such as graphic content, age appropriateness and an overreliance on film will be discussed. As students will be busy summarizing and reconsidering their journal entries and preparing and presenting classroom materials, the required readings are appropriately reduced


TPS8004 H

Genocidal thought and action have endangered the existence of targeted groups throughout human history. The repeated occurrence of genocide challenges the conscience of humankind and presents an urgent need for understanding, research and scholarship. This course will take an interdisciplinary approach and will be divided into three parts. Part 1 will examine the concept and competing definitons of the term genocide. It will also consider the historical antecedents to contemporary genocide. These readings and discussions will provide a conceptual and historical framework for the contemporary case studies that will follow. Part 11 will look at five case studies that have occurred in the twentieth century, the century named by some scholars as the age of genocide. Although the social and historical background events of each genocide will be studied, each case study will also include a careful consideration of eyewitness accounts, especially the testimonial accounts of survivors. Memories, videotaped accounts, and guest lectures from survivors of recent genocides will be presented. In some cases artistic representations by survivors will also be considered. Part 111 will examine special issues in genocide research such as the effect of societal violence among children. In the common sense understanding of "victims of war" children have long been victims but more recently they have also become victims by being coerced into armies to become child killers and soldiers. The particular effects of genocide on men and women will also be examined. The course will end with a consideration of the importance of memory in preventing future occurrences of mass destruction.


TPS8005 H

Examining multiple texts of contemporary culture (diaries, novels, memoirs, poetry, film), this course will address methods and approaches for intermediate/senior teachers to study and teach about the Holocaust. Research has demonstrated that the marriage of history and narrative offers abundant entry points for students to connect and begin to understand lived experiences vastly different from their own. This course will explore the many pedagogical challenges of introducing these "difficult knowledges" (Britzman, 1998) in the intermediate/secondary classroom as an essential component of literary, moral and civic education.


TPS8006 H

This course will examine the history and contemporary implications of Canadian engagement with the Holocaust with special reference to the ways in which Holocaust memory, memorialization and education are of consequence to in-service educators and others in the community-based service delivery.


TPS8010 H

Offered as independent study, this course will provide students with the opportunity to develop their inquiry and research skills in relation to issues concerning the practice of teaching and learning about the Holocaust and other instances of genocide. Working together with the instructor, students will be expected to define an inquiry and the appropriate resources (texts, media, digital) in support of that inquiry. The inquiry which is the focus of the course may take various forms such as a conceptual investigation or a classroom based study, however its scope and method must be approved by the instructor. As the inquiry proceeds, the instructor and student will meet on a regular, individually scheduled basis to discuss the student's progress, written work and lines of further inquiry. It is expected that the course will culminate with the student's submission of a document detailing the inquiry and its results.


WPL1131 H

This course will introduce students to work and learning trends in Canada and internationally, with a focus on the relationships between workplace learning and social change. There are three intellectual objectives of this course. The first objective is to situate workplace learning within broader social trends such as globalization, neo-liberalism and organizational restructuring. Second, the course allows for an exploration of the connections between learning as an individual phenomenon and learning as a social/organizational and social policy phenomenon. Finally, a third objective of the course is to highlight the learning strategies that seek to foster social change through greater equality of power, inclusivity, participatory decision-making and economic democracy.


WPL2944 H

The goal of this course is to develop a working dialogue across two separate bodies of research -- learning theory & social movement theory -- that to date have encountered one another only rarely and when so, virtually always inadequately. Our goals are to understand knowledge production, distribution, storage, transmission as well as the learning dynamics endemic to social movement building, action, outcomes and change. The course will emphasize learning as a unified composite of individual and collective human change in relation socio-cultural and material perspectives primarily, the participatory structures of social movements as well as traditional changes in consciousness, skill and knowledge amongst participants. We will draw on both advanced theories of education/learning understood in the context of the long-established sociological sub-tradition known as ‘social movement studies’ and ‘social movement theory’. The course will take a critical approach to social movement studies introducing the inter-disciplinary history of social movement studies over the 20th century followed by reviews of canonical theories of political process and the polity model approach, resource mobilization, frame analysis, neo-frame analysis, contentious politics, dynamics of contention and contentious performances. A significant proportion of the course will involve detailed secondary analysis of a specific social movement of the student’s choosing, and will demand regular research reports that are meant to serve as a resource for our collective learning as well as to support the production of individual final papers directly. The course is highly recommended to advanced masters as well as doctoral students. No prerequisites







WPL2944 H




WPL3931 H

This course will allow students to engage in advanced learning and research on the central national and international debates in the field. Students will develop extensive analytic and conceptual knowledge in the areas of the historical development of the notion of ''workplace learning'' and its links to diverse agendas of social change. The course will require the critical assessment and research applications of theories of workplace learning and social change, as well as practice and policy in the area. The course will include exploration of advanced case study research as well as national and international survey research, and encourage the linkages with students doctoral thesis work. Weekly seminars will be held.